Browsing by Subject "Body mass index"

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  • I Family Consortium; Bogl, L. H.; Mehlig, K.; Intemann, T.; Masip, G.; Keski-Rahkonen, A.; Kaprio, J.; Hebestreit, A. (2019)
    Background and aims: By investigating differences in lifestyle behaviours and BMI in sibling pairs, family-level confounding is minimized and causal inference is improved, compared to cross-sectional studies of unrelated children. Thus, we aimed to investigate within-sibling pair differences in different lifestyle behaviours and differences in BMI z-scores in children and adolesents. Methods and results: We examined three groups of sibling pairs 1) all same-sex sibling pairs with maximum 4 years age difference (n = 1209 pairs from 1072 families in 8 countries, mean age 10.7 years, standard deviation 2.4 years), 2) sibling pairs discordant for overweight (n = 262) and 3) twin pairs (n = 85). Usual dietary intake was estimated by 24-h recalls and time spent in light (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was measured by accelerometers. Screen time, sleep and dieting for weight loss were assessed by questionnaires. Within all 3 groups of sibling pairs, more time in MVPA was associated with lower BMI z-score. Higher energy intake was associated with higher BMI z-score within twin pairs and within all sibling pairs who were not currently dieting for weight loss. Regarding LPA, screen time or sleep duration, no or inconsistent associations were observed for the three groups of sibling pairs. Conclusions: MVPA and energy intake were associated with BMI differences within sibling and twin pairs growing up in the same home, thus independent of family-level confounding factors. Future studies should explore whether genetic variants regulating appetite or energy expenditure behaviours account for weight differences in sibling pairs. (C) 2019 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Tuomela, Jenni; Kaprio, Jaakko; Sipilä, Pyry N.; Silventoinen, Karri; Wang, Xin; Ollikainen, Miina; Piirtola, Maarit (2019)
    Objective: To determine the accuracy of self-reported height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) compared to the measured values, and to assess the similarity between self-reported and measured values within dizygotic (DZ) and monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs. Methods: The data on self-reported and measured height, weight and WC values as well as measured hip circumference (HC) were collected from 444 twin individuals (53-67 years old, 60% women). Accuracies between self-reported and measured values were assessed by Pearson's correlation coefficients, Cohen's kappa coefficients and Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement. Intra-class correlation was used in within-pair analyses. Results: The correlations between self-reported and measured values were high for all variables (r = 0.86-0.98), although the agreement assessed by Bland-Altman 95% limits had relatively wide variation. The degree of overestimating height was similar in both sexes, whereas women tended to underestimate and men overestimate their weight. Cohen's kappa coefficients between self-reported and measured BMI categories were high: 0.71 in men and 0.70 in women. Further, the mean self-reported WC was less than the mean measured WC (difference in men 2.5 cm and women 2.6 cm). The within-pair correlations indicated a tendency of MZ co-twins to report anthropometric measures more similarly than DZ co-twins. Conclusions: Self-reported anthropometric measures are reasonably accurate indicators for obesity in large cohort studies. However, the possibility of more similar reporting among MZ pairs should be taken into account in twin studies exploring the heritability of different phenotypes. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity.
  • Jang, Jieun; Cho, Eun-Jung; Hwang, Yunji; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Ahn, Choonghyun; Choi, Jeoungbin; Chang, Soung-Hoon; Shin, Hai-Rim; Lim, Min Kyung; Yoo, Keun-Young; Park, Sue K. (2019)
    Purpose Few studies investigated roles of body mass index (BMI) on gastric cancer (GC) risk according to Helicobacter pylori infection status. This study was conducted to evaluate associations between BMI and GC risk with consideration of H. pylori infection information. Materials and Methods We performed a case-cohort study (n=2,458) that consists of a subcohort (n=2,193 including 67 GC incident cases) randomly selected from the Korean Multicenter Cancer Cohort (KMCC) and 265 incident GC cases outside of the subcohort. H. pylori infection was assessed using an immunoblot assay. GC risk according to BMI was evaluated by calculating hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) using weighted Cox hazard regression model. Results Increased GC risk in lower BMI group (= 25 kg/m(2)) showed non-significantly increased GC risk (HR, 10.82; 95% CI, 1.25 to 93.60 and HR, 11.33; 95% CI, 1.13 to 113.66, respectively). However, these U-shaped associations between BMI and GC risk were not observed in the group who had ever been infected by H. pylori. Conclusion This study suggests the U-shaped associations between BMI and GC risk, especially in subjects who had never been infected by H. pylori.
  • Salmela, Jatta Helena; Mauramo, Elina; Lallukka, Tea; Rahkonen, Ossi; Kanerva, Noora (2019)
    Objective: Childhood disadvantage is associated with a higher risk of adult obesity, but little is known about its associations with body mass index (BMI) trajectories during adulthood. This study aimed first to identify adulthood BMI trajectories, and second to investigate how childhood disadvantage is associated with trajectory group membership. Methods: Data from the Helsinki Health Study, a longitudinal cohort study of initially 40- to 60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki in Finland, were used. The baseline survey was conducted in 2000–2002, and similar follow-up surveys in 2007, 2012, and 2017. Based on self-reported BMI, participants’ (n =5,266; 83% women) BMI trajectories, including their retrospectively reported BMI at the age of 25 years, were examined. Data on childhood disadvantage, including parental education and 7 types of childhood adversity (their own serious illness; parental divorce, death, mental disorder, or alcohol problems; economic difficulties at home; and peer group bullying) before the age of 16 years, were obtained from the baseline survey. Group-based trajectory modeling was used to identify BMI trajectories, and multinomial logistic regression to analyze the odds for trajectory group membership for the disadvantage variables. Results: Four ascending BMI trajectories in women and men were found: persistent normal weight (trajectory 1; women 35% and men 25%), normal weight to overweight (trajectory 2; women 41% and men 48%), normal weight to class I obesity (trajectory 3; women 19% and men 23%) and overweight to class II obesity (trajectory 4; women 5% and men 4%). Compared to trajectory 1, women with multiple adversities and repetitive peer bullying in childhood had greater odds of belonging to trajectories 3 and 4, whereas men with parental alcohol problems had greater odds of belonging to trajectory 4. For women and men, a low level of parental education was associated with a higher-level BMI trajectory. Conclusions: Low parental education for both genders, multiple adversities and repetitive peer bullying in childhood among women, and parental alcohol problems among men increased the odds of developing obesity during adulthood. Further studies are needed to clarify how gender differences modify the effects of childhood disadvantage on adult BMI trajectories.
  • Mustelin, Linda; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna (2018)
    Objective: Binge eating disorder (BED) is a clinical eating disorder that is strongly and bidirectionally related to overweight and obesity. Little is known about how subclinical features of BED relate to weight development in adolescence and young adulthood. Method: Women (n=2825) and men (n=2423) from the community-based longitudinal FinnTwin16 cohort participated. Seven eating-related cognitions and behaviors similar to the defining features of BED were extracted from the Eating Disorder Inventory-2 and were assessed at a mean age of 24. We used linear mixed models to assess the association of features of BED with BMI trajectories across four waves of data collection (mean ages 16, 17, 18, and 24). Results: The number of features of BED at wave 4 (age 24) was significantly associated with BMI from age 16 years onwards. Those reporting more features of BED had gained more weight throughout adolescence and into their twenties. Conclusions: Features of BED in young adulthood were preceded by steeper BMI trajectories in adolescence. A higher number of features were consistently associated with higher BMI and more weight gain.
  • Guo, Qi; Burgess, Stephen; Turman, Constance; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Lush, Michael; Abraham, Jean; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Apicella, Carmel; Arndt, Volker; Barrdahl, Myrto; Benitez, Javier; Berg, Christine D.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brand, Judith S.; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Burwinkel, Barbara; Caldas, Carlos; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chin, Suet-Feung; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Devilee, Peter; Diver, W. Ryan; Dunning, Alison M.; Earl, Helena M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ekici, Arif B.; Eriksson, Mikael; Evans, D. Gareth; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Giles, Graham G.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; kConFab-AOCS Investigators (2017)
    There is increasing evidence that elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with reduced survival for women with breast cancer. However, the underlying reasons remain unclear. We conducted a Mendelian randomization analysis to investigate a possible causal role of BMI in survival from breast cancer. We used individual-level data from six large breast cancer case-cohorts including a total of 36 210 individuals (2475 events) of European ancestry. We created a BMI genetic risk score (GRS) based on genotypes at 94 known BMI-associated genetic variants. Association between the BMI genetic score and breast cancer survival was analysed by Cox regression for each study separately. Study-specific hazard ratios were pooled using fixed-effect meta-analysis. BMI genetic score was found to be associated with reduced breast cancer-specific survival for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.11, per one-unit increment of GRS, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.22, P = 0.03). We observed no association for ER-negative cases (HR = 1.00, per one-unit increment of GRS, 95% CI 0.89-1.13,P = 0.95). Our findings suggest a causal effect of increased BMI on reduced breast cancer survival for ER-positive breast cancer. There is no evidence of a causal effect of higher BMI on survival for ER-negative breast cancer cases.
  • Linna, Milla S.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Raevuori, Anu; Sihvola, Elina; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Rissanen, Aila (2013)
  • Takatalo, Jani; Karppinen, Jaro; Taimela, Simo; Niinimaki, Jaakko; Laitinen, Jaana; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Paananen, Markus; Remes, Jouko; Nayha, Simo; Tammelin, Tuija; Korpelainen, Raija; Tervonen, Osmo (2013)
  • Korhonen, Päivi E.; Mikkola, Tuija; Kautiainen, Hannu; Eriksson, Johan G. (2021)
    High body mass index (BMI) is known to be associated with elevated blood pressure (BP). The present study aims to determine the relative importance of the two components of BMI, fat mass and lean body mass index, on BP levels. We assessed body composition with bioimpedance and performed 24 hour ambulatory BP measurements in 534 individuals (mean age 61 +/- 3 years) who had no cardiovascular medication. Fat mass index and lean mass index were calculated analogously to BMI as fat mass or lean body mass (kg) divided by the square of height (m2). Both fat mass index and lean mass index showed a positive, small to moderate relationship with all 24 hour BP components independently of age, sex, smoking, and leisure-time physical activity. There were no interaction effects between fat mass index and lean mass index on the mean BP levels. Adult lean body mass is a significant determinant of BP levels with an equal, albeit small to moderate magnitude as fat mass. Relatively high amount of muscle mass may not be beneficial to cardiovascular health.
  • Leppänen, Marja H.; Ray, Carola; Wennman, Heini; Alexandrou, Christina; Sääksjärvi, Katri; Koivusilta, Leena; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Roos, Eva (2019)
    Background: Recent 24-h movement guidelines for the early years established recommendations for physical activity (PA), screen time (ST), and sleep. To date, few studies have focused on compliance with meeting the guidelines and their associations with health outcomes. Thus, we aimed to investigate: 1) compliance with the 24-h movement guidelines, and 2) associations between compliance and anthropometry in Finnish preschoolers. Methods: We utilized DAGIS survey data that were collected in 2015-2016 (N = 864). PA was assessed 24 h/day over 7 days using a waist-worn ActiGraph wGT3X-BT accelerometer. ST and sleep were reported by the parents during the same 7 days. Anthropometry was assessed using body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) and waist circumference (WC, cm). Children were classified as meeting the guidelines if they averaged >= 180 min/day of PA, which consisted of >= 60 min of moderate-to-vigorous intensity; Results: Children were physically active on average 390 (+/- 46.2) min/day and spent 86 (+/- 25.5) min/day in moderate-to-vigorous PA. They spent 76 (+/- 37.4) min/day on ST and had on average 10:21 (+/- 0:33) h:min/day of sleep. The compliance rate in meeting all three movement guidelines overall was 24%. The highest compliance rate was found for PA (85%), followed by sleep (76%) and ST (35%). Meeting guidelines separately for PA or sleep, or for both, were associated with lower WC (PA: B = -1.37, p <0.001; Sleep: B = -0.72, p = 0.009; PA + Sleep: B = -1.03, p <0.001). In addition, meeting guidelines for sleep or for both PA and sleep were associated with lower BMI (Sleep: B = -0.26, p = 0.027; PA + Sleep: B = -0.30, p = 0.007). There were no significant associations found regarding ST. Conclusions: Meeting recommendations for PA and sleep may have an important role in supporting a healthy weight status in young children. However, there is still a need to improve compliance with the 24-h movement guidelines, especially for ST.
  • Leppänen, Marja H; Ray, Carola; Wennman, Heini; Alexandrou, Christina; Sääksjärvi, Katri; Koivusilta, Leena; Erkkola, Maijaliisa; Roos, Eva (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background Recent 24-h movement guidelines for the early years established recommendations for physical activity (PA), screen time (ST), and sleep. To date, few studies have focused on compliance with meeting the guidelines and their associations with health outcomes. Thus, we aimed to investigate: 1) compliance with the 24-h movement guidelines, and 2) associations between compliance and anthropometry in Finnish preschoolers. Methods We utilized DAGIS survey data that were collected in 2015–2016 (N = 864). PA was assessed 24 h/day over 7 days using a waist-worn ActiGraph wGT3X-BT accelerometer. ST and sleep were reported by the parents during the same 7 days. Anthropometry was assessed using body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and waist circumference (WC, cm). Children were classified as meeting the guidelines if they averaged ≥180 min/day of PA, which consisted of ≥60 min of moderate-to-vigorous intensity; ≤60 min/day of ST; and 10–13 h/day of sleep. In total, 778 children (51% boys, mean age: 4.7 ± 0.9 years) were included in the study. The compliance with meeting the 24-h movement guidelines was calculated for each behavior separately and in combinations. Adjusted linear regression analyses were applied to examine associations of compliance with BMI and WC. Results Children were physically active on average 390 (±46.2) min/day and spent 86 (±25.5) min/day in moderate-to-vigorous PA. They spent 76 (±37.4) min/day on ST and had on average 10:21 (±0:33) h:min/day of sleep. The compliance rate in meeting all three movement guidelines overall was 24%. The highest compliance rate was found for PA (85%), followed by sleep (76%) and ST (35%). Meeting guidelines separately for PA or sleep, or for both, were associated with lower WC (PA: B = -1.37, p < 0.001; Sleep: B = -0.72, p = 0.009; PA + Sleep: B = -1.03, p < 0.001). In addition, meeting guidelines for sleep or for both PA and sleep were associated with lower BMI (Sleep: B = -0.26, p = 0.027; PA + Sleep: B = -0.30, p = 0.007). There were no significant associations found regarding ST. Conclusions Meeting recommendations for PA and sleep may have an important role in supporting a healthy weight status in young children. However, there is still a need to improve compliance with the 24-h movement guidelines, especially for ST.
  • Vehmeijer, Florianne O. L.; Kuepers, Leanne K.; Sharp, Gemma C.; Salas, Lucas A.; Lent, Samantha; Jima, Dereje D.; Tindula, Gwen; Reese, Sarah; Qi, Cancan; Gruzieva, Olena; Page, Christian; Rezwan, Faisal; Melton, Philip E.; Nohr, Ellen; Escaramis, Georgia; Rzehak, Peter; Heiskala, Anni; Gong, Tong; Tuominen, Samuli T.; Gao, Lu; Ross, Jason P.; Starling, Anne P.; Holloway, John W.; Yousefi, Paul; Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Beilin, Lawrence J.; Bergstrom, Anna; Binder, Elisabeth; Chatzi, Leda; Corpeleijn, Eva; Czamara, Darina; Eskenazi, Brenda; Ewart, Susan; Ferre, Natalia; Grote, Veit; Gruszfeld, Dariusz; Haberg, Siri E.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Huen, Karen; Karlsson, Robert; Kull, Inger; Langhendries, Jean-Paul; Lepeule, Johanna; Magnus, Maria C.; Maguire, Rachel L.; Molloy, Peter L.; Monnereau, Claire; Mori, Trevor A.; Oken, Emily; Räikkönen, Katri; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl; Ruiz-Arenas, Carlos; Sebert, Sylvain; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; Verduci, Elvira; Vonk, Judith M.; Xu, Cheng-jian; Yang, Ivana; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Weiming; Karmaus, Wilfried; Dabelea, Dana; Muhlhausler, Beverly S.; Breton, Carrie; Lahti, Jari; Almqvist, Catarina; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Koletzko, Berthold; Vrijheid, Martine; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Huang, Rae-Chi; Arshad, Syed Hasan; Nystad, Wenche; Melen, Erik; Koppelman, Gerard H.; London, Stephanie J.; Holland, Nina; Bustamante, Mariona; Murphy, Susan K.; Hivert, Marie-France; Baccarelli, Andrea; Relton, Caroline L.; Snieder, Harold; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Felix, Janine F. (2020)
    Background DNA methylation has been shown to be associated with adiposity in adulthood. However, whether similar DNA methylation patterns are associated with childhood and adolescent body mass index (BMI) is largely unknown. More insight into this relationship at younger ages may have implications for future prevention of obesity and its related traits. Methods We examined whether DNA methylation in cord blood and whole blood in childhood and adolescence was associated with BMI in the age range from 2 to 18 years using both cross-sectional and longitudinal models. We performed meta-analyses of epigenome-wide association studies including up to 4133 children from 23 studies. We examined the overlap of findings reported in previous studies in children and adults with those in our analyses and calculated enrichment. Results DNA methylation at three CpGs (cg05937453, cg25212453, and cg10040131), each in a different age range, was associated with BMI at Bonferroni significance, P <1.06 x 10(-7), with a 0.96 standard deviation score (SDS) (standard error (SE) 0.17), 0.32 SDS (SE 0.06), and 0.32 BMI SDS (SE 0.06) higher BMI per 10% increase in methylation, respectively. DNA methylation at nine additional CpGs in the cross-sectional childhood model was associated with BMI at false discovery rate significance. The strength of the associations of DNA methylation at the 187 CpGs previously identified to be associated with adult BMI, increased with advancing age across childhood and adolescence in our analyses. In addition, correlation coefficients between effect estimates for those CpGs in adults and in children and adolescents also increased. Among the top findings for each age range, we observed increasing enrichment for the CpGs that were previously identified in adults (birth P-enrichment = 1; childhood P-enrichment = 2.00 x 10(-4); adolescence P-enrichment = 2.10 x 10(-7)). Conclusions There were only minimal associations of DNA methylation with childhood and adolescent BMI. With the advancing age of the participants across childhood and adolescence, we observed increasing overlap with altered DNA methylation loci reported in association with adult BMI. These findings may be compatible with the hypothesis that DNA methylation differences are mostly a consequence rather than a cause of obesity.
  • Vehmeijer, Florianne O L; Küpers, Leanne K; Sharp, Gemma C; Salas, Lucas A; Lent, Samantha; Jima, Dereje D; Tindula, Gwen; Reese, Sarah; Qi, Cancan; Gruzieva, Olena; Page, Christian; Rezwan, Faisal I; Melton, Philip E; Nohr, Ellen; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Rzehak, Peter; Heiskala, Anni; Gong, Tong; Tuominen, Samuli T; Gao, Lu; Ross, Jason P; Starling, Anne P; Holloway, John W; Yousefi, Paul; Aasvang, Gunn M; Beilin, Lawrence J; Bergström, Anna; Binder, Elisabeth; Chatzi, Leda; Corpeleijn, Eva; Czamara, Darina; Eskenazi, Brenda; Ewart, Susan; Ferre, Natalia; Grote, Veit; Gruszfeld, Dariusz; Håberg, Siri E; Hoyo, Cathrine; Huen, Karen; Karlsson, Robert; Kull, Inger; Langhendries, Jean-Paul; Lepeule, Johanna; Magnus, Maria C; Maguire, Rachel L; Molloy, Peter L; Monnereau, Claire; Mori, Trevor A; Oken, Emily; Räikkönen, Katri; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl; Ruiz-Arenas, Carlos; Sebert, Sylvain; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; Verduci, Elvira; Vonk, Judith M; Xu, Cheng-jian; Yang, Ivana V; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Weiming; Karmaus, Wilfried; Dabelea, Dana; Muhlhausler, Beverly S; Breton, Carrie V; Lahti, Jari; Almqvist, Catarina; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Koletzko, Berthold; Vrijheid, Martine; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Huang, Rae-Chi; Arshad, Syed H; Nystad, Wenche; Melén, Erik; Koppelman, Gerard H; London, Stephanie J; Holland, Nina; Bustamante, Mariona; Murphy, Susan K; Hivert, Marie-France; Baccarelli, Andrea; Relton, Caroline L; Snieder, Harold; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Felix, Janine F (BioMed Central, 2020)
    Abstract Background DNA methylation has been shown to be associated with adiposity in adulthood. However, whether similar DNA methylation patterns are associated with childhood and adolescent body mass index (BMI) is largely unknown. More insight into this relationship at younger ages may have implications for future prevention of obesity and its related traits. Methods We examined whether DNA methylation in cord blood and whole blood in childhood and adolescence was associated with BMI in the age range from 2 to 18 years using both cross-sectional and longitudinal models. We performed meta-analyses of epigenome-wide association studies including up to 4133 children from 23 studies. We examined the overlap of findings reported in previous studies in children and adults with those in our analyses and calculated enrichment. Results DNA methylation at three CpGs (cg05937453, cg25212453, and cg10040131), each in a different age range, was associated with BMI at Bonferroni significance, P < 1.06 × 10−7, with a 0.96 standard deviation score (SDS) (standard error (SE) 0.17), 0.32 SDS (SE 0.06), and 0.32 BMI SDS (SE 0.06) higher BMI per 10% increase in methylation, respectively. DNA methylation at nine additional CpGs in the cross-sectional childhood model was associated with BMI at false discovery rate significance. The strength of the associations of DNA methylation at the 187 CpGs previously identified to be associated with adult BMI, increased with advancing age across childhood and adolescence in our analyses. In addition, correlation coefficients between effect estimates for those CpGs in adults and in children and adolescents also increased. Among the top findings for each age range, we observed increasing enrichment for the CpGs that were previously identified in adults (birth Penrichment = 1; childhood Penrichment = 2.00 × 10−4; adolescence Penrichment = 2.10 × 10−7). Conclusions There were only minimal associations of DNA methylation with childhood and adolescent BMI. With the advancing age of the participants across childhood and adolescence, we observed increasing overlap with altered DNA methylation loci reported in association with adult BMI. These findings may be compatible with the hypothesis that DNA methylation differences are mostly a consequence rather than a cause of obesity.
  • Bogl, Leonie H.; Jelenkovic, Aline; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Ahrenfeldt, Linda; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Stazi, Maria A.; Fagnani, Corrado; D'Ippolito, Cristina; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Jeong, Hoe-Uk; Silberg, Judy L.; Eaves, Lindon J.; Maes, Hermine H.; Bayasgalan, Gombojav; Narandalai, Danshiitsoodol; Cutler, Tessa L.; Kandler, Christian; Jang, Kerry L.; Christensen, Kaare; Skytthe, Axel; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Cozen, Wendy; Hwang, Amie E.; Mack, Thomas M.; Derom, Catherine A.; Vlietinck, Robert F.; Nelson, Tracy L.; Whitfield, Keith E.; Corley, Robin P.; Huibregtse, Brooke M.; McAdams, Tom A.; Eley, Thalia C.; Gregory, Alice M.; Krueger, Robert F.; Mcgue, Matt; Pahlen, Shandell; Willemsen, Gonneke; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C. E. M.; Pang, Zengchang; Tan, Qihua; Zhang, Dongfeng; Martin, Nicholas G.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hjelmborg, Jacob van B.; Rebato, Esther; Swan, Gary E.; Krasnow, Ruth; Busjahn, Andreas; Lichtenstein, Paul; Oncel, Sevgi Y.; Aliev, Fazil; Baker, Laura A.; Tuvblad, Catherine; Siribaddana, Sisira H.; Hotopf, Matthew; Sumathipala, Athula; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Aslan, Anna K. Dahl; Ordonana, Juan R.; Sanchez-Romera, Juan F.; Colodro-Conde, Lucia; Duncan, Glen E.; Buchwald, Dedra; Tarnoki, Adam D.; Tarnoki, David L.; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Hopper, John L.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Silventoinen, Karri; Kaprio, Jaakko (2017)
    Background: The comparison of traits in twins from opposite-sex (OS) and same-sex (SS) dizygotic twin pairs is considered a proxy measure of prenatal hormone exposure. To examine possible prenatal hormonal influences on anthropometric traits, we compared mean height, body mass index (BMI), and the prevalence of being overweight or obese between men and women from OS and SS dizygotic twin pairs. Methods: The data were derived from the COllaborative project of Development of Anthropometrical measures in Twins (CODATwins) database, and included 68,494 SS and 53,808 OS dizygotic twin individuals above the age of 20 years from 31 twin cohorts representing 19 countries. Zygosity was determined by questionnaires or DNA genotyping depending on the study. Multiple regression and logistic regression models adjusted for cohort, age, and birth year with the twin type as a predictor were carried out to compare height and BMI in twins from OS pairs with those from SS pairs and to calculate the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for being overweight or obese. Results: OS females were, on average, 0.31 cm (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20, 0.41) taller than SS females. OS males were also, on average, taller than SS males, but this difference was only 0.14 cm (95% CI 0.02, 0.27). Mean BMI and the prevalence of overweight or obesity did not differ between males and females from SS and OS twin pairs. The statistically significant differences between OS and SS twins for height were small and appeared to reflect our large sample size rather than meaningful differences of public health relevance. Conclusions: We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that prenatal hormonal exposure or postnatal socialization (i.e., having grown up with a twin of the opposite sex) has a major impact on height and BMI in adulthood.
  • Bogl, Leonie H.; Jelenkovic, Aline; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Ahrenfeldt, Linda; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Stazi, Maria A; Fagnani, Corrado; D’Ippolito, Cristina; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Jeong, Hoe-Uk; Silberg, Judy L; Eaves, Lindon J; Maes, Hermine H; Bayasgalan, Gombojav; Narandalai, Danshiitsoodol; Cutler, Tessa L; Kandler, Christian; Jang, Kerry L; Christensen, Kaare; Skytthe, Axel; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Cozen, Wendy; Hwang, Amie E; Mack, Thomas M; Derom, Catherine A; Vlietinck, Robert F; Nelson, Tracy L; Whitfield, Keith E; Corley, Robin P; Huibregtse, Brooke M; McAdams, Tom A; Eley, Thalia C; Gregory, Alice M; Krueger, Robert F; McGue, Matt; Pahlen, Shandell; Willemsen, Gonneke; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C E M; Pang, Zengchang; Tan, Qihua; Zhang, Dongfeng; Martin, Nicholas G; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Hjelmborg, Jacob v. B.; Rebato, Esther; Swan, Gary E; Krasnow, Ruth; Busjahn, Andreas; Lichtenstein, Paul; Öncel, Sevgi Y; Aliev, Fazil; Baker, Laura A; Tuvblad, Catherine; Siribaddana, Sisira H; Hotopf, Matthew; Sumathipala, Athula; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Aslan, Anna K D; Ordoñana, Juan R; Sánchez-Romera, Juan F; Colodro-Conde, Lucia; Duncan, Glen E; Buchwald, Dedra; Tarnoki, Adam D; Tarnoki, David L; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Hopper, John L.; Loos, Ruth J F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Silventoinen, Karri; Kaprio, Jaakko (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background The comparison of traits in twins from opposite-sex (OS) and same-sex (SS) dizygotic twin pairs is considered a proxy measure of prenatal hormone exposure. To examine possible prenatal hormonal influences on anthropometric traits, we compared mean height, body mass index (BMI), and the prevalence of being overweight or obese between men and women from OS and SS dizygotic twin pairs. Methods The data were derived from the COllaborative project of Development of Anthropometrical measures in Twins (CODATwins) database, and included 68,494 SS and 53,808 OS dizygotic twin individuals above the age of 20 years from 31 twin cohorts representing 19 countries. Zygosity was determined by questionnaires or DNA genotyping depending on the study. Multiple regression and logistic regression models adjusted for cohort, age, and birth year with the twin type as a predictor were carried out to compare height and BMI in twins from OS pairs with those from SS pairs and to calculate the adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for being overweight or obese. Results OS females were, on average, 0.31 cm (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20, 0.41) taller than SS females. OS males were also, on average, taller than SS males, but this difference was only 0.14 cm (95% CI 0.02, 0.27). Mean BMI and the prevalence of overweight or obesity did not differ between males and females from SS and OS twin pairs. The statistically significant differences between OS and SS twins for height were small and appeared to reflect our large sample size rather than meaningful differences of public health relevance. Conclusions We found no evidence to support the hypothesis that prenatal hormonal exposure or postnatal socialization (i.e., having grown up with a twin of the opposite sex) has a major impact on height and BMI in adulthood.
  • Engberg, Elina; Figueiredo, Rejane A.O.; Rounge, Trine B.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Viljakainen, Heli (2020)
    Purpose We aimed to examine whether sedentary screen time changes when transitioning from childhood to adolescence and whether children's screen time, separately for school days and weekends, affects body mass index (BMI) in adolescents. Methods This prospective 3-year follow-up study included 5,084 children with a mean (standard deviation) age of 11 (1) years at baseline and 14 (1) years at follow-up. Children reported screen time, more specifically, time spent viewing TV programs and using a computer outside school while sitting. We categorized children into light, medium, and heavy TV viewers and computer users separately for school days and weekends. We also calculated the age- and gender-specific BMI z-score (BMIz). Results Time spent viewing TV changed from baseline to follow-up on school days and on weekends (p <.001 for both); the proportion of heavy TV viewers on school days (≥3 h/d) increased from 16% to 23% and on weekends (≥4 h/d) from 19% to 30%. Heavy TV viewers and computer users on both school days and on weekends had a higher BMIz 3 years later (p <.001 for all). After adjusting for age, gender, language, baseline BMIz, sleep duration, eating habits, exercise, and the other screen-time variables, heavy TV viewing on weekends remained significantly associated with an increased BMIz at follow-up (B = .078; p = .013). Conclusions The proportion of heavy screen users increases when transitioning from childhood to adolescence. Moreover, heavy screen use, especially on weekends in 11-year-old children, is associated with an increased BMI 3 years later.
  • Loponen, Tiina; Lallukka, Tea; Holstila, Ansku; Lahti, Jouni (2015)
    Background: Physical activity level and overweight have shown associations with mental health problems but it is not known whether the risk of mental health problems due to overweight varies by physical activity. We examined joint association of physical activity and overweight with subsequent psychotropic medication among 40-60-year-old employees. Methods: The questionnaire survey data were derived from Helsinki Health Study baseline postal questionnaires in 2000-02 among employees of the City of Helsinki aged 40-60 years (n = 8960, response rate 67 %). Baseline survey data were linked with prospective register data on prescribed psychotropic medication (ATC-codes N05 and N06, except N06D) among those with written consent (74 %) for such linkage. The analyses included 6169 responders (78 % women, corresponding to the target population). We divided participants into six groups according to their baseline self-reported body mass index and leisure-time physical activity using physically highly active normal-weight participants as a reference group. We used Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, psychotropic medication prior to baseline, and socioeconomic position, marital status, working conditions, limiting long-standing illness, alcohol use, and smoking. Results: At baseline, 49 % were overweight and 23 % were physically inactive. After adjusting for age and gender, inactive normal-weight (hazard ratio (HR) 1.3, 95 % CI 1.1-1.5), moderately active overweight (HR 1.3, 95 % CI 1.1-1.5) and inactive overweight (HR 1.4, 95 % CI 1.2-1.6) had higher risk for any psychotropic medication compared with group of highly active normal-weight. After adjusting for prior medication, only the inactive overweight group had higher risk (HR 1.4, 95 % CI 1.2-1.6). Other covariates made but a minor contribution to the examined associations. For antidepressants the associations were somewhat stronger than for sedatives. Conclusions: Both normal-weight and physical activity help prevent psychotropic medication but physical activity dominates the association over normal-weight.
  • Kumpulainen, Satu M.; Heinonen, Kati; Kaseva, Nina; Andersson, Sture; Lano, Aulikki; Reynolds, Rebecca M.; Wolke, Dieter; Kajantie, Eero; Eriksson, Johan G.; Räikkönen, Katri (2019)
    Background Maternal early pregnancy overweight (body mass index [BMI] 25.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI >= 30 kg/m(2)) are associated with mental and physical health adversities in the offspring. Prenatal programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been put forward as one of the mechanisms that may play pathophysiological role. However, evidence linking maternal overweight and obesity with offspring HPA-axis activity is scarce. We studied if maternal early pregnancy BMI is associated with diurnal salivary cortisol, a marker of HPA-axis activity, in young adult offspring. Methods At a mean age of 25.3 (standard deviation [SD) = 0.6) years, 653 Arvo Ylppo Longitudinal Study participants collected saliva samples for cortisol analyses, at awakening, 15 and 30 min thereafter, 10:30AM, 12:00PM, 5:30PM and at bedtime. Maternal BMI was calculated from weight and height verified by a measurement in the first antenatal clinic visit before 12 weeks of gestation derived from healthcare records. Results Per each one kg/m(2) higher maternal early pregnancy BMI offspring diurnal average salivary cortisol was -1.4% (95% CI:-2.6, -0.2, p(FDR) = 0.033) lower, at awakening it was -2.4% (95% CI:-4.0, -0.7, p(FDR) = 0.025) lower and the morning average salivary cortisol was -2.0% (95% CI:-3.4,-0.5, p(FDR) = 0.017) lower. These associations were independent of the offspring's own young adulthood BMI, and other important covariates. Conclusion Our findings show that young adult offspring born to mothers with higher early pregnancy BMI show lower average levels of diurnal cortisol, especially in the morning. Whether these findings reflect prenatal programming of the offspring HPA-axis activity warrants further investigation.
  • Ivanovski, Ivan; Djuric, Olivera; Broccoli, Serena; Caraffi, Stefano Giuseppe; Accorsi, Patrizia; Adam, Margaret P.; Avela, Kristiina; Badura-Stronka, Magdalena; Bayat, Allan; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Cocco, Isabella; Cordelli, Duccio Maria; Cuturilo, Goran; Di Pisa, Veronica; Garcia, Juliette Dupont; Gastaldi, Roberto; Giordano, Lucio; Guala, Andrea; Hoei-Hansen, Christina; Inaba, Mie; Iodice, Alessandro; Nielsen, Jens Erik Klint; Kuburovic, Vladimir; Lazalde-Medina, Brissia; Malbora, Baris; Mizuno, Seiji; Moldovan, Oana; Moller, Rikke S.; Muschke, Petra; Otelli, Valeria; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Piscopo, Carmelo; Poch-Olive, Maria Luisa; Prpic, Igor; Reina, Purificacion Marin; Raviglione, Federico; Ricci, Emilia; Scarano, Emanuela; Simonte, Graziella; Smigiel, Robert; Tanteles, George; Tarani, Luigi; Trimouille, Aurelien; Valera, Elvis Terci; Vergano, Samantha Schrier; Writzl, Karin; Callewaert, Bert; Savasta, Salvatore; Street, Maria Elisabeth; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Bernasconi, Sergio; Rossi, Paolo Giorgi; Garavelli, Livia (2020)
    Background Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS; OMIM #235730) is a genetic condition caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions of theZEB2gene. It is characterized by moderate-severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, Hirschsprung disease and multiple organ malformations of which congenital heart defects and urogenital anomalies are the most frequent ones. To date, a clear description of the physical development of MWS patients does not exist. The aim of this study is to provide up-to-date growth charts specific for infants and children with MWS. Charts for males and females aged from 0 to 16 years were generated using a total of 2865 measurements from 99 MWS patients of different ancestries. All data were collected through extensive collaborations with the Italian MWS association (AIMW) and the MWS Foundation. The GAMLSS package for the R statistical computing software was used to model the growth charts. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and head circumference were compared to those from standard international growth charts for healthy children. Results In newborns, weight and length were distributed as in the general population, while head circumference was slightly smaller, with an average below the 30th centile. Up to the age of 7 years, weight and height distribution was shifted to slightly lower values than in the general population; after that, the difference increased further, with 50% of the affected children below the 5th centile of the general population. BMI distribution was similar to that of non-affected children until the age of 7 years, at which point values in MWS children increased with a less steep slope, particularly in males. Microcephaly was sometimes present at birth, but in most cases it developed gradually during infancy; many children had a small head circumference, between the 3rd and the 10th centile, rather than being truly microcephalic (at least 2 SD below the mean). Most patients were of slender build. Conclusions These charts contribute to the understanding of the natural history of MWS and should assist pediatricians and other caregivers in providing optimal care to MWS individuals who show problems related to physical growth. This is the first study on growth in patients with MWS.
  • Rautava, Samuli; Turta, Olli; Vahtera, Jussi; Pentti, Jaana; Kivimäki, Mika; Pearce, Jamie; Kawachi, Ichiro; Rautava, Paivi; Lagström, Hanna (2022)
    Background: The epidemic of increasing childhood overweight and obesity is a major global health concern, with local contextual factors identified as possible contributors. Robust research is needed to establish an evidence base supporting health policy decisions to reverse the trend. We aimed to examine the association between neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage and trajectories of body mass index (BMI) from birth to age 7. Methods: The present study included 11,023 children born within the Southwest Finland Birth Cohort who were free of severe conditions affecting growth with adequate exposure and growth data. We obtained child growth data until school age from municipal follow-up clinics. We based cumulative childhood neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage on the average annual income, unemployment, and level of education in a residential area defined using a geographic grid at a spatial resolution of 250 m by 250 m. Results: Cumulative neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with distinct childhood BMI z score trajectories from birth to age 7. Despite being born in the lowest BMI z scores, children growing up in disadvantaged neighborhoods subsequently exhibited a trajectory of increasing BMI z scores starting at 4 years of age, ending up with a higher risk of overweight at the end of the follow-up (30%) as compared with children living in more affluent neighborhoods (22%). The corresponding risk of obesity was 5 % for those in affluent neighborhoods and 9 % and those in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Conclusion: Cumulative exposure to neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is independently associated with unfavorable BMI development and obesity in childhood.