Browsing by Subject "CANCER CELLS"

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  • Acheva, Anna; Kärki, Tytti; Schaible, Niccole; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Tojkander, Sari (2021)
    In postmenopausal women, a major risk factor for the development of breast cancer is obesity. In particular, the adipose tissue-derived adipokine leptin has been strongly linked to tumor cell proliferation, migration, and metastasis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that treatment of normal mammary epithelial cells with leptin induces EMT-like features characterized by higher cellular migration speeds, loss of structural ordering of 3D-mammo spheres, and enhancement of epithelial traction forces. Mechanistically, leptin triggers the phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase-2 (MLC-2) through the interdependent activity of leptin receptor and Ca2+ channels. These data provide evidence that leptin-activated leptin receptors, in co-operation with mechanosensitive Ca2+ channels, play a role in the development of breast carcinomas through the regulation of actomyosin dynamics.
  • Talman, Virpi; Tuominen, Raimo K.; Boije af Gennäs, Gustav; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Ekokoski, Elina (2011)
  • Tobiasson, Magnus; Abdulkadir, Hani; Lennartsson, Andreas; Katayama, Shintaro; Marabita, Francesco; De Paepe, Ayla; Karimi, Mohsen; Krjutskov, Kaarel; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Grovdal, Michael; Jansson, Monika; Ben Azenkoud, Asmaa; Corddedu, Lina; Lehmann, Soren; Ekwall, Karl; Kere, Juha; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Ungerstedt, Johanna (2017)
    Azacitidine (Aza) is first-line treatment for patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), although its precise mechanism of action is unknown. We performed the first study to globally evaluate the epigenetic effects of Aza on MDS bone marrow progenitor cells assessing gene expression (RNA seq), DNA methylation (Illumina 450k) and the histone modifications H3K18ac and H3K9me3 (ChIP seq). Aza induced a general increase in gene expression with 924 significantly upregulated genes but this increase showed no correlation with changes in DNA methylation or H3K18ac, and only a weak association with changes in H3K9me3. Interestingly, we observed activation of transcripts containing 15 endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) confirming previous cell line studies. DNA methylation decreased moderately in 99% of all genes, with a median beta-value reduction of 0.018; the most pronounced effects seen in heterochromatin. Aza-induced hypomethylation correlated significantly with change in H3K9me3. The pattern of H3K18ac and H3K9me3 displayed large differences between patients and healthy controls without any consistent pattern induced by Aza. We conclude that the marked induction of gene expression only partly could be explained by epigenetic changes, and propose that activation of ERVs may contribute to the clinical effects of Aza in MDS.
  • Saari, H.; Lisitsyna, Ekaterina S.; Rautaniemi, K.; Rojalin, T.; Niemi, L.; Nivaro, O.; Laaksonen, T.; Yliperttula, M.; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, E. (2018)
    In response to physiological and artificial stimuli, cells generate nano-scale extracellular vesicles (EVs) by encapsulating biomolecules in plasma membrane-derived phospholipid envelopes. These vesicles are released to bodily fluids, hence acting as powerful endogenous mediators in intercellular signaling. EVs provide a compelling alternative for biomarker discovery and targeted drug delivery, but their kinetics and dynamics while interacting with living cells are poorly understood. Here we introduce a novel method, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to investigate these interaction attributes. By FLIM, we show distinct cellular uptake mechanisms of different EV subtypes, exosomes and microvesicles, loaded with anti-cancer agent, paclitaxel. We demonstrate differences in intracellular behavior and drug release profiles of paclitaxel-containing EVs. Exosomes seem to deliver the drug mostly by endocytosis while microvesicles enter the cells by both endocytosis and fusion with cell membrane. This research offers a new real-time method to investigate EV kinetics with living cells, and it is a potential advancement to complement the existing techniques. The findings of this study improve the current knowledge in exploiting EVs as next-generation targeted drug delivery systems.
  • Nair, Vidhya A.; Valo, Satu; Peltomäki, Päivi; Bajbouj, Khuloud; Abdel-Rahman, Wael M. (2020)
    There is an ample epidemiological evidence to support the role of environmental contaminants such as bisphenol A (BPA) in breast cancer development but the molecular mechanisms of their action are still not fully understood. Therefore, we sought to analyze the effects of three common contaminants (BPA; 4-tert-octylphenol, OP; hexabromocyclododecane, HBCD) on mammary epithelial cell (HME1) and MCF7 breast cancer cell line. We also supplied some data on methoxychlor, MXC; 4-nonylphenol, NP; and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4-b] pyridine, PhIP. We focused on testing the prolonged (two months) exposure to low nano-molar concentrations (0.0015-0.0048 nM) presumed to be oncogenic and found that they induced DNA damage (evidenced by upregulation of pH2A.X, pCHK1, pCHK2, p-P53) and disrupted the cell cycle. Some agents induced epigenetic (methylation) changes of tumor suppressor genes TIMP3, CHFR, ESR1, IGSF4, CDH13, and GSTP1. Obviously, the accumulation of these molecular alterations is an essential base for cancer development. Consistent with this, we observed that these agents increased cellular invasiveness through collagen. Cellular abilities to form colonies in soft agar were increased for MCF7. Toxic agents induced phosphorylation of protein kinase such as EGFR, CREB, STAT6, c-Jun, STAT3, HSP6, HSP27, AMPK alpha 1, FAK, p53, GSK-3 alpha/beta, and P70S6 in HME1. Most of these proteins are involved in potential oncogenic pathways. Overall, these data clarify the molecular alterations that can be induced by some common environmental contaminants in mammary epithelial cells which could be a foundation to understand environmental carcinogenesis.
  • Harmati, Maria; Gyukity-Sebestyen, Edina; Dobra, Gabriella; Janovak, Laszlo; Dekany, Imre; Saydam, Okay; Hunyadi-Gulyas, Eva; Nagy, Istvan; Farkas, Attila; Pankotai, Tibor; Ujfaludi, Zsuzsanna; Horvath, Peter; Piccinini, Filippo; Kovacs, Maria; Biro, Tamas; Buzas, Krisztina (2019)
    Exosomes are small extracellular vesicles (sEVs), playing a crucial role in the intercellular communication in physiological as well as pathological processes. Here, we aimed to study whether the melanoma-derived sEV-mediated communication could adapt to microenvironmental stresses. We compared B16F1 cell-derived sEVs released under normal and stress conditions, including cytostatic, heat and oxidative stress. The miRNome and proteome showed substantial differences across the sEV groups and bioinformatics analysis of the obtained data by the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis also revealed significant functional differences. The in silico predicted functional alterations of sEVs were validated by in vitro assays. For instance, melanoma-derived sEVs elicited by oxidative stress increased Ki-67 expression of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); cytostatic stress-resulted sEVs facilitated melanoma cell migration; all sEV groups supported microtissue generation of MSC-B16F1 co-cultures in a 3D tumour matrix model. Based on this study, we concluded that (i) molecular patterns of tumour-derived sEVs, dictated by the microenvironmental conditions, resulted in specific response patterns in the recipient cells; (ii) in silico analyses could be useful tools to predict different stress responses; (iii) alteration of the sEV-mediated communication of tumour cells might be a therapy-induced host response, with a potential influence on treatment efficacy.
  • Quintero, Ileana B.; Herrala, Annakaisa M.; Araujo, Cesar L.; Pulkka, Anitta E.; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Ovaska, Kristian; Pryazhnikov, Evgeny; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Ruuth, Maija K.; Soini, Ylermi; Sormunen, Raija T.; Khirug, Leonard; Vihko, Pirkko T. (2013)
  • Salmiheimo, Aino; Mustonen, Harri; Vainionpaa, Sanna; Shen, Zhanlong; Kemppainen, Esko; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Seppanen, Hanna (2017)
    Objectives: Tumour-associated macrophages participate in tumour development and progression. The aim of this study was to assess the interactions of pancreatic cancer cells and pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, specifically their effect on pancreatic cancer cell migration and the changes in STAT-signalling. Methods: Monocytes were isolated from healthy subjects and differentiated into macrophages with M-CSF. The macrophages were polarized towards M1 by IL-12 and towards M2 by IL-10. We studied also the effect of pan-JAK/STAT-inhibitor P6. Macrophage polarization and STAT and NF kappa B-activation in both MiaPaCa-2 and macrophages were assessed by flow cytometry. We recorded the effect of co-culture on migration rate of pancreatic cancer cells MiaPaCa-2. Results: Macrophages increased the migration rate of pancreatic cancer cells. Co-culture activated STAT1, STAT3, STAT5, AKT and NF kappa B in macrophages and STAT3 in MiaPaCa-2 cells. IL-12 polarized macrophages towards M1 and decreased the migration rate of pancreatic cancer cells in co-cultures as well as P6. IL-10 skewed macrophage polarization towards M2 and induced increase of pancreatic cancer cells in co-cultures. Conclusion: Co-culture with macrophages increased pancreatic cancer cell migration and activated STAT3. It is possible to activate and deactivate migration of pancreatic cancer cells trough macrophage polarization. (C) 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.