Browsing by Subject "Blood pressure"

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  • Saviluoto, Anssi; Harve-Rytsälä, Heini; Lääperi, Mitja; Kirves, Hetti; Jantti, Helena; Nurmi, Jouni (2020)
    Background Identifying stroke and other intracranial lesions in patients with a decreased level of consciousness may be challenging in prehospital settings. Our objective was to investigate whether the combination of systolic blood pressure, heart rate and age could be used to identify intracranial lesions. Methods We conducted a retrospective case-control study including patients with a decreased level of consciousness who had their airway secured during prehospital care. Patients with intracranial lesions were identified based on the final diagnoses at the end of hospitalization. We investigated the ability of systolic blood pressure, heart rate and age to identify intracranial lesions and derived a decision instrument. Results Of 425 patients, 127 had an intracranial lesion. Patients with a lesion were characterized by higher systolic blood pressure, lower heart rate and higher age (P <0.0001 for all). A systolic blood pressure >= 140 mmHg had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.5 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7 to 7.0), and > 170 mmHg had an OR of 8.2 (95% CI 4.5-15.32) for an intracranial lesion (reference: <140 mmHg). A heart rate <100 beats/min had an OR of 3.4 (95% CI 2.0 to 6.0, reference: >= 100). Age 50-70 had an OR of 4.1 (95% CI 2.0 to 9.0), and > 70 years had an OR of 10.2 (95% CI 4.8 to 23.2), reference: <50. Logarithms of ORs were rounded to the nearest integer to create a score with 0-2 points for age and blood pressure and 0-1 for heart rate, with an increasing risk for an intracranial lesion with higher scores. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the instrument was 0.810 (95% CI 0.850-0.890). Conclusions An instrument combining systolic blood pressure, heart rate and age may help identify stroke and other intracranial lesions in patients with a decreased level of consciousness in prehospital settings.
  • Korhonen, Päivi E.; Mikkola, Tuija; Kautiainen, Hannu; Eriksson, Johan G. (2021)
    High body mass index (BMI) is known to be associated with elevated blood pressure (BP). The present study aims to determine the relative importance of the two components of BMI, fat mass and lean body mass index, on BP levels. We assessed body composition with bioimpedance and performed 24 hour ambulatory BP measurements in 534 individuals (mean age 61 +/- 3 years) who had no cardiovascular medication. Fat mass index and lean mass index were calculated analogously to BMI as fat mass or lean body mass (kg) divided by the square of height (m2). Both fat mass index and lean mass index showed a positive, small to moderate relationship with all 24 hour BP components independently of age, sex, smoking, and leisure-time physical activity. There were no interaction effects between fat mass index and lean mass index on the mean BP levels. Adult lean body mass is a significant determinant of BP levels with an equal, albeit small to moderate magnitude as fat mass. Relatively high amount of muscle mass may not be beneficial to cardiovascular health.
  • Presseau, Justin; Mackintosh, Joan; Hawthorne, Gillian; Francis, Jill J.; Johnston, Marie; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Steen, Nick; Coulthard, Tom; Brown, Heather; Kaner, Eileen; Elovainio, Marko; Sniehotta, Falko F. (2018)
    Background: National diabetes audits in the UK show room for improvement in the quality of care delivered to people with type 2 diabetes in primary care. Systematic reviews of quality improvement interventions show that such approaches can be effective but there is wide variability between trials and little understanding concerning what explains this variability. A national cohort study of primary care across 99 UK practices identified modifiable predictors of healthcare professionals' prescribing, advising and foot examination. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of an implementation intervention to improve six guideline-recommended health professional behaviours in managing type 2 diabetes in primary care: prescribing for blood pressure and glycaemic control, providing physical activity and nutrition advice and providing updated diabetes education and foot examination. Methods: Two-armed cluster randomised trial involving 44 general practices. Primary outcomes (at 12 months follow-up): from electronic medical records, the proportion of patients receiving additional prescriptions for blood pressure and insulin initiation for glycaemic control and having a foot examination; and from a patient survey of a random sample of 100 patients per practice, reported receipt of updated diabetes education and physical activity and nutrition advice. Results: The implementation intervention did not lead to statistically significant improvement on any of the six clinical behaviours. 1,138,105 prescriptions were assessed. Intervention (29% to 37% patients) and control arms (31% to 35%) increased insulin initiation relative to baseline but were not statistically significantly different at follow-up (IRR 1.18, 95% CI 0.95-1.48). Intervention (45% to 53%) and control practices (45% to 50%) increased blood pressure prescription from baseline to follow-up but were not statistically significantly different at follow-up (IRR 1.05, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.16). Intervention (75 to 78%) and control practices (74 to 79%) increased foot examination relative to baseline; control practices increased statistically significantly more (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.75-0.94). Fewer patients in intervention (33%) than control practices (40%) reported receiving updated diabetes education (OR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.57-0.97). No statistically significant differences were observed in patient reports of having had a discussion about nutrition (intervention = 73%; control = 72%; OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.59-1.64) or physical activity (intervention = 57%; control = 62%; OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0. 56-1.11). Development and delivery of the intervention cost 1191 pound per practice. Conclusions: There was no measurable benefit to practices' participation in this intervention. Despite widespread use of outreach interventions worldwide, there is a need to better understand which techniques at which intensity are optimally suited to address the multiple clinical behaviours involved in improving care for type 2 diabetes.
  • Presseau, Justin; Mackintosh, Joan; Hawthorne, Gillian; Francis, Jill J; Johnston, Marie; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Steen, Nick; Coulthard, Tom; Brown, Heather; Kaner, Eileen; Elovainio, Marko; Sniehotta, Falko F (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background National diabetes audits in the UK show room for improvement in the quality of care delivered to people with type 2 diabetes in primary care. Systematic reviews of quality improvement interventions show that such approaches can be effective but there is wide variability between trials and little understanding concerning what explains this variability. A national cohort study of primary care across 99 UK practices identified modifiable predictors of healthcare professionals’ prescribing, advising and foot examination. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of an implementation intervention to improve six guideline-recommended health professional behaviours in managing type 2 diabetes in primary care: prescribing for blood pressure and glycaemic control, providing physical activity and nutrition advice and providing updated diabetes education and foot examination. Methods Two-armed cluster randomised trial involving 44 general practices. Primary outcomes (at 12 months follow-up): from electronic medical records, the proportion of patients receiving additional prescriptions for blood pressure and insulin initiation for glycaemic control and having a foot examination; and from a patient survey of a random sample of 100 patients per practice, reported receipt of updated diabetes education and physical activity and nutrition advice. Results The implementation intervention did not lead to statistically significant improvement on any of the six clinical behaviours. 1,138,105 prescriptions were assessed. Intervention (29% to 37% patients) and control arms (31% to 35%) increased insulin initiation relative to baseline but were not statistically significantly different at follow-up (IRR 1.18, 95%CI 0.95–1.48). Intervention (45% to 53%) and control practices (45% to 50%) increased blood pressure prescription from baseline to follow-up but were not statistically significantly different at follow-up (IRR 1.05, 95%CI 0.96 to 1.16). Intervention (75 to 78%) and control practices (74 to 79%) increased foot examination relative to baseline; control practices increased statistically significantly more (OR 0.84, 95%CI 0.75–0.94). Fewer patients in intervention (33%) than control practices (40%) reported receiving updated diabetes education (OR = 0.74, 95%CI 0.57–0.97). No statistically significant differences were observed in patient reports of having had a discussion about nutrition (intervention = 73%; control = 72%; OR = 0.98, 95%CI 0.59–1.64) or physical activity (intervention = 57%; control = 62%; OR = 0.79, 95%CI 0.56–1.11). Development and delivery of the intervention cost £1191 per practice. Conclusions There was no measurable benefit to practices’ participation in this intervention. Despite widespread use of outreach interventions worldwide, there is a need to better understand which techniques at which intensity are optimally suited to address the multiple clinical behaviours involved in improving care for type 2 diabetes. Trial registration ISRCTN, ISRCTN66498413 . Registered April 4, 2013
  • Zhou, Bin; Bentham, James; Di Cesare, Mariachiara; Bixby, Honor; Danaei, Goodarz; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Taddei, Cristina; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M.; Djalalinia, Shirin; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Lugero, Charles; Peykari, Niloofar; Zhang, Wan Zhu; Bennett, James; Bilano, Ver; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Cowan, Melanie J.; Riley, Leanne M.; Chen, Zhengming; Hambleton, Ian R.; Jackson, Rod T.; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Khang, Young-Ho; Laxmaiah, Avula; Liu, Jing; Malekzadeh, Reza; Neuhauser, Hannelore K.; Soric, Maroje; Starc, Gregor; Sundstrom, Johan; Woodward, Mark; Ezzati, Majid; Abarca-Gomez, Leandra; Abdeen, Ziad A.; Abu-Rmeileh, Niveen M.; Acosta-Cazares, Benjamin; Adams, Robert J.; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Afsana, Kaosar; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Agyemang, Charles; Ahmad, Noor Ani; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Ajlouni, Kamel; Akhtaeva, Nazgul; Eriksson, Johan G.; Kajantie, Eero O.; Kauhanen, Jussi; Peltonen, Markku; Salonen, Jukka Tapio; Saramies, Jouko L. (2018)
    Background: Change in the prevalence of raised blood pressure could be due to both shifts in the entire distribution of blood pressure (representing the combined effects of public health interventions and secular trends) and changes in its high-blood-pressure tail (representing successful clinical interventions to control blood pressure in the hypertensive population). Our aim was to quantify the contributions of these two phenomena to the worldwide trends in the prevalence of raised blood pressure. Methods: We pooled 1018 population-based studies with blood pressure measurements on 88.6 million participants from 1985 to 2016. We first calculated mean systolic blood pressure (SBP), mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and prevalence of raised blood pressure by sex and 10-year age group from 20-29 years to 70-79 years in each study, taking into account complex survey design and survey sample weights, where relevant. We used a linear mixed effect model to quantify the association between (probit-transformed) prevalence of raised blood pressure and age-group-and sex-specific mean blood pressure. We calculated the contributions of change in mean SBP and DBP, and of change in the prevalence-mean association, to the change in prevalence of raised blood pressure. Results: In 2005-16, at the same level of population mean SBP and DBP, men and women in South Asia and in Central Asia, the Middle East and North Africa would have the highest prevalence of raised blood pressure, and men and women in the high-income Asia Pacific and high-income Western regions would have the lowest. In most region-sex-age groups where the prevalence of raised blood pressure declined, one half or more of the decline was due to the decline in mean blood pressure. Where prevalence of raised blood pressure has increased, the change was entirely driven by increasing mean blood pressure, offset partly by the change in the prevalence-mean association. Conclusions: Change in mean blood pressure is the main driver of the worldwide change in the prevalence of raised blood pressure, but change in the high-blood-pressure tail of the distribution has also contributed to the change in prevalence, especially in older age groups.
  • Saarinen, Aino I. L.; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Hintsa, Taina; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Ravaja, Niklas; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli; Hintsanen, Mirka (2020)
    Background This study investigated (i) whether compassion is associated with blood pressure or hypertension in adulthood and (ii) whether familial risk for hypertension modifies these associations. Method The participants (N = 1112-1293) came from the prospective Young Finns Study. Parental hypertension was assessed in 1983-2007; participants' blood pressure in 2001, 2007, and 2011; hypertension in 2007 and 2011 (participants were aged 30-49 years in 2007-2011); and compassion in 2001. Results High compassion predicted lower levels of diastolic and systolic blood pressure in adulthood. Additionally, high compassion was related to lower risk for hypertension in adulthood among individuals with no familial risk for hypertension (independently of age, sex, participants' and their parents' socioeconomic factors, and participants' health behaviors). Compassion was not related to hypertension in adulthood among individuals with familial risk for hypertension. Conclusion High compassion predicts lower diastolic and systolic blood pressure in adulthood. Moreover, high compassion may protect against hypertension among individuals without familial risk for hypertension. As our sample consisted of comparatively young participants, our findings provide novel implications for especially early-onset hypertension.
  • Laakkonen, Hanne; Happonen, Juha-Matti; Marttinen, Eino; Paganus, Aila; Holtta, Tuula; Holmberg, Christer; Rönnholm, Kai (2010)
  • Sieminski, Mariusz; Szypenbejl, Jacek; Partinen, Eemil (2018)
    The aim of this review was to summarize collected data on the role of orexin and orexin neurons in the control of sleep and blood pressure. Although orexins (hypocretins) have been known for only 20 years, an impressive amount of data is now available regarding their physiological role. Hypothalamic orexin neurons are responsible for the control of food intake and energy expenditure, motivation, circadian rhythm of sleep and wake, memory, cognitive functions, and the cardiovascular system. Multiple studies show that orexinergic stimulation results in increased blood pressure and heart rate and that this effect may be efficiently attenuated by orexinergic antagonism. Increased activity of orexinergic neurons is also observed in animal models of hypertension. Pharmacological intervention in the orexinergic system is now one of the therapeutic possibilities in insomnia. Although the role of orexin in the control of blood pressure is well described, we are still lacking clinical evidence that this is a possibility for a new approach in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.
  • Gordin, Daniel; Bernardi, Luciano; Rosengård-Bärlund, Milla; Makinen, Ville-Petteri; Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Forsblom, Carol; Sandelin, Anna; Groop, Per-Henrik (2016)
    Aims Although oxygen is commonly used to treat various medical conditions, it has recently been shown to worsen vascular function (arterial stiffness) in healthy volunteers and even more in patients in whom vascular function might already be impaired. The effects of oxygen on arterial function in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are unknown, although such patients display disturbed vascular function already at rest. Therefore, we tested whether short-term oxygen administration may alter the arterial function in patients with T1D. Methods We estimated arterial stiffness by augmentation index (AIx) and the pulse wave velocity equivalent (SI-DVP) in 98 patients with T1D and 49 age-and sex-matched controls at baseline and during hyperoxia by obtaining continuous noninvasive finger pressure waveforms using a recently validated method. Results AIx and SI-DVP increased in patients (P <0.05) but not in controls in response to hyperoxia. The increase in AIx (P = 0.05), systolic (P <0.05), and diastolic (P <0.05) blood pressure was higher in the patients than in the controls. Conclusions Short-term oxygen administration deteriorates arterial function in patients with T1D compared to non-diabetic control subjects. Since disturbed arterial function plays a major role in the development of diabetic complications, these findings may be of clinical relevance.
  • Niini, Tarmo; Laakso, Aki; Tanskanen, Päivi; Niemelä, Mika; Luostarinen, Teemu (2019)
    We reviewed retrospectively the perioperative treatment of microsurgically resected brain arteriovenous malformations (bAVMs) at the neurosurgical department of Helsinki University Hospital between the years 2006 and 2014. We examined the performance of the treatment protocol and the incidence of delayed postoperative hemorrhage (DPH).
  • Waltimo, Tuure (Helsingfors universitet, 2016)
    Background and purpose: Most guidelines for intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) in acute ischaemic stroke patients advise keeping systolic blood pressure (BP) below 180/105 mmHg prior to the bolus injection. Less is known about optimal management of BP thereafter. We assessed temporal changes in post-thrombolytic systolic BP values and their impact on development of symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH). Methods: The study cohort included 1868 consecutive acute ischaemic stroke patients treated with IVT at the Helsinki University Central Hospital. sICH was defi ned according to the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study II (ECASS-II) (primary outcome), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke criteria. We evaluated BP at admission, prior to IVT and at 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after thrombolysis. We used univariate and multivariable models to test the effect of BP at various time-points on development of post-thrombolytic sICH. Results: Prevalence of sICH in the cohort was 5.8% (ECASS-II). Patients with sICH had significantly higher systolic BP at several time-points after IVT compared with those without sICH (P < 0.01 at 2 and 4 h; P < 0.05 at 12 and 48 h). The odds ratios for development of sICH per 10 mmHg increase in BP were 1.14 [95% confi dence interval (CI), 1.03–1.25], 1.14 (95% CI, 1.03–1.25), 1.12 (95% CI, 1.01–1.23) and 1.12 (95% CI, 1.01–1.23), respectively. At 8 h, we observed a trend (P = 0.07) for ECASS-II and a significant effect (P < 0.05) for National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke criteria. Thus, the only timepoint with no difference observed was 24 h. Conclusions: Patients with post-thrombolytic sICH have signifi cantly higher systolic BP at several time-points compared with patients without sICH.
  • Granlund, Peder Annaeus; Odegaard, Jostein Strand; Skjerven, Havard Ove; Carlsen, Karin C. Lodrup; Hanseus, Katarina; Rognvaldsson, Ingolfur; Sunnegardh, Jan; Turanlahti, Maila L.; Holmstrom, Henrik (2019)
    Aim This study determined the use of standardised procedures for infant noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) measurements in the Nordic countries and aimed to identify factors included in the standardisation and interpretation of NIBP measurements in infants. Methods A cross-sectional electronic questionnaire survey was sent to 84 physicians in all 23 university hospitals in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland and was completed from February to March 2017. The survey contained respondent characteristics, the presence and description of standardised procedures for NIBP measurements, daily practice of NIBP measurements and methodological considerations and interpretation of NIBP measurements in a healthy six-month-old child. Results We received responses from 55 of 84 physicians working in all 23 Nordic university hospitals, in paediatric cardiology (n = 22), general paediatrics (n = 16), paediatric nephrology (n = 14) and other fields (n = 3). Less than a quarter (23%) said their hospital issued specific NIBP procedures relating to infants and they referred to 19 different sources of information. The factors that were most commonly assessed for interpretation were age (100%), arousal state (78%) and cuff size (76%). Conclusion Most of the university hospital units treating children lacked age-specific written procedures for measuring and interpreting infant NIBP, and there is a strong need for common Nordic guidelines.
  • Jakkula, Pekka; Reinikainen, Matti; Hästbacka, Johanna; Pettilä, Ville; Loisa, Pekka; Karlsson, Sari; Laru-Sompa, Raili; Bendel, Stepani; Oksanen, Tuomas; Birkelund, Thomas; Tiainen, Marjaana; Toppila, Jussi; Hakkarainen, Antti; Skrifvars, Markus B.; COMACARE Study Grp (2017)
    Background: Arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2), oxygen tension (PaO2), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) are modifiable factors that affect cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral oxygen delivery, and potentially the course of brain injury after cardiac arrest. No evidence regarding optimal treatment targets exists. Methods: The Carbon dioxide, Oxygen, and Mean arterial pressure After Cardiac Arrest and REsuscitation (COMACARE) trial is a pilot multi-center randomized controlled trial (RCT) assessing the feasibility of targeting low-or high-normal PaCO2, PaO2, and MAP in comatose, mechanically ventilated patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), as well as its effect on brain injury markers. Using a 23 factorial design, participants are randomized upon admission to an intensive care unit into one of eight groups with various combinations of PaCO2, PaO2, and MAP target levels for 36 h after admission. The primary outcome is neuron-specific enolase (NSE) serum concentration at 48 h after cardiac arrest. The main feasibility outcome is the between-group differences in PaCO2, PaO2, and MAP during the 36 h after ICU admission. Secondary outcomes include serum concentrations of NSE, S100 protein, and cardiac troponin at 24, 48, and 72 h after cardiac arrest; cerebral oxygenation, measured with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS); potential differences in epileptic activity, monitored via continuous electroencephalogram (EEG); and neurological outcomes at six months after cardiac arrest. Discussion: The trial began in March 2016 and participant recruitment has begun in all seven study sites as of March 2017. Currently, 115 of the total of 120 patients have been included. When completed, the results of this trial will provide preliminary clinical evidence regarding the feasibility of targeting low-or high-normal PaCO2, PaO2, and MAP values and its effect on developing brain injury, brain oxygenation, and epileptic seizures after cardiac arrest. The results of this trial will be used to evaluate whether a larger RCT on this subject is justified.
  • Hägg-Holmberg, Stefanie; Dahlström, Emma H; Forsblom, Carol M; Harjutsalo, Valma; Liebkind, Ron; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Groop, Per-Henrik; Thorn, Lena M (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background Hypertension is one of the strongest risk factors for stroke in the general population, while systolic blood pressure has been shown to independently increase the risk of stroke in type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association between different blood pressure variables and risk of stroke in type 1 diabetes, and to explore potential nonlinearity of this relationship. Methods We included 4105 individuals with type 1 diabetes without stroke at baseline, participating in the nationwide Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study. Mean age at baseline was 37.4 ± 11.9 years, median duration of diabetes 20.9 (interquartile range 11.5–30.4) years, and 52% were men. Office systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured. Based on these pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were calculated. Strokes were classified based on medical and autopsy records, as well as neuroimaging. Cox proportional hazard models were performed to study how the different blood pressure variables affected the risk of stroke and its subtypes. Results During median follow-up time of 11.9 (9.21–13.9) years, 202 (5%) individuals suffered an incident stroke; 145 (72%) were ischemic and 57 (28%) hemorrhagic. SBP, DBP, PP, and MAP all independently increased the risk of any stroke. SBP, PP, and MAP increased the risk of ischemic stroke, while SBP, DBP, and MAP increased the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. SBP was strongly associated with stroke with a hazard ratio of 1.20 (1.11–1.29)/10 mmHg. When variables were modeled using restricted cubic splines, the risk of stroke increased linearly for SBP, MAP, and PP, and non-linearly for DBP. Conclusions The different blood pressure variables are all independently associated with increased risk of stroke in individuals with type 1 diabetes. The risk of stroke, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke increases linearly at blood pressure levels less than the current recommended treatment guidelines.
  • Finndiane Study Grp; Hägg-Holmberg, Stefanie; Dahlström, Emma H.; Forsblom, Carol M.; Harjutsalo, Valma; Liebkind, Ron; Putaala, Jukka; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Groop, Per-Henrik; Thorn, Lena M. (2019)
    Background: Hypertension is one of the strongest risk factors for stroke in the general population, while systolic blood pressure has been shown to independently increase the risk of stroke in type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to elucidate the association between different blood pressure variables and risk of stroke in type 1 diabetes, and to explore potential nonlinearity of this relationship. Methods: We included 4105 individuals with type 1 diabetes without stroke at baseline, participating in the nationwide Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study. Mean age at baseline was 37.411.9years, median duration of diabetes 20.9 (interquartile range 11.5-30.4) years, and 52% were men. Office systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured. Based on these pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were calculated. Strokes were classified based on medical and autopsy records, as well as neuroimaging. Cox proportional hazard models were performed to study how the different blood pressure variables affected the risk of stroke and its subtypes.ResultsDuring median follow-up time of 11.9 (9.21-13.9) years, 202 (5%) individuals suffered an incident stroke; 145 (72%) were ischemic and 57 (28%) hemorrhagic. SBP, DBP, PP, and MAP all independently increased the risk of any stroke. SBP, PP, and MAP increased the risk of ischemic stroke, while SBP, DBP, and MAP increased the risk of hemorrhagic stroke. SBP was strongly associated with stroke with a hazard ratio of 1.20 (1.11-1.29)/10mmHg. When variables were modeled using restricted cubic splines, the risk of stroke increased linearly for SBP, MAP, and PP, and non-linearly for DBP. Conclusions: The different blood pressure variables are all independently associated with increased risk of stroke in individuals with type 1 diabetes. The risk of stroke, ischemic stroke, and hemorrhagic stroke increases linearly at blood pressure levels less than the current recommended treatment guidelines.
  • Rehm, Juergen; Anderson, Peter; Prieto, Jose Angel Arbesu; Armstrong, Iain; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Bachmann, Michael; Bastus, Nuria Bastida; Brotons, Carlos; Burton, Robyn; Cardoso, Manuel; Colom, Joan; Duprez, Daniel; Gmel, Gerrit; Gual, Antoni; Kraus, Ludwig; Kreutz, Reinhold; Liira, Helena; Manthey, Jakob; Moller, Lars; Okruhlica, Lubomir; Roerecke, Michael; Scafato, Emanuele; Schulte, Bernd; Segura-Garcia, Lidia; Shield, Kevin David; Sierra, Cristina; Vyshinskiy, Konstantin; Wojnarand, Marcin; Zarco, Jose (2017)
    Background: Hazardous and harmful alcohol use and high blood pressure are central risk factors related to premature non-communicable disease (NCD) mortality worldwide. A reduction in the prevalence of both risk factors has been suggested as a route to reach the global NCD targets. This study aims to highlight that screening and interventions for hypertension and hazardous and harmful alcohol use in primary healthcare can contribute substantially to achieving the NCD targets. Methods: A consensus conference based on systematic reviews, meta-analyses, clinical guidelines, experimental studies, and statisticalmodelling which had been presented and discussed in five preparatory meetings, was undertaken. Specifically, we modelled changes in blood pressure distributions and potential lives saved for the five largest European countries if screening and appropriate intervention rates in primary healthcare settings were increased. Recommendations to handle alcohol-induced hypertension in primary healthcare settings were derived at the conference, and their degree of evidence was graded. Results: Screening and appropriate interventions for hazardous alcohol use and use disorders could lower blood pressure levels, but there is a lack in implementing these measures in European primary healthcare. Recommendations included (1) an increase in screening for hypertension (evidence grade: high), (2) an increase in screening and brief advice on hazardous and harmful drinking for people with newly detected hypertension by physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals (evidence grade: high), (3) the conduct of clinical management of less severe alcohol use disorders for incident people with hypertension in primary healthcare (evidence grade: moderate), and (4) screening for alcohol use in hypertension that is not well controlled (evidence grade: moderate). The first three measures were estimated to result in a decreased hypertension prevalence and hundreds of saved lives annually in the examined countries. Conclusions: The implementation of the outlined recommendations could contribute to reducing the burden associated with hypertension and hazardous and harmful alcohol use and thus to achievement of the NCD targets. Implementation should be conducted in controlled settings with evaluation, including, but not limited to, economic evaluation.
  • CTR-TBI Investigators Participants; Huijben, Jilske A.; Volovici, Victor; Cnossen, Maryse C.; Haitsma, Iain K.; Stocchetti, Nino; Maas, Andrew I. R.; Menon, David K.; Ercole, Ari; Citerio, Giuseppe; Nelson, David; Polinder, Suzanne; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Lingsma, Hester F.; van der Jagt, Mathieu; Raj, Rahul (2018)
    Background: General supportive and preventive measures in the intensive care management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) aim to prevent or limit secondary brain injury and optimize recovery. The aim of this survey was to assess and quantify variation in perceptions on intensive care unit (ICU) management of patients with TBI in European neurotrauma centers. Methods: We performed a survey as part of the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) study. We analyzed 23 questions focused on: 1) circulatory and respiratory management; 2) fever control; 3) use of corticosteroids; 4) nutrition and glucose management; and 5) seizure prophylaxis and treatment. Results: The survey was completed predominantly by intensivists (n = 33, 50%) and neurosurgeons (n = 23, 35%) from 66 centers (97% response rate). The most common cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) target was > 60 mmHg (n = 39, 60%) and/or an individualized target (n = 25, 38%). To support CPP, crystalloid fluid loading (n = 60, 91%) was generally preferred over albumin (n = 15, 23%), and vasopressors (n = 63, 96%) over inotropes (n = 29, 44%). The most commonly reported target of partial pressure of carbon dioxide in arterial blood (PaCO2) was 36-40 mmHg (4.8-5.3 kPa) in case of controlled intracranial pressure (ICP) <20 mmHg (n = 45, 69%) and PaCO2 target of 30-35 mmHg (4-4.7 kPa) in case of raised ICP (n = 40, 62%). Almost all respondents indicated to generally treat fever (n = 65, 98%) with paracetamol (n = 61, 92%) and/or external cooling (n = 49, 74%). Conventional glucose management (n = 43, 66%) was preferred over tight glycemic control (n = 18, 28%). More than half of the respondents indicated to aim for full caloric replacement within 7 days (n = 43, 66%) using enteral nutrition (n = 60, 92%). Indications for and duration of seizure prophylaxis varied, and levetiracetam was mostly reported as the agent of choice for both seizure prophylaxis (n = 32, 49%) and treatment (n = 40, 61%). Conclusions: Practice preferences vary substantially regarding general supportive and preventive measures in TBI patients at ICUs of European neurotrauma centers. These results provide an opportunity for future comparative effectiveness research, since a more evidence-based uniformity in good practices in general ICU management could have a major impact on TBI outcome.
  • Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Savolainen-Peltonen, Hanna (2017)
    A vast majority of menopausal women suffer from vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flushes and night sweats, the mean duration of which may be up to 7-10 years. In addition to a decreased quality of life, vasomotor symptoms may have an impact on overall health. Vasomotor symptoms are associated with overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system, and sympathetic overdrive in turn is associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Menopausal hot flushes have a complex relationship to different features of the metabolic syndrome and not all data point towards an association between vasomotor symptoms and metabolic syndrome. Thus, it is still unclear whether vasomotor symptoms are an independent risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Research in this area is constantly evolving and we present here the most recent data on the possible association between menopausal vasomotor symptoms and the metabolic syndrome. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.