Browsing by Subject "Birth size"

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  • Hauta-alus, Helena H.; Viljakainen, Heli T.; Holmlund-Suila, Elisa M.; Enlund-Cerullo, Maria; Rosendahl, Jenni; Valkama, Saara M.; Helve, Otto M.; Hytinantti, Timo K.; Mäkitie, Outi M.; Andersson, Sture (2017)
    Background: Maternal vitamin D status has been associated with both gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and fetal growth restriction, however, the evidence is inconsistent. In Finland, maternal vitamin D status has improved considerably due to national health policies. Our objective was to compare maternal 25-hydroxy vitamin D concentrations [25(OH)D] between mothers with and without GDM, and to investigate if an association existed between maternal vitamin D concentration and infant birth size. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 723 mother-child pairs. Mothers were of Caucasian origin, and infants were born at term with normal birth weight. GDM diagnosis and birth size were obtained from medical records. Maternal 25(OH)D was determined on average at 11 weeks of gestation in pregnancy and in umbilical cord blood (UCB) at birth. Results: GDM was observed in 81 of the 723 women (11%). Of the study population, 97% were vitamin D sufficient [25(OH)D >= 50 nmol/L]. There was no difference in pregnancy 25(OH)D concentration between GDM and non-GDM mothers (82 vs 82 nmol/L, P = 0.99). Regression analysis confirmed no association between oral glucose tolerance test results and maternal 25(OH)D (P > 0.53). Regarding the birth size, mothers with optimal pregnancy 25(OH)D (>= 80 nmol/L) had heavier newborns than those with suboptimal pregnancy 25(OH)D (P = 0.010). However, mothers with optimal UCB 25(OH) D had newborns with smaller head circumference than those with suboptimal 25(OH)D (P = 0.003), which was further confirmed as a linear association (P = 0.024). Conclusions: Maternal vitamin D concentration was similar in mothers with and without GDM in a mostly vitamin D sufficient population. Associations between maternal vitamin D status and birth size were inconsistent. A sufficient maternal vitamin D status, specified as 25(OH)D above 50 nmol/L, may be a threshold above which the physiological requirements of pregnancy are achieved.
  • Hauta-alus, Helena H; Viljakainen, Heli T; Holmlund-Suila, Elisa M; Enlund-Cerullo, Maria; Rosendahl, Jenni; Valkama, Saara M; Helve, Otto M; Hytinantti, Timo K; Mäkitie, Outi M; Andersson, Sture (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background Maternal vitamin D status has been associated with both gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and fetal growth restriction, however, the evidence is inconsistent. In Finland, maternal vitamin D status has improved considerably due to national health policies. Our objective was to compare maternal 25-hydroxy vitamin D concentrations [25(OH)D] between mothers with and without GDM, and to investigate if an association existed between maternal vitamin D concentration and infant birth size. Methods This cross-sectional study included 723 mother-child pairs. Mothers were of Caucasian origin, and infants were born at term with normal birth weight. GDM diagnosis and birth size were obtained from medical records. Maternal 25(OH)D was determined on average at 11 weeks of gestation in pregnancy and in umbilical cord blood (UCB) at birth. Results GDM was observed in 81 of the 723 women (11%). Of the study population, 97% were vitamin D sufficient [25(OH)D ≥ 50 nmol/L]. There was no difference in pregnancy 25(OH)D concentration between GDM and non-GDM mothers (82 vs 82 nmol/L, P = 0.99). Regression analysis confirmed no association between oral glucose tolerance test results and maternal 25(OH)D (P > 0.53). Regarding the birth size, mothers with optimal pregnancy 25(OH)D (≥ 80 nmol/L) had heavier newborns than those with suboptimal pregnancy 25(OH)D (P = 0.010). However, mothers with optimal UCB 25(OH)D had newborns with smaller head circumference than those with suboptimal 25(OH)D (P = 0.003), which was further confirmed as a linear association (P = 0.024). Conclusions Maternal vitamin D concentration was similar in mothers with and without GDM in a mostly vitamin D sufficient population. Associations between maternal vitamin D status and birth size were inconsistent. A sufficient maternal vitamin D status, specified as 25(OH)D above 50 nmol/L, may be a threshold above which the physiological requirements of pregnancy are achieved. Trial registration The project protocol is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov in November 8, 2012 ( NCT01723852 ).
  • Heliövaara, Arja; Vuola, P.; Hukki, J.; Leikola, J. (2016)
    The purpose of this study was to evaluate perinatal features and the rate of cesarean section in children with non-syndromic sagittal synostosis and to compare these with the official statistics. The birth data of 36 consecutive children (25 boys) operated on using cranial vault remodeling because of primary sagittal synostosis were analyzed retrospectively from hospital records. The children were born between 2007 and 2011, and the surgery was performed before the age of 1 year. The official statistics of all Finnish newborns from the year 2010 (n = 61 371) were used as a reference. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used in statistical analyses. The average gestational age of the newborns with sagittal synostosis was 39.8 weeks (reference 39.7 weeks). The average birth weight was 3565.8 g (3540 g) for boys and 3197.2 g (3427 g) for girls, and the average lengths at birth are 51 cm (50.4 cm) and 49.4 cm (49.6 cm), respectively. The average head circumference was 36 cm for both sexes (35.2 and 34.6 cm for reference boys and girls). The mean age of mothers was 30.5 years (30.1 years). The rate of cesarean section was significantly increased 30.5 % (reference 16.6 %), and the rate of suction cup delivery was increased 13.9 % (9 %). In addition, a prolonged or difficult delivery was reported in three childbirths. Newborns with non-syndromic sagittal synostosis appear to be of average birth size and gestational age. The incidences of perinatal complications and cesarean sections were increased with problems occurring in more than half of the childbirths.