Browsing by Subject "Burn injury"

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  • Rakkolainen, I.; Lindbohm, J. V.; Vuola, J. (2018)
    BackgroundAcute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in severe burns and can lead to significantly poorer outcomes. Although the prognosis has improved in recent decades, the mortality of AKI remains considerable. We investigated the factors that increase the risk of AKI and death after severe burn injury.MethodsIntensive care patients with 20% burned total body surface area (TBSA%) between January 2006 and December 2015 treated in Helsinki Burn Centre were enrolled retrospectively. Patients who arrived >36h after burn injury or died 80. Multivariate logistic regression model detected age, TBSA%, sepsis, and rhabdomyolysis as independent risk factors for AKI. Age (per 10yrs. OR 1.99), TBSA% (per 10% OR 1.64), and AKI predicted mortality during hospital stay; AKI had an odds ratio of (OR) of 5.97 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2-16.2).ConclusionsAge, TBSA%, and AKI were the strongest independent factors in predicting outcome in severe burns. Even a major burn (>50% TBSA) has a relatively good prognosis without simultaneous AKI. Prognosis is poorer even in minor burns for patients with AKI.
  • Rakkolainen, I.; Lindbohm, J. V; Vuola, J. (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in severe burns and can lead to significantly poorer outcomes. Although the prognosis has improved in recent decades, the mortality of AKI remains considerable. We investigated the factors that increase the risk of AKI and death after severe burn injury. Methods Intensive care patients with ≥20% burned total body surface area (TBSA%) between January 2006 and December 2015 treated in Helsinki Burn Centre were enrolled retrospectively. Patients who arrived > 36 h after burn injury or died < 48 h from arrival were excluded. A total of 187 patients were included in the final analysis. Serum creatinine ≥120 μmol/l (1.4 mg/dl) was the criterion for AKI. Results Fifty-one patients (27.3%) developed AKI during hospital stay and 21 (11.2%) required renal replacement therapy (RRT); 37 patients (19.8%) died during hospital stay. Mortality was significantly higher in the AKI group (52.9%) than in the AKI-negative group (7.4%). The Abbreviated Burn Severity Index (ABSI), Baux, and the modified Baux score were nearly equivalent in predicting mortality during ICU stay (AUC: 0.83–0.84). The risk of death and AKI were minimal with Baux scores < 80. LD50 was 112 for Baux score in all patients. In flame burns, the risk of death increased rapidly after Baux score > 80. Multivariate logistic regression model detected age, TBSA%, sepsis, and rhabdomyolysis as independent risk factors for AKI. Age (per 10 yrs. OR 1.99), TBSA% (per 10% OR 1.64), and AKI predicted mortality during hospital stay; AKI had an odds ratio of (OR) of 5.97 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2–16.2). Conclusions Age, TBSA%, and AKI were the strongest independent factors in predicting outcome in severe burns. Even a major burn (> 50% TBSA) has a relatively good prognosis without simultaneous AKI. Prognosis is poorer even in minor burns for patients with AKI.
  • Tanttula, Kimmo; Haikonen, Kari; Vuola, Jyrki (2018)
    To analyse the epidemiology of burns in Finland, a comprehensive study was conducted among all hospitalized burn patients between 1980 and 2010. All patients with burn injury as the main diagnosis, 36305 cases in total, treated in the public and private sectors, were included. Patient data were obtained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register (FHDR). The incidence of hospitalized injuries declined from over 30 to 17 per 100000 persons. Men were at higher risk than women in all age groups. Children aged under ten years were overrepresented throughout the period and the highest incidence was found among one year old boys. The median total length of stay shortened from seven days in 1980-1995 to five days in 1996-2010. The annual number of hospitalized patients is recently under 1000 cases (17/100000). The male predominance (70%) did not change but the age group with the most injuries shifted from 20-39 years to 40-59 years. Injuries were most common during the summer months. This study of all hospitalized burn injuries of one entire country shows similar tendency of diminishing numbers and rising age of burn victims as in other western countries. The FHDR is a reliable source of data in epidemiological studies but precise recording of E- and N-codes in the registry would enable the accurate analysis of types and extent of injury. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.