Browsing by Subject "Breast cancer"

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  • Ojala, K.; Meretoja, T. J.; Leidenius, M. H. K. (2017)
    Background: Recent studies implicate that oncoplastic breast cancer surgery provides better aesthetic outcome than conventional resection. Several factors have been associated with poor aesthetic outcome. This study aims to compare patient-reported aesthetic and functional outcome after conventional and oncoplastic resection and to evaluate prognostic factors for poor aesthetic outcome in a population based setting. Methods: 637 patients having breast conserving treatment (BCT) due to unilateral primary breast cancer at a single hospital district during 2010 were included. Aesthetic and functional outcome were evaluated using two questionnaires three years after surgery. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 379 (59%) patients; 293 (77%) of these had conventional and 86 (23%) oncoplastic resection. Patients in oncoplastic resection group had larger tumour diameter (p <0.001), larger resection specimens (p <0.001), and more often multifocal tumours-(p = 0.032), node positive cancer (p = 0.029) and lower quadrant tumour localization (p = 0.007). Aesthetic outcome according to BCTOS questionnaire was good in 284 (75%) patients; 52 (61%) patients in the oncoplastic group and 230 patients (81%) in the conventional resection group, p <0.001. Larger tumour diameter (p = 0.033), multifocality (p = 0.022), weight of resection specimen ( Conclusions: Patient satisfaction to aesthetic outcome after BCT is high. Conventional resection provides good aesthetic outcome in appropriately selected patients. Oncoplastic resection enables BCT in patients with larger and multifocal tumours with favourable aesthetic outcome. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO similar to The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.
  • Varga, Zsuzsanna; Lebeau, Annette; Bu, Hong; Hartmann, Arndt; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Schraml, Peter; Symmans, Fraser; Stoehr, Robert; Teng, Xiaodong; Turzynski, Andreas; von Wasielewski, Reinhard; Guertler, Claudia; Laible, Mark; Schlombs, Kornelia; Joensuu, Heikki; Keller, Thomas; Sinn, Peter; Sahin, Ugur; Bartlett, John; Viale, Giuseppe (2017)
    Background: Accurate determination of the predictive markers human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/ERBB2), estrogen receptor (ER/ESR1), progesterone receptor (PgR/PGR), and marker of proliferation Ki67 (MKI67) is indispensable for therapeutic decision making in early breast cancer. In this multicenter prospective study, we addressed the issue of inter- and intrasite reproducibility using the recently developed reverse transcription-quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction-based MammaTyper (R) test. Methods: Ten international pathology institutions participated in this study and determined messenger RNA expression levels of ERBB2, ESR1, PGR, and MKI67 in both centrally and locally extracted RNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast cancer specimens with the MammaTyper (R) test. Samples were measured repeatedly on different days within the local laboratories, and reproducibility was assessed by means of variance component analysis, Fleiss' kappa statistics, and interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Results: Total variations in measurements of centrally and locally prepared RNA extracts were comparable; therefore, statistical analyses were performed on the complete dataset. Intersite reproducibility showed total SDs between 0.21 and 0.44 for the quantitative single-marker assessments, resulting in ICC values of 0.980-0.998, demonstrating excellent agreement of quantitative measurements. Also, the reproducibility of binary single-marker results (positive/negative), as well as the molecular subtype agreement, was almost perfect with kappa values ranging from 0.90 to 1.00. Conclusions: On the basis of these data, the MammaTyper (R) has the potential to substantially improve the current standards of breast cancer diagnostics by providing a highly precise and reproducible quantitative assessment of the established breast cancer biomarkers and molecular subtypes in a decentralized workup.
  • Sobral-Leite, Marcelo; Wesseling, Jelle; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Miltenburg, Martine H.; Sanders, Joyce; Hofland, Ingrid; Blows, Fiona M.; Coulson, Penny; Patrycja, Gazinska; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Fagerholm, Rainer; Heikkila, Paivi; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Visscher, Daniel; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van de Water, Bob; Broeks, Annegien; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; de Graauw, Marjo; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; kConFab AOCS Investigators (2015)
    Background: Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a protein related with the carcinogenesis process and metastasis formation in many tumors. However, little is known about the prognostic value of ANXA1 in breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between ANXA1 expression, BRCA1/2 germline carriership, specific tumor subtypes and survival in breast cancer patients. Methods: Clinical-pathological information and follow-up data were collected from nine breast cancer studies from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) (n = 5,752) and from one study of familial breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations (n = 107). ANXA1 expression was scored based on the percentage of immunohistochemical staining in tumor cells. Survival analyses were performed using a multivariable Cox model. Results: The frequency of ANXA1 positive tumors was higher in familial breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations than in BCAC patients, with 48.6 % versus 12.4 %, respectively; P <0.0001. ANXA1 was also highly expressed in BCAC tumors that were poorly differentiated, triple negative, EGFR-CK5/6 positive or had developed in patients at a young age. In the first 5 years of follow-up, patients with ANXA1 positive tumors had a worse breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) than ANXA1 negative (HRadj = 1.35; 95 % CI = 1.05-1.73), but the association weakened after 10 years (HRadj = 1.13; 95 % CI = 0.91-1.40). ANXA1 was a significant independent predictor of survival in HER2+ patients (10-years BCSS: HRadj = 1.70; 95 % CI = 1.17-2.45). Conclusions: ANXA1 is overexpressed in familial breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations and correlated with poor prognosis features: triple negative and poorly differentiated tumors. ANXA1 might be a biomarker candidate for breast cancer survival prediction in high risk groups such as HER2+ cases.
  • Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B.; Pastinen, Tomi; Droit, Arnaud; Lemacon, Audrey; Adlard, Julian; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K.; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bane, Anita; Barjhoux, Laure; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berthet, Pascaline; Blok, Marinus J.; Bobolis, Kristie; Bonadona, Valerie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R.; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S.; Caligo, Maria A.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; De la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Nevanlinna, Heli; EMBRACE; GEMO Study Collaborators; HEBON; KConFab Investigators (2017)
    Cis-acting regulatory SNPs resulting in differential allelic expression (DAE) may, in part, explain the underlying phenotypic variation associated with many complex diseases. To investigate whether common variants associated with DAE were involved in breast cancer susceptibility among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of similar to 320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most significant SNP rs228595 p = 7 x 10(-6)). This association was absent in BRCA2 carriers (p = 0.57). The 11q22.3 region notably encompasses genes such as ACAT1, NPAT, and ATM. Expression quantitative trait loci associations were observed in both normal breast and tumors across this region, namely for ACAT1, ATM, and other genes. In silico analysis revealed some overlap between top risk-associated SNPs and relevant biological features in mammary cell data, which suggests potential functional significance. We identified 11q22.3 as a new modifier locus in BRCA1 carriers. Replication in larger studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.
  • Hultsch, Susanne; Kankainen, Matti; Paavolainen, Lassi; Kovanen, Ruusu-Maaria; Ikonen, Elina; Kangaspeska, Sara; Pietiäinen, Vilja; Kallioniemi, Olli (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Tamoxifen treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer reduces mortality by 31%. However, over half of advanced ER-positive breast cancers are intrinsically resistant to tamoxifen and about 40% will acquire the resistance during the treatment. Methods In order to explore mechanisms underlying endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer and to identify new therapeutic opportunities, we created tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines that represent the luminal A or the luminal B. Gene expression patterns revealed by RNA-sequencing in seven tamoxifen-resistant variants were compared with their isogenic parental cells. We further examined those transcriptomic alterations in a publicly available patient cohort. Results We show that tamoxifen resistance cannot simply be explained by altered expression of individual genes, common mechanism across all resistant variants, or the appearance of new fusion genes. Instead, the resistant cell lines shared altered gene expression patterns associated with cell cycle, protein modification and metabolism, especially with the cholesterol pathway. In the tamoxifen-resistant T-47D cell variants we observed a striking increase of neutral lipids in lipid droplets as well as an accumulation of free cholesterol in the lysosomes. Tamoxifen-resistant cells were also less prone to lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and not vulnerable to compounds targeting the lipid metabolism. However, the cells were sensitive to disulfiram, LCS-1, and dasatinib. Conclusion Altogether, our findings highlight a major role of LMP prevention in tamoxifen resistance, and suggest novel drug vulnerabilities associated with this phenotype.
  • Hultsch, Susanne; Kankainen, Matti; Paavolainen, Lassi; Kovanen, Ruusu-Maaria; Ikonen, Elina; Kangaspeska, Sara; Pietiäinen, Vilja; Kallioniemi, Olli (2018)
    Background: Tamoxifen treatment of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer reduces mortality by 31%. However, over half of advanced ER-positive breast cancers are intrinsically resistant to tamoxifen and about 40% will acquire the resistance during the treatment. Methods: In order to explore mechanisms underlying endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer and to identify new therapeutic opportunities, we created tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell lines that represent the luminal A or the luminal B. Gene expression patterns revealed by RNA-sequencing in seven tamoxifen-resistant variants were compared with their isogenic parental cells. We further examined those transcriptomic alterations in a publicly available patient cohort Results: We show that tamoxifen resistance cannot simply be explained by altered expression of individual genes, common mechanism across all resistant variants, or the appearance of new fusion genes. Instead, the resistant cell lines shared altered gene expression patterns associated with cell cycle, protein modification and metabolism, especially with the cholesterol pathway. In the tamoxifen-resistant T-47D cell variants we observed a striking increase of neutral lipids in lipid droplets as well as an accumulation of free cholesterol in the lysosomes. Tamoxifen-resistant cells were also less prone to lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and not vulnerable to compounds targeting the lipid metabolism. However, the cells were sensitive to disulfiram, LCS-1, and dasatinib. Conclusion: Altogether, our findings highlight a major role of LMP prevention in tamoxifen resistance, and suggest novel drug vulnerabilities associated with this phenotype.
  • Wirtz, Ralph M.; Sihto, Harri; Isola, Jorma; Heikkila, Paivi; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Auvinen, Paivi; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Jyrkkio, Sirkku; Lakis, Sotiris; Schlombs, Kornelia; Laible, Mark; Weber, Stefan; Eidt, Sebastian; Sahin, Ugur; Joensuu, Heikki (2016)
    The biological subtype of breast cancer influences the selection of systemic therapy. Distinction between luminal A and B cancers depends on consistent assessment of Ki-67, but substantial intra-observer and inter-observer variability exists when immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used. We compared RT-qPCR with IHC in the assessment of Ki-67 and other standard factors used in breast cancer subtyping. RNA was extracted from archival breast tumour tissue of 769 women randomly assigned to the FinHer trial. Cancer ESR1, PGR, ERBB2 and MKI67 mRNA content was quantitated with an RT-qPCR assay. Local pathologists assessed ER, PgR and Ki-67 expression using IHC. HER2 amplification was identified with chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) centrally. The results were correlated with distant disease-free survival (DDFS) and overall survival (OS). qPCR-based and IHC-based assessments of ER and PgR showed good concordance. Both low tumour MKI67 mRNA (RT-qPCR) and Ki-67 protein (IHC) levels were prognostic for favourable DDFS [hazard ratio (HR) 0.42, 95 % CI 0.25-0.71, P = 0.001; and HR 0.56, 0.37-0.84, P = 0.005, respectively] and OS. In multivariable analyses, cancer MKI67 mRNA content had independent influence on DDFS (adjusted HR 0.51, 95 % CI 0.29-0.89, P = 0.019) while Ki-67 protein expression had not any influence (P = 0.266) whereas both assessments influenced independently OS. Luminal B patients treated with docetaxel-FEC had more favourable DDFS and OS than those treated with vinorelbine-FEC when the subtype was defined by RT-qPCR (for DDFS, HR 0.52, 95 % CI 0.29-0.94, P = 0.031), but not when defined using IHC. Breast cancer subtypes approximated with RT-qPCR and IHC show good concordance, but cancer MKI67 mRNA content correlated slightly better with DDFS than Ki-67 expression. The findings based on MKI67 mRNA content suggest that patients with luminal B cancer benefit more from docetaxel-FEC than from vinorelbine-FEC.
  • Turkki, Riku; Byckhov, Dmitrii; Lundin, Mikael; Isola, Jorma; Nordling, Stig; Kovanen, Panu E.; Verrill, Clare; von Smitten, Karl; Joensuu, Heikki; Lundin, Johan; Linder, Nina (2019)
    PurposeRecent advances in machine learning have enabled better understanding of large and complex visual data. Here, we aim to investigate patient outcome prediction with a machine learning method using only an image of tumour sample as an input.MethodsUtilising tissue microarray (TMA) samples obtained from the primary tumour of patients (N=1299) within a nationwide breast cancer series with long-term-follow-up, we train and validate a machine learning method for patient outcome prediction. The prediction is performed by classifying samples into low or high digital risk score (DRS) groups. The outcome classifier is trained using sample images of 868 patients and evaluated and compared with human expert classification in a test set of 431 patients.ResultsIn univariate survival analysis, the DRS classification resulted in a hazard ratio of 2.10 (95% CI 1.33-3.32, p=0.001) for breast cancer-specific survival. The DRS classification remained as an independent predictor of breast cancer-specific survival in a multivariate Cox model with a hazard ratio of 2.04 (95% CI 1.20-3.44, p=0.007). The accuracy (C-index) of the DRS grouping was 0.60 (95% CI 0.55-0.65), as compared to 0.58 (95% CI 0.53-0.63) for human expert predictions based on the same TMA samples.ConclusionsOur findings demonstrate the feasibility of learning prognostic signals in tumour tissue images without domain knowledge. Although further validation is needed, our study suggests that machine learning algorithms can extract prognostically relevant information from tumour histology complementing the currently used prognostic factors in breast cancer.
  • Barok, Mark; Puhka, Maija; Vereb, Gyorgy; Szollosi, Janos; Isola, Jorma; Joensuu, Heikki (2018)
    Background: Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate that carries a cytotoxic drug (DM1) to HER2-positive cancer. The target of T-DM1 (HER2) is present also on cancer-derived exosomes. We hypothesized that exosome-bound T-DM1 may contribute to the activity of T-DM1. Methods: Exosomes were isolated from the cell culture medium of HER2-positive SKBR-3 and EFM-192A breast cancer cells, HER2-positive SNU-216 gastric cancer cells, and HER2-negative MCF-7 breast cancer cells by serial centrifugations including two ultracentrifugations, and treated with T-DM1. T-DM1 not bound to exosomes was removed using HER2-coated magnetic beads. Exosome samples were analyzed by electron microscopy, flow cytometry and Western blotting. Binding of T-DM1-containing exosomes to cancer cells and T-DM1 internalization were investigated with confocal microscopy. Effects of T-DM1-containg exosomes on cancer cells were investigated with the AlamarBlue cell proliferation assay and the Caspase-Glo 3/7 caspase activation assay. Results: T-DM1 binds to exosomes derived from HER2-positive cancer cells, but not to exosomes derived from HER2-negative MCF-7 cells. HER2-positive SKBR-3 cells accumulated T-DM1 after being treated with T-DM1-containg exosomes, and treatment of SKBR-3 and EFM-192A cells with T-DM1-containing exosomes resulted in growth inhibition and activation of caspases 3 and/or 7. Conclusion: T-DM1 binds to exosomes derived from HER2-positive cancer cells, and T-DM1 may be carried to other cancer cells via exosomes leading to reduced viability of the recipient cells. The results suggest a new mechanism of action for T-DM1, mediated by exosomes derived from HER2-positive cancer.
  • Barok, Mark; Puhka, Maija; Vereb, Gyorgy; Szollosi, Janos; Isola, Jorma; Joensuu, Heikki (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate that carries a cytotoxic drug (DM1) to HER2-positive cancer. The target of T-DM1 (HER2) is present also on cancer-derived exosomes. We hypothesized that exosome-bound T-DM1 may contribute to the activity of T-DM1. Methods Exosomes were isolated from the cell culture medium of HER2-positive SKBR-3 and EFM-192A breast cancer cells, HER2-positive SNU-216 gastric cancer cells, and HER2-negative MCF-7 breast cancer cells by serial centrifugations including two ultracentrifugations, and treated with T-DM1. T-DM1 not bound to exosomes was removed using HER2-coated magnetic beads. Exosome samples were analyzed by electron microscopy, flow cytometry and Western blotting. Binding of T-DM1-containing exosomes to cancer cells and T-DM1 internalization were investigated with confocal microscopy. Effects of T-DM1-containg exosomes on cancer cells were investigated with the AlamarBlue cell proliferation assay and the Caspase-Glo 3/7 caspase activation assay. Results T-DM1 binds to exosomes derived from HER2-positive cancer cells, but not to exosomes derived from HER2-negative MCF-7 cells. HER2-positive SKBR-3 cells accumulated T-DM1 after being treated with T-DM1-containg exosomes, and treatment of SKBR-3 and EFM-192A cells with T-DM1-containing exosomes resulted in growth inhibition and activation of caspases 3 and/or 7. Conclusion T-DM1 binds to exosomes derived from HER2-positive cancer cells, and T-DM1 may be carried to other cancer cells via exosomes leading to reduced viability of the recipient cells. The results suggest a new mechanism of action for T-DM1, mediated by exosomes derived from HER2-positive cancer.
  • Alhopuro, Pia; Vainionpää, Reetta; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pöyhönen, Minna (2020)
    Germline mutations in theBRCA1andBRCA2genes cause hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC). Mutations in these genes are usually inherited, and reports ofde novo BRCA1/2mutations are rare. To date, only one patient with low-levelBRCA1mutation mosaicism has been published. We report on a breast cancer patient with constitutional somatic mosaicism of aBRCA2mutation.BRCA2mutation c.9294C>G, p.(Tyr3098Ter) was detected in 20% of reads in DNA extracted from peripheral blood using next-generation sequencing (NGS). TheBRCA2mutation was subsequently observed at similar levels in normal breast tissue, adipose tissue, normal right fallopian tube tissue and ovaries of the patient, suggesting that this mutation occurred early in embryonic development. This is the first case to report constitutional mosaicism for aBRCA2mutation and shows thatBRCA2mosaicism can underlie early-onset breast cancer. NGS forBRCA1/2should be considered for patients whose tumors harbor aBRCA1/2mutation and for individuals suggestive of genetic predisposition but without a family history of HBO.
  • Sonnenblick, Amir; Brohee, Sylvain; Fumagalli, Debora; Vincent, Delphine; Venet, David; Ignatiadis, Michail; Salgado, Roberto; Van den Eynden, Gert; Rothe, Francoise; Desmedt, Christine; Neven, Patrick; Loibl, Sibylle; Denkert, Carsten; Joensuu, Heikki; Loi, Sherene; Sirtaine, Nicolas; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Piccart, Martine; Sotiriou, Christos (2015)
    Background: The likelihood of recurrence in patients with breast cancer who have HER2-positive tumors is relatively high, although trastuzumab is a remarkably effective drug in this setting. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 protein (STAT3), a transcription factor that is persistently tyrosine-705 phosphorylated (pSTAT3) in response to numerous oncogenic signaling pathways, activates downstream proliferative and anti-apoptotic pathways. We hypothesized that pSTAT3 expression in HER2-positive breast cancer will confer trastuzumab resistance. Methods: We integrated reverse phase protein array (RPPA) and gene expression data from patients with HER2-positive breast cancer treated with trastuzumab in the adjuvant setting. Results: We show that a pSTAT3-associated gene signature (pSTAT3-GS) is able to predict pSTAT3 status in an independent dataset (TCGA; AUC = 0.77, P = 0.02). This suggests that STAT3 induces a characteristic set of gene expression changes in HER2-positive cancers. Tumors characterized as high pSTAT3-GS were associated with trastuzumab resistance (log rank P = 0.049). These results were confirmed using data from the prospective, randomized controlled FinHer study, where the effect was especially prominent in HER2-positive estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors (interaction test P = 0.02). Of interest, constitutively activated pSTAT3 tumors were associated with loss of PTEN, elevated IL6, and stromal reactivation. Conclusions: This study provides compelling evidence for a link between pSTAT3 and trastuzumab resistance in HER2-positive primary breast cancers. Our results suggest that it may be valuable to add agents targeting the STAT3 pathway to trastuzumab for treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer.
  • Louhimo, Riku i; Laakso, Marko; Belitskin, Denis; Klefstrom, Juha; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hautaniemi, Sampsa (2016)
    Background: Genomic alterations affecting drug target proteins occur in several tumor types and are prime candidates for patient-specific tailored treatments. Increasingly, patients likely to benefit from targeted cancer therapy are selected based on molecular alterations. The selection of a precision therapy benefiting most patients is challenging but can be enhanced with integration of multiple types of molecular data. Data integration approaches for drug prioritization have successfully integrated diverse molecular data but do not take full advantage of existing data and literature. Results: We have built a knowledge-base which connects data from public databases with molecular results from over 2200 tumors, signaling pathways and drug-target databases. Moreover, we have developed a data mining algorithm to effectively utilize this heterogeneous knowledge-base. Our algorithm is designed to facilitate retargeting of existing drugs by stratifying samples and prioritizing drug targets. We analyzed 797 primary tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas breast and ovarian cancer cohorts using our framework. FGFR, CDK and HER2 inhibitors were prioritized in breast and ovarian data sets. Estrogen receptor positive breast tumors showed potential sensitivity to targeted inhibitors of FGFR due to activation of FGFR3. Conclusions: Our results suggest that computational sample stratification selects potentially sensitive samples for targeted therapies and can aid in precision medicine drug repositioning. Source code is available from http://csblcanges.fimm.fi/GOPredict/.
  • Aula, Hanna; Skyttä, Tanja; Tuohinen, Suvi; Luukkaala, Tiina; Hämäläinen, Mari; Virtanen, Vesa; Raatikainen, Pekka; Moilanen, Eeva; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa (2018)
    BackgroundRadiation-induced heart disease is mainly caused by activation of the fibrotic process. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-1) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are pro-fibrotic mediators. The aim of our study was to evaluate the behavior of TGF-1 and PDGF during adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer and the association of these cytokines with echocardiographic changes.MethodsOur study included 73 women with early-stage breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) receiving post-operative RT but not chemotherapy. TGF-1 and PDGF levels in serum samples taken before and on the last day of RT were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Echocardiography was also performed at same time points. Patients were grouped according to a15% worsening in tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) and pericardium calibrated integrated backscatter (cIBS).ResultsIn all patients, the median TGF-1 decreased from 25.0 (IQR 21.1-30.3) ng/ml to 23.6 (IQR 19.6-26.8) ng/ml (p=0.003), and the median PDGF decreased from 18.0 (IQR 13.7-22.7) ng/ml to 15.6 (IQR 12.7-19.5) ng/ml (p
  • Sipila, Reetta M.; Haasio, Lassi; Meretoja, Tuomo J.; Ripatti, Samuli; Estlander, Ann-Mari; Kalso, Eija A. (2017)
    The aim of this study was to identify clinical risk factors for unfavorable pain trajectories after breast cancer surgery, to better understand the association between pain expectation, psychological distress, and acute postoperative pain. This prospective study included 563 women treated for breast cancer. Psychological data included questionnaires for depressive symptoms and anxiety. Experimental pain tests for heat and cold were performed before surgery. The amount of oxycodone needed for satisfactory pain relief after surgery was recorded. Pain intensity in the area of operation before surgery and during the first postoperative week and expected intensity of postoperative pain were recorded using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS 0-10). Pain trajectories were formed to describe both initial intensity (the intercept) and the direction of the pain path (the slope). Factors associated with higher initial pain intensity (the intercept) were the amount of oxycodone needed for adequate analgesia, psychological distress, type of axillary surgery, preoperative pain in the area of the operation, and expectation of postoperative pain. The higher the pain initially was, the faster it resolved over the week. Expectation of severe postoperative pain was associated with higher scores of both experimental and clinical pain intensity and psychological factors. The results confirm that acute pain after breast cancer surgery is a multidimensional phenomenon. Psychological distress, pain expectation, and the patients' report of preoperative pain in the area to be operated should be recognized before surgery. Patients having axillary clearance need more efficient analgesic approaches.
  • Pollari, Sirkku; Kakonen, Sanna-Maria; Edgren, Henrik; Wolf, Maija; Kohonen, Pekka; Sara, Henri; Guise, Theresa; Nees, Matthias; Kallioniemi, Olli (2011)
    Since bone metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease, causing significant morbidity and mortality, an understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms would be highly valuable. Here, we describe in vitro and in vivo evidences for the importance of serine biosynthesis in the metastasis of breast cancer to bone. We first characterized the bone metastatic propensity of the MDA-MB-231(SA) cell line variant as compared to the parental MDA-MB-231 cells by radiographic and histological observations in the inoculated mice. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of this isogenic cell line pair revealed that all the three genes involved in the L-serine biosynthesis pathway, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase 1 (PSAT1), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSPH) were upregulated in the highly metastatic variant. This pathway is the primary endogenous source for L-serine in mammalian tissues. Consistently, we observed that the proliferation of MDAMB- 231(SA) cells in serine-free conditions was dependent on PSAT1 expression. In addition, we observed that L-serine is essential for the formation of bone resorbing human osteoclasts and may thus contribute to the vicious cycle of osteolytic bone metastasis. High expression of PHGDH and PSAT1 in primary breast cancer was significantly associated with decreased relapse-free and overall survival of patients and malignant phenotypic features of breast cancer. In conclusion, high expression of serine biosynthesis genes in metastatic breast cancer cells and the stimulating effect of L-serine on osteoclastogenesis and cancer cell proliferation indicate a functionally critical role for serine biosynthesis in bone metastatic breast cancer and thereby an opportunity for targeted therapeutic interventions.
  • Kjällquist, Una; Erlandsson, Rikard; Tobin, Nicholas P; Alkodsi, Amjad; Ullah, Ikram; Stålhammar, Gustav; Karlsson, Eva; Hatschek, Thomas; Hartman, Johan; Linnarsson, Sten; Bergh, Jonas (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer tumors is today widely recognized. Most of the available knowledge in genetic variation however, relates to the primary tumor while metastatic lesions are much less studied. Many studies have revealed marked alterations of standard prognostic and predictive factors during tumor progression. Characterization of paired primary- and metastatic tissues should therefore be fundamental in order to understand mechanisms of tumor progression, clonal relationship to tumor evolution as well as the therapeutic aspects of systemic disease. Methods We performed full exome sequencing of primary breast cancers and their metastases in a cohort of ten patients and further confirmed our findings in an additional cohort of 20 patients with paired primary and metastatic tumors. Furthermore, we used gene expression from the metastatic lesions and a primary breast cancer data set to study the gene expression of the AKAP gene family. Results We report that somatic mutations in A-kinase anchoring proteins are enriched in metastatic lesions. The frequency of mutation in the AKAP gene family was 10% in the primary tumors and 40% in metastatic lesions. Several copy number variations, including deletions in regions containing AKAP genes were detected and showed consistent patterns in both investigated cohorts. In a second cohort containing 20 patients with paired primary and metastatic lesions, AKAP mutations showed an increasing variant allele frequency after multiple relapses. Furthermore, gene expression profiles from the metastatic lesions (n = 120) revealed differential expression patterns of AKAPs relative to the tumor PAM50 intrinsic subtype, which were most apparent in the basal-like subtype. This pattern was confirmed in primary tumors from TCGA (n = 522) and in a third independent cohort (n = 182). Conclusion Several studies from primary cancers have reported individual AKAP genes to be associated with cancer risk and metastatic relapses as well as direct involvement in cellular invasion and migration processes. Our findings reveal an enrichment of mutations in AKAP genes in metastatic breast cancers and suggest the involvement of AKAPs in the metastatic process. In addition, we report an AKAP gene expression pattern that consistently follows the tumor intrinsic subtype, further suggesting AKAP family members as relevant players in breast cancer biology.
  • Kjällquist, Una; Erlandsson, Rikard; Tobin, Nicholas P.; Alkodsi, Amjad; Ullah, Ikram; Stalhammar, Gustav; Karlsson, Eva; Hatschek, Thomas; Hartman, Johan; Linnarsson, Sten; Bergh, Jonas (2018)
    Background: Tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer tumors is today widely recognized. Most of the available knowledge in genetic variation however, relates to the primary tumor while metastatic lesions are much less studied. Many studies have revealed marked alterations of standard prognostic and predictive factors during tumor progression. Characterization of paired primary- and metastatic tissues should therefore be fundamental in order to understand mechanisms of tumor progression, clonal relationship to tumor evolution as well as the therapeutic aspects of systemic disease. Methods: We performed full exome sequencing of primary breast cancers and their metastases in a cohort of ten patients and further confirmed our findings in an additional cohort of 20 patients with paired primary and metastatic tumors. Furthermore, we used gene expression from the metastatic lesions and a primary breast cancer data set to study the gene expression of the AKAP gene family. Results: We report that somatic mutations in A-kinase anchoring proteins are enriched in metastatic lesions. The frequency of mutation in the AKAP gene family was 10% in the primary tumors and 40% in metastatic lesions. Several copy number variations, including deletions in regions containing AKAP genes were detected and showed consistent patterns in both investigated cohorts. In a second cohort containing 20 patients with paired primary and metastatic lesions, AKAP mutations showed an increasing variant allele frequency after multiple relapses. Furthermore, gene expression profiles from the metastatic lesions (n = 120) revealed differential expression patterns of AKAPs relative to the tumor PAM50 intrinsic subtype, which were most apparent in the basal-like subtype. This pattern was confirmed in primary tumors from TCGA (n = 522) and in a third independent cohort (n = 182). Conclusion: Several studies from primary cancers have reported individual AKAP genes to be associated with cancer risk and metastatic relapses as well as direct involvement in cellular invasion and migration processes. Our findings reveal an enrichment of mutations in AKAP genes in metastatic breast cancers and suggest the involvement of AKAPs in the metastatic process. In addition, we report an AKAP gene expression pattern that consistently follows the tumor intrinsic subtype, further suggesting AKAP family members as relevant players in breast cancer biology.
  • Fagerholm, Rainer; Faltinova, Maria; Aaltonen, Kirsi; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Heikkila, Paivi; Halttunen-Nieminen, Mervi; Nevanlinna, Heli; Blomqvist, Carl (2018)
    Long term use of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) has been reported to increase breast cancer risk. On the other hand, observational studies suggest that breast cancers diagnosed during HT may have a more favorable prognosis. While family history is a risk factor for breast cancer, and genetic factors also influence prognosis, the role of family history in combination with HT use has been little studied. We investigated the relationship between HT, family history, and prognosis in 584 (267 exposed) familial and 952 (460 exposed) non-familial breast cancer cases, using three survival end points: death from breast cancer (BCS), distant disease free survival (DDFS), and local recurrence free survival (LRFS). Among non-familial cases, HT was associated with better BCS (HR 0.63, 95% CI 0.41-0.94; p = 0.025), and DDFS (HR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40-0.85; p = 0.005), with a consistent but not statistically significant effect in LRFS. This effect was not seen in familial cases (HR > 1.0), and family history was found to interact with HT in BCS (p((interaction)) = 0.0067) (BC-death) and DDFS (p((interaction)) = 0.0070). There was phenotypic heterogeneity between HT-associated tumors in familial and non-familial cases, particularly on estrogen receptor (ER) status, although the interaction between HT and family history appears to be at least partially independent of these markers (p = 0.0370 after adjustment for standard prognostic factors). If confirmed by further studies, our results suggest that family history should be taken into consideration in clinical counseling before beginning a HT regimen.