Browsing by Subject "CANCER"

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  • Buettner, Ralf; Le Xuan Truong Nguyen,; Kumar, Bijender; Morales, Corey; Liu, Chao; Chen, Lisa S.; Pemovska, Tea; Synold, Timothy W.; Palmer, Joycelynne; Thompson, Ryan; Li, Ling; Dinh Hoa Hoang,; Zhang, Bin; Ghoda, Lucy; Kowolik, Claudia; Kontro, Mika; Leitch, Calum; Wennerberg, Krister; Yu, Xiaochun; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Horne, David; Gandhi, Varsha; Pullarkat, Vinod; Marcucci, Guido; Rosen, Steven T. (2019)
    Nucleoside analogs represent the backbone of several distinct chemotherapy regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has improved survival of AML patients, including those harboring the poor-risk FLT3-ITD mutation. Although these compounds are effective in killing proliferating blasts, they lack activity against quiescent leukemia stem cells (LSCs), which contributes to initial treatment refractoriness or subsequent disease relapse. The reagent 8-chloro-adenosine (8-Cl-Ado) is a ribose-containing, RNA-directed nucleoside analog that is incorporated into newly transcribed RNA rather than in DNA, causing inhibition of RNA transcription. In this report, we demonstrate antileukemic activities of 8-Cl-Ado in vitro and in vivo and provide mechanistic insight into the mode of action of 8-Cl-Ado in AML. 8-Cl-Ado markedly induced apoptosis in LSC, with negligible effects on normal stem cells. 8-Cl-Ado was particularly effective against AML cell lines and primary AML blast cells harboring the FLT3-ITD mutation. FLT3-ITD is associated with high expression of miR-155. Furthermore, we demonstrate that 8-Cl-Ado inhibits miR-155 expression levels accompanied by induction of DNA-damage and suppression of cell proliferation, through regulation of miR-155/ErbB3 binding protein 1(Ebp1)/p53/PCNA signaling. Finally, we determined that combined treatment of NSG mice engrafted with FLT3-ITD (+) MV4-11 AML cells with 8-Cl-Ado and the FLT3 inhibitor AC220 (quizartinib) synergistically enhanced survival, compared with that of mice treated with the individual drugs, suggesting a potentially effective approach for FLT3-ITD AML patients.
  • Tammiste, Triin; Kask, Keiu; Padrik, Peeter; Idla, Kulli; Rosenstein, Karin; Jatsenko, Tatjana; Veerus, Piret; Salumets, Andres (2019)
    BackgroundOvarian insufficiency is a major concern for long-term cancer survivors. Although semen freezing is well established to preserve male fertility, the possibilities to secure post-cancer female fertility are mostly limited to oocyte or embryo freezing. These methods require time-consuming ovarian stimulation with or without in vitro fertilization (IVF) that evidently delays cancer therapy. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation and subsequent thawed tissue autotransplantation are considered the most promising alternative strategy for restoring the fertility of oncology patients, which has not yet received the full clinical acceptance. Therefore, all successful cases are needed to prove its reliability and safety.Case presentationHere we report a single case in Estonia, where a 28-year-old woman with malignant breast neoplasm had ovarian cortex cryopreserved before commencing gonadotoxic chemo- and radiotherapy. Two years after cancer therapy, the patient underwent heterotopic ovarian tissue transplantation into the lateral pelvic wall. The folliculogenesis was stimulated in the transplanted tissue by exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone and oocytes were collected under ultrasound guidance for IVF and embryo transfer. The healthy boy was born after full-term gestation in 2014, first in Eastern Europe.ConclusionDespite many countries have reported the first implementation of the ovarian tissue freezing and transplantation protocols, the data is still limited on the effectiveness of heterotopic ovarian transplant techniques. Thus, all case reports of heterotopic ovarian tissue transplantation and long-term follow-ups to describe the children's health are valuable source of clinical experience.
  • Thorgeirsson, T. E.; Gudbjartsson, D. F.; Sulem, P.; Besenbacher, S.; Styrkarsdottir, U.; Thorleifsson, G.; Walters, G. B.; Furberg, H.; Sullivan, P. F.; Marchini, J.; McCarthy, M. I.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.; TAG Consortium; Oxford-GSK Consortium; ENGAGE Consortium; Kaprio, Jaakko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Shen, Huei-Yi (2013)
  • DREAM SMC-Het Participants; Salcedo, Adriana; Mustonen, Ville (2020)
    Methods for reconstructing tumor evolution are benchmarked in the DREAM Somatic Mutation Calling Tumour Heterogeneity Challenge. Tumor DNA sequencing data can be interpreted by computational methods that analyze genomic heterogeneity to infer evolutionary dynamics. A growing number of studies have used these approaches to link cancer evolution with clinical progression and response to therapy. Although the inference of tumor phylogenies is rapidly becoming standard practice in cancer genome analyses, standards for evaluating them are lacking. To address this need, we systematically assess methods for reconstructing tumor subclonality. First, we elucidate the main algorithmic problems in subclonal reconstruction and develop quantitative metrics for evaluating them. Then we simulate realistic tumor genomes that harbor all known clonal and subclonal mutation types and processes. Finally, we benchmark 580 tumor reconstructions, varying tumor read depth, tumor type and somatic variant detection. Our analysis provides a baseline for the establishment of gold-standard methods to analyze tumor heterogeneity.
  • Okutachi, Sunday; Manoharan, Ganesh Babu; Kiriazis, Alexandros; Laurini, Christina; Catillon, Marie; McCormick, Frank; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Abankwa, Daniel (2021)
    Recently, the highly mutated oncoprotein K-Ras4B (hereafter K-Ras) was shown to drive cancer cell stemness in conjunction with calmodulin (CaM). We previously showed that the covalent CaM inhibitor ophiobolin A (OphA) can potently inhibit K-Ras stemness activity. However, OphA, a fungus-derived natural product, exhibits an unspecific, broad toxicity across all phyla. Here we identified a less toxic, functional analog of OphA that can efficiently inactivate CaM by covalent inhibition. We analyzed a small series of benzazulenones, which bear some structural similarity to OphA and can be synthesized in only six steps. We identified the formyl aminobenzazulenone 1, here named Calmirasone1, as a novel and potent covalent CaM inhibitor. Calmirasone1 has a 4-fold increased affinity for CaM as compared to OphA and was active against K-Ras in cells within minutes, as compared to hours required by OphA. Calmirasone1 displayed a 2.5-4.5-fold higher selectivity for KRAS over BRAF mutant 3D spheroid growth than OphA, suggesting improved relative on-target activity. Importantly, Calmirasone1 has a 40-260-fold lower unspecific toxic effect on HRAS mutant cells, while it reaches almost 50% of the activity of novel K-RasG12C specific inhibitors in 3D spheroid assays. Our results suggest that Calmirasone1 can serve as a new tool compound to further investigate the cancer cell biology of the K-Ras and CaM associated stemness activities.
  • Vaarno, Jenni; Myller, Jyri; Bachour, Adel; Koskinen, Heli; Bäck, Leif; Klockars, Tuomas; Koskinen, Anni (2020)
    Purpose We have previously demonstrated that dogs can be trained to distinguish the urine of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from that of healthy controls based on olfaction. Encouraged by these promising results, we wanted to investigate if a detection dog could work as a screening tool for OSA. The objective of this study was to prospectively assess the dogs' ability to identify sleep apnea in patients with OSA suspicion. Methods Urine samples were collected from 50 patients suspected of having OSA. The urine sample was classified as positive for OSA when the patient had a respiratory event index of 5/h or more. The accuracy of two trained dogs in identifying OSA was tested in a prospective blinded setting. Results Both of the dogs correctly detected approximately half of the positive and negative samples. There were no statistically significant differences in the dogs' ability to recognize more severe cases of OSA, as compared to milder cases. Conclusion According to our study, dogs cannot be used to screen for OSA in clinical settings, most likely due to the heterogenic nature of OSA.
  • Chan, Keefe T.; Blake, Shaun; Zhu, Haoran; Kang, Jian; Trigos, Anna S.; Madhamshettiwar, Piyush B.; Diesch, Jeannine; Paavolainen, Lassi; Horvath, Peter; Hannan, Ross D.; George, Amee J.; Sanij, Elaine; Hannan, Katherine M.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Pearson, Richard B. (2020)
    Exquisite regulation of PI3K/AKT/mTORC1 signaling is essential for homeostatic control of cell growth, proliferation, and survival. Aberrant activation of this signaling network is an early driver of many sporadic human cancers. Paradoxically, sustained hyperactivation of the PI3K/AKT/mTORC1 pathway in nontransformed cells results in cellular senescence, which is a tumor-suppressive mechanism that must be overcome to promote malignant transformation. While oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) driven by excessive RAS/ERK signaling has been well studied, little is known about the mechanisms underpinning the AKT-induced senescence (AIS) response. Here, we utilize a combination of transcriptome and metabolic profiling to identify key signatures required to maintain AIS. We also employ a whole protein-coding genome RNAi screen for AIS escape, validating a subset of novel mediators and demonstrating their preferential specificity for AIS as compared with OIS. As proof of concept of the potential to exploit the AIS network, we show that neurofibromin 1 (NF1) is upregulated during AIS and its ability to suppress RAS/ERK signaling facilitates AIS maintenance. Furthermore, depletion of NF1 enhances transformation of p53-mutant epithelial cells expressing activated AKT, while its overexpression blocks transformation by inducing a senescent-like phenotype. Together, our findings reveal novel mechanistic insights into the control of AIS and identify putative senescence regulators that can potentially be targeted, with implications for new therapeutic options to treat PI3K/AKT/mTORC1-driven cancers.
  • Ryhänen, Eeva; Leijon, Helena; Metso, Saara; Eloranta, Eija; Korsoff, Pirkko; Ahtiainen, Petteri; Kekäläinen, Päivi; Tamminen, Marjo; Ristamaki, Raija; Knutar, Otto; Loyttyniemi, Eliisa; Niskanen, Leo; Väisänen, Mika; Heiskanen, Ilkka Sten; Välimäki, Matti; Laakso, Markku; Haglund, Caj; Arola, Johanna; Schalin-Jantti, Camilla (2017)
    Background: Parathyroid carcinoma (PC) is rare and diagnostically challenging. Reported outcomes are rather poor and the incidence might be increasing.Material and methods: We performed a nationwide study on all cases (n=32) diagnosed in 2000-2011 in Finland, and compared clinical and histopathological characteristics and outcome to atypical parathyroid (APA; n=28) and parathyroid adenomas (PA; n=72). The incidence in years 1955-1999 was compared to that in 2000-2013.Results: Preoperatively, calcium and parathyroid hormone concentrations were higher in PC compared to APA and PA (1.76, 1.56 and 1.44mmol/l, p
  • Wicker, Nicolas; Carles, Annaïck; Mills, Ian; Wolf, Maija; Veerakumarasivam, Abhi; Edgren, Henrik; Boileau, Fabrice; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Schalken, Jack; Neal, David; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Poch, Olivier (2007)
  • Farnebo, Lovisa; Laurell, Goran; Makitie, Antti (2016)
    Conclusion: The management of Head and Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary (HNCUP) patients varies both between centres within and also between the Nordic countries. This study contributes to a continuing discussion of how to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and quality of treatment of HNCUP patients.Objectives: The initiative for this study was based on the lack of common guidelines for diagnostic procedures and for treatment of HNCUP patients in the Nordic countries constituting a region having a rather homogeneous population.Method: A structured questionnaire was sent to all university hospitals in the five Nordic countries.Results: Four of the five Nordic countries use either national guidelines or specific protocols when handling HNCUP. The main diagnostic tools are PET-CT, fine needle aspiration, endoscopic evaluation with biopsies, and most often bilateral tonsillectomy. At 21 of 22 university hospitals the treatment decision is made at a multidisciplinary conference. Three of seven Swedish centres use only radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy to treat N+ HNCUP patients. Robotic surgery for biopsy of the tongue base is beginning to become an alternative to targeted biopsies in Sweden and Finland. Narrow Band Imaging is used only in Finland.
  • Gupta, Abhishekh; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero (2020)
    Accurate quantification of drug effects is crucial for identifying pharmaceutically actionable cancer vulnerabilities. Current cell viability-based measurements often lead to biased response estimates due to varying growth rates and experimental artifacts that explain part of the inconsistency in high-throughput screening results. We developed an improved drug scoring model, normalized drug response (NDR), which makes use of both positive and negative control conditions to account for differences in cell growth rates, and experimental noise to better characterize drug-induced effects. We demonstrate an improved consistency and accuracy of NDR compared to existing metrics in assessing drug responses of cancer cells in various culture models and experimental setups. Notably, NDR reliably captures both toxicity and viability responses, and differentiates a wider spectrum of drug behavior, including lethal, growth-inhibitory and growth-stimulatory modes, based on a single viability readout. The method will therefore substantially reduce the time and resources required in cell-based drug sensitivity screening. Abhishekh Gupta et al. present a normalized drug response (NDR) metric for accurate quantification of drug sensitivity in cell-based high-throughput assays. They show that NDR captures both toxicity and viability responses to improve drug effect classification over existing methods.
  • Schnitzbauer, Andreas A.; Zuelke, Carl; Graeb, Christian; Rochon, Justine; Bilbao, Itxarone; Burra, Patrizia; de Jong, Koert P.; Duvoux, Christophe; Kneteman, Norman M.; Adam, Rene; Bechstein, Wolf O.; Becker, Thomas; Beckebaum, Susanne; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Cillo, Umberto; Colledan, Michele; Faendrich, Fred; Gugenheim, Jean; Hauss, Johann P.; Heise, Michael; Hidalgo, Ernest; Jamieson, Neville; Koenigsrainer, Alfred; Lamby, Philipp E.; Lerut, Jan P.; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Margreiter, Raimund; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Mutzbauer, Ingrid; Otto, Gerd; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Pinna, Antonio D.; Pirenne, Jacques; Rizell, Magnus; Rossi, Giorgio; Rostaing, Lionel; Roy, Andre; Sanchez Turrion, Victor; Schmidt, Jan; Troisi, Roberto I.; van Hoek, Bart; Valente, Umberto; Wolf, Philippe; Wolters, Heiner; Mirza, Darius F.; Scholz, Tim; Steininger, Rudolf; Soderdahl, Gunnar; Strasser, Simone I.; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Neuhaus, Peter; Schlitt, Hans J.; Geissler, Edward K. (2010)
  • Van Horebeek, Lies; Hilven, Kelly; Mallants, Klara; Van Nieuwenhuijze, Annemarie; Kelkka, Tiina; Savola, Paula; Mustjoki, Satu; Schlenner, Susan M.; Liston, Adrian; Dubois, Benedicte; Goris, An (2019)
    The role of somatic variants in diseases beyond cancer is increasingly being recognized, with potential roles in autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, as mutation rates and allele fractions are lower, studies in these diseases are substantially less tolerant of false positives, and bio-informatics algorithms require high replication rates. We developed a pipeline combining two variant callers, MuTect2 and VarScan2, with technical filtering and prioritization. Our pipeline detects somatic variants with allele fractions as low as 0.5% and achieves a replication rate of > 55%. Validation in an independent data set demonstrates excellent performance (sensitivity > 57%, specificity > 98%, replication rate > 80%). We applied this pipeline to the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis (MS) as a proof-of-principle. We demonstrate that 60% of MS patients carry 2-10 exonic somatic variants in their peripheral blood T and B cells, with the vast majority (80%) occurring in T cells and variants persisting over time. Synonymous variants significantly co-occur with non-synonymous variants. Systematic characterization indicates somatic variants are enriched for being novel or very rare in public databases of germline variants and trend towards being more damaging and conserved, as reflected by higher phred-scaled combined annotation-dependent depletion (CADD) and genomic evolutionary rate profiling (GERP) scores. Our pipeline and proof-of-principle now warrant further investigation of common somatic genetic variation on top of inherited genetic variation in the context of autoimmune disease, where it may offer subtle survival advantages to immune cells and contribute to the capacity of these cells to participate in the autoimmune reaction.
  • Mattila, Kalle E.; Laajala, Teemu D.; Tornberg, Sara V.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas P.; Vainio, Paula; Ettala, Otto; Bostrom, Peter J.; Nisen, Harry; Elo, Laura L.; Jaakkola, Panu M. (2021)
    After surgery of localized renal cell carcinoma, over 20% of the patients will develop distant metastases. Our aim was to develop an easy-to-use prognostic model for predicting metastasis-free survival after radical or partial nephrectomy of localized clear cell RCC. Model training was performed on 196 patients. Right-censored metastasis-free survival was analysed using LASSO-regularized Cox regression, which identified three key prediction features. The model was validated in an external cohort of 714 patients. 55 (28%) and 134 (19%) patients developed distant metastases during the median postoperative follow-up of 6.3 years (interquartile range 3.4-8.6) and 5.4 years (4.0-7.6) in the training and validation cohort, respectively. Patients were stratified into clinically meaningful risk categories using only three features: tumor size, tumor grade and microvascular invasion, and a representative nomogram and a visual prediction surface were constructed using these features in Cox proportional hazards model. Concordance indices in the training and validation cohorts were 0.755 +/- 0.029 and 0.836 +/- 0.015 for our novel model, which were comparable to the C-indices of the original Leibovich prediction model (0.734 +/- 0.035 and 0.848 +/- 0.017, respectively). Thus, the presented model retains high accuracy while requiring only three features that are routinely collected and widely available.
  • Renkonen, Suvi; Linden, Riikka; Bäck, Leif; Silen, Robert; Mäenpää, Hanna; Tapiovaara, Laura; Aro, Katri (2017)
    Primary treatment of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with lateral lymph node metastasis is surgery, but the extent of lateral neck dissection remains undefined. Preoperative imaging is used to guide the extent of surgery, although its sensitivity and specificity for defining the number and level of affected lymph nodes on the lateral neck is relatively modest. Our aim was to assess the role of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in predicting the requisite levels of neck dissection in patients with regionally metastatic PTC, with a focus on Levels II and V. All patients with PTC and lateral neck metastasis who had undergone neck dissection at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland from 2013 to 2016 and had a preoperative MRI available were retrospectively reviewed. A head and neck radiologist re-evaluated all MRIs, and the imaging findings were compared with histopathology after neck dissection. In the cohort of 39 patients, preoperative MRI showed concordance with histopathology for Levels II and V as follows: sensitivity of 94 and 67%, specificity of 20 and 91%, positive predictive value of 56 and 75%, and negative predictive value of 75 and 87%, respectively. In PTC, MRI demonstrated fairly high specificity and negative predictive value for Level V metastasis, and future studies are needed to verify our results to omit prophylactic dissection of this level. Routine dissection of Level II in patients with regionally metastatic PTC needs to be considered, as MRI showed low specificity.
  • Molnar, Csaba; Jermyn, Ian H.; Kato, Zoltan; Rahkama, Vesa; Ostling, Paivi; Mikkonen, Piia; Pietiainen, Vilja; Horvath, Peter (2016)
    The identification of fluorescently stained cell nuclei is the basis of cell detection, segmentation, and feature extraction in high content microscopy experiments. The nuclear morphology of single cells is also one of the essential indicators of phenotypic variation. However, the cells used in experiments can lose their contact inhibition, and can therefore pile up on top of each other, making the detection of single cells extremely challenging using current segmentation methods. The model we present here can detect cell nuclei and their morphology even in high-confluency cell cultures with many overlapping cell nuclei. We combine the "gas of near circles" active contour model, which favors circular shapes but allows slight variations around them, with a new data model. This captures a common property of many microscopic imaging techniques: the intensities from superposed nuclei are additive, so that two overlapping nuclei, for example, have a total intensity that is approximately double the intensity of a single nucleus. We demonstrate the power of our method on microscopic images of cells, comparing the results with those obtained from a widely used approach, and with manual image segmentations by experts.
  • Azoulay, Elie; Pickkers, Peter; Soares, Marcio; Perner, Anders; Rello, Jordi; Bauer, Philippe R.; van de Louw, Andry; Hemelaar, Pleun; Lemiale, Virginie; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Loeches, Ignacio Martin; Meyhoff, Tine Sylvest; Salluh, Jorge; Schellongowski, Peter; Rusinova, Katerina; Terzi, Nicolas; Mehta, Sangeeta; Antonelli, Massimo; Kouatchet, Achille; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Valkonen, Miia; Landburg, Precious Pearl; Bruneel, Fabrice; Bukan, Ramin Brandt; Pene, Frederic; Metaxa, Victoria; Moreau, Anne Sophie; Souppart, Virginie; Burghi, Gaston; Girault, Christophe; Silva, Ulysses V. A.; Montini, Luca; Barbier, Francois; Nielsen, Lene B.; Gaborit, Benjamin; Mokart, Djamel; Chevret, Sylvie; Efraim Investigators; Nine-I Study Grp (2017)
    In immunocompromised patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (ARF), initial management aims primarily to avoid invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). To assess the impact of initial management on IMV and mortality rates, we performed a multinational observational prospective cohort study in 16 countries (68 centers). A total of 1611 patients were enrolled (hematological malignancies 51.9%, solid tumors 35.2%, systemic diseases 17.3%, and solid organ transplantation 8.8%). The main ARF etiologies were bacterial (29.5%), viral (15.4%), and fungal infections (14.7%), or undetermined (13.2%). On admission, 915 (56.8%) patients were not intubated. They received standard oxygen (N = 496, 53.9%), high-flow oxygen (HFNC, N = 187, 20.3%), noninvasive ventilation (NIV, N = 153, 17.2%), and NIV + HFNC (N = 79, 8.6%). Factors associated with IMV included age (hazard ratio = 0.92/year, 95% CI 0.86-0.99), day-1 SOFA (1.09/point, 1.06-1.13), day-1 PaO2/FiO(2) (1.47, 1.05-2.07), ARF etiology (Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (2.11, 1.42-3.14), invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (1.85, 1.21-2.85), and undetermined cause (1.46, 1.09-1.98). After propensity score matching, HFNC, but not NIV, had an effect on IMV rate (HR = 0.77, 95% CI 0.59-1.00, p = 0.05). ICU, hospital, and day-90 mortality rates were 32.4, 44.1, and 56.4%, respectively. Factors independently associated with hospital mortality included age (odds ratio = 1.18/year, 1.09-1.27), direct admission to the ICU (0.69, 0.54-0.87), day-1 SOFA excluding respiratory score (1.12/point, 1.08-1.16), PaO2/FiO(2) <100 (1.60, 1.03-2.48), and undetermined ARF etiology (1.43, 1.04-1.97). Initial oxygenation strategy did not affect mortality; however, IMV was associated with mortality, the odds ratio depending on IMV conditions: NIV + HFNC failure (2.31, 1.09-4.91), first-line IMV (2.55, 1.94-3.29), NIV failure (3.65, 2.05-6.53), standard oxygen failure (4.16, 2.91-5.93), and HFNC failure (5.54, 3.27-9.38). HFNC has an effect on intubation but not on mortality rates. Failure to identify ARF etiology is associated with higher rates of both intubation and mortality. This suggests that in addition to selecting the appropriate oxygenation device, clinicians should strive to identify the etiology of ARF.
  • Heby, Margareta; Karnevi, Emelie; Elebro, Jacob; Nodin, Björn; Eberhard, Jakob; Saukkonen, Kapo; Hagström, Jaana; Mustonen, Harri; Seppänen, Hanna; Haglund, Caj; Jirstrom, Karin; Larsson, Anna H. (2020)
    The outcome of periampullary adenocarcinomas remains poor with few treatment options. Podocalyxin-like protein (PODXL) is an anti-adhesive protein, the high expression of which has been shown to confer a poor prognosis in numerous malignancies. A correlation and adverse prognostic synergy between PODXL and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been observed in colorectal cancer. Here, we investigated whether this also applies to periampullary adenocarcinomas. We analyzed the immunohistochemical expression of PODXL and EGFR in tissue microarrays with tumors from two patient cohorts; (Cohort 1, n=175) and (Cohort 2, n=189). The effect of TGF-beta -induced expression and siRNA-mediated knockdown of PODXL and EGFR, were investigated in pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1) in vitro. We found a correlation between PODXL and EGFR in these cancers, and a synergistic adverse effect on survival. Furthermore, silencing PODXL in pancreatic cancer cells resulted in the down-regulation of EGFR, but not vice versa. Consequently, these findings suggest a functional link between PODXL and EGFR, and the potential combined utility as biomarkers possibly improving patient stratification. Further studies examining the mechanistic basis underlying these observations may open new avenues of targeted treatment options for subsets of patients affected by these particularly aggressive cancers.
  • Autio, Reija; Saarela, Matti; Jarvinen, Anna-Kaarina; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Astola, Jaakko (2009)
  • Kasanen, Henna; Hernberg, Micaela; Mäkelä, Siru; Brück, Oscar; Juteau, Susanna; Kohtamäki, Laura; Ilander, Mette; Mustjoki, Satu; Kreutzman, Anna (2020)
    Anti-PD1 treatment has improved the survival of metastatic melanoma patients, yet it is unknown which patients benefit from the treatment. In this exploratory study, we aimed to understand the effects of anti-PD1 therapy on the patients' immune system and discover the characteristics that would result in successful treatment. We collected peripheral blood (PB) samples from 17 immuno-oncology-naive metastatic melanoma patients before and after 1 and 3 months of anti-PD1 therapy. In addition, matching tumor biopsies at the time of diagnosis were collected for tissue microarray. The complete blood counts, PB immunophenotype, serum cytokine profiles, and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes were analyzed and correlated with the clinical data. Patients were categorized based on their disease control into responders (complete response, partial response, stable disease > 6 months, N = 11) and non-responders (progressive disease, stable disease