Browsing by Subject "CARDIOPULMONARY-RESUSCITATION"

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  • Böttiger, B. W.; Lockey, A.; Aickin, R.; Castren, M.; de Caen, A.; Escalante, R.; Kern, K. B.; Lim, S. H.; Nadkarni, V.; Neumar, R. W.; Nolan, J. P.; Stanton, D.; Wang, T. -L.; Perkins, G. D. (2018)
    "All citizens of the world can save a life". With these words, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) is launching the first global initiative - World Restart a Heart (WRAH) - to increase public awareness and therefore the rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for victims of cardiac arrest. In most of the cases, it takes too long for the emergency services to arrive on scene after the victim's collapse. Thus, the most effective way to increase survival and favourable outcome in cardiac arrest by two-to fourfold is early CPR by lay bystanders and by "first responders". Lay bystander resuscitation rates, however, differ significantly across the world, ranging from 5 to 80%. If all countries could have high lay bystander resuscitation rates, this would help to save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. In order to achieve this goal, all seven ILCOR councils have agreed to participate in WRAH 2018. Besides schoolchildren education in CPR ("KIDS SAVE LIVES"), many other initiatives have already been developed in different parts of the world. ILCOR is keen for the WRAH initiative to be as inclusive as possible, and that it should happen every year on 16 October or as close to that day as possible. Besides recommending CPR training for children and adults, it is hoped that a unified global message will enable our policy makers to take action to address the inequalities in patient survival around the world.
  • Wennlund, Klara Torlen; Kurland, Lisa; Olanders, Knut; Castren, Maaret; Bohm, Katarina (2022)
    Background The requirement concerning formal education for emergency medical dispatcher (EMD) is debated and varies, both nationally and internationally. There are few studies on the outcomes of emergency medical dispatching in relation to professional background. This study aimed to compare calls handled by an EMD with and without support by a registered nurse (RN), with respect to priority level, accuracy, and medical condition. Methods A retrospective observational study, performed on registry data from specific regions during 2015. The ambulance personnel's first assessment of the priority level and medical condition was used as the reference standard. Outcomes were: the proportion of calls dispatched with a priority in concordance with the ambulance personnel's assessment; over- and undertriage; the proportion of most adverse over- and undertriage; sensitivity, specificity and predictive values for each of the ambulance priorities; proportion of calls dispatched with a medical condition in concordance with the ambulance personnel's assessment. Proportions were reported with 95% confidence intervals. chi(2)-test was used for comparisons. P-levels < 0.05 were regarded as significant. Results A total of 25,025 calls were included (EMD n = 23,723, EMD + RN n = 1302). Analyses relating to priority and medical condition were performed on 23,503 and 21,881 calls, respectively. A dispatched priority in concordance with the ambulance personnel's assessment were: EMD n = 11,319 (50.7%) and EMD + RN n = 481 (41.5%) (p < 0.01). The proportion of overtriage was equal for both groups: EMD n = 5904, EMD + RN n = 306, (26.4%) p = 0.25). The proportion of undertriage for each group was: EMD n = 5122 (22.9%) and EMD + RN n = 371 (32.0%) (p < 0.01). Sensitivity for the most urgent priority was 54.6% for EMD, compared to 29.6% for EMD + RN (p < 0.01), and specificity was 67.3% and 84.8% (p < 0.01) respectively. A dispatched medical condition in concordance with the ambulance personnel's assessment were: EMD n = 13,785 (66.4%) and EMD + RN n = 697 (62.2%) (p = 0.01). Conclusions A higher precision of emergency medical dispatching was not observed when the EMD was supported by an RN. How patient safety is affected by the observed divergence in dispatched priorities is an area for future research.
  • Tirkkonen, Joonas; Hellevuo, Heidi; Olkkola, Klaus T.; Hoppu, Sanna (2016)
    Aim: Aetiology of in-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCAs) on general wards has not been studied. We aimed to determine the underlying causes for IHCAs by the means of autopsy records and clinical judgement of the treating consultants. Furthermore, we investigated whether aetiology and preceding vital dysfunctions are associated with long-term survival. Design and setting: Prospective observational study between 2009-2011 including 279 adult IHCA patients attended by medical emergency team in a Finnish university hospital's general wards. Results: The median age of the patients was 72 (64, 80) years, 185 (66%) were male, 178 (64%) of events were monitored/witnessed, first rhythm was shockable in 42 (15%) cases and 53 (19%) patients survived six months. Aetiology was determined as cardiac in 141 events, 73 of which were due to acute myocardial infarction. There were 138 non-cardiac IHCAs; most common causes were pneumonia (39) and exsanguination (16). No statistical difference was observed in the incidence of objective vital dysfunctions preceding the event between the cardiac and non-cardiac groups (40% vs. 44%, p = 0.448). Subjective antecedents were more common in the cardiac cohort (47% vs. 32%, p = 0.022), chest pain being an example (11% vs. 0.7%, p <0.001). Reviewing all 279 IHCAs, only shockable primary rhythm, monitored/witnessed event and low comorbidity score were independently associated with 180-day survival. Conclusions: Cardiac aetiology underlies half of the IHCAs on general wards. Both objective and subjective antecedents are common. However, neither the cardiac aetiology nor the absence of preceding deterioration of vital signs were factors independently associated with a favourable outcome. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Penketh, J. A.; Nolan, J. P.; Skrifvars, M. B.; Rylander, C.; Frenell; Tirkkonen, J.; Reynolds, E. C.; Parr, M. J. A.; Aneman, A. (2020)
    Aim: To determine the type of airway devices used during in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) resuscitation attempts. Methods: International multicentre retrospective observational study of in-patients aged over 18 years who received chest compressions for cardiac arrest from April 2016 to September 2018. Patients were identified from resuscitation registries and rapid response system databases. Data were collected through review of resuscitation records and hospital notes. Airway devices used during cardiac arrest were recorded as basic (adjuncts or bag-mask), or advanced, including supraglottic airway devices, tracheal tubes or tracheostomies. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression modelling were used for data analysis. Results: The final analysis included 598 patients. No airway management occurred in 36 (6%), basic airway device use occurred at any time in 562 (94%), basic airway device use without an advanced airway device in 182 (30%), tracheal intubation in 301 (50%), supraglottic airway in 102 (17%), and tracheostomy in 1 (0.2%). There was significant variation in airway device use between centres. The intubation rate ranged between 21% and 90% while supraglottic airway use varied between 1% and 45%. The choice of tracheal intubation vs. supraglottic airway as the second advanced airway device was not associated with immediate survival from the resuscitation attempt (odds ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.35-1.8). Conclusion: There is wide variation in airway device use during resuscitation after IHCA. Only half of patients are intubated before return of spontaneous circulation and many are managed without an advanced airway. Further investigation is needed to determine optimal airway device management strategies during resuscitation following IHCA.
  • Hiltunen, Pamela; Jantti, Helena; Silfvast, Tom; Kuisma, Markku; Kurola, Jouni; FINNRESUSCI Prehosp Study Grp (2016)
    Background: Though airway management methods during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remain controversial, no studies on the topic from Finland have examined adherence to OHCA recommendations in real life. In response, the aim of this study was to document the interventions, success rates, and adverse events in airway management processes in OHCA, as well as to analyse survival at hospital discharge and at follow-up a year later. Methods: During a 6-month study period in 2010, data regarding all patients with OHCA and attempted resuscitation in southern and eastern Finland were prospectively collected. Emergency medical services (EMS) documented the airway techniques used and all adverse events related to the process. Study endpoints included the frequency of different techniques used, their success rates, methods used to verify the correct placement of the endotracheal tube, overall adverse events, and survival at hospital discharge and at follow-up a year later. Results: A total of 614 patients were included in the study. The incidence of EMS-attempted resuscitation was determined to be 51/100,000 inhabitants per year. The final airway technique was endotracheal intubation (ETI) in 413 patients (67.3 %) and supraglottic airway device (SAD) in 188 patients (30.2 %). The overall success rate of ETI was 92.5 %, whereas that of SAD was 85.0 %. Adverse events were reported in 167 of the patients (27.2 %). Having a prehospital EMS physician on the scene (p Conclusions: This study showed acceptable ETI and SAD success rates among Finnish patients with OHCA. Adverse events related to airway management were observed in more than 25 % of patients, and overall survival was 17.8 % at hospital discharge and 14.0 % after 1 year.
  • Sainio, Marko; Sutton, Robert M.; Huhtala, Heini; Eilevstjonn, Joar; Tenhunen, Jyrki; Olkkola, Klaus T.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Hoppu, Sanna (2013)
    A 2-year-old boy found in cardiac arrest secondary to drowning received standard CPR for 35 minutes and was transported to a tertiary hospital for rewarming from hypothermia. Chest compressions in hospital were started using two-thumb encircling hands technique. Subsequently two-thumbs direct sternal compression technique and after sternal force/depth sensor placement, chest compression with classic one-hand technique were done. By using CPR recording/feedback defibrillator, quantitative CPR quality data and invasive arterial pressures were available for analyses for 5 hours and 35 minutes. 316 compressions with the two-thumb encircling hands technique provided a mean (SD) systolic arterial pressure (SAP) of 24 (4) mmHg, mean arterial pressure (MAP) 18 (3) and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) of 15 (3) mmHg. similar to 6000 compressions with the two thumbs direct compression technique created a mean SAP of 45 (7) mmHg, MAP 35 (4) mmHg and DAP of 30 (3) mmHg. similar to 20,000 compressions with the sternal accelerometer in place produced SAP 50 (10) mmHg, MAP 32 (5) mmHg and DAP 24 (4) mmHg. Restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) was achieved at the point when the child achieved normothermia by using peritoneal dialysis. Unfortunately, the child died ten hours after ROSC without any signs of neurological recovery. This case demonstrates improved hemodynamic parameters with classic one-handed technique with real-time quantitative quality of CPR feedback compared to either the two-thumbs encircling hands or two-thumbs direct sternal compression techniques. We speculate that the improved arterial pressures were related to improved chest compression depth when a real-time CPR recording/feedback device was deployed.
  • Perkins, Gavin D.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Haywood, Kirstie; Neumar, Robert W.; Lilja, Gisela; Rowland, Matthew J.; Sawyer, Kelly N.; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Nolan, Jerry P. (2021)
    As more people are surviving cardiac arrest, focus needs to shift towards improving neurological outcomes and quality of life in survivors. Brain injury after resuscitation, a common sequela following cardiac arrest, ranges in severity from mild impairment to devastating brain injury and brainstem death. Effective strategies to minimise brain injury after resuscitation include early intervention with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation, restoration of normal physiology, and targeted temperature management. It is important to identify people who might have a poor outcome, to enable informed choices about continuation or withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments. Multimodal prediction guidelines seek to avoid premature withdrawal in those who might survive with a good neurological outcome, or prolonging treatment that might result in survival with severe disability. Approximately one in three admitted to intensive care will survive, many of whom will need intensive, tailored rehabilitation after discharge to have the best outcomes.
  • Humaloja, Jaana; Ashton, Nicholas J.; Skrifvars, Markus B. (2022)
    This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2022. Other selected articles can be found online at https://www.biomedcentral.com/collections/annualupdate2022. Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from https://link. springer.com/bookseries/8901.
  • Yeung, J.; Matsuyama, T.; Bray, J.; Reynolds, J.; Skrifvars, M. B. (2019)
    Aim: To perform a systematic review to answer 'In adults with attempted resuscitation after non-traumatic cardiac arrest does care at a specialised cardiac arrest centre (CAC) compared to care in a healthcare facility not designated as a specialised cardiac arrest centre improve patient outcomes?' Methods: The PRISMA guidelines were followed. We searched bibliographic databases (Embase, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library (CENTRAL)) from inception to 1st August 2018. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-randomised studies were eligible for inclusion. Two reviewers independently scrutinized studies for relevance, extracted data and assessed quality of studies. Risk of bias of studies and quality of evidence were assessed using ROBINS-I tool and GRADEpro respectively. Primary outcomes were survival to 30 days with favourable neurological outcomes and survival to hospital discharge with favourable neurological outcomes. Secondary outcomes were survival to 30 days, survival to hospital discharge and return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) post-hospital arrival for patients with ongoing resuscitation. This systematic review was registered in PROSPERO (CRD 42018093369) Results: We included data from 17 observational studies on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients in meta-analyses. Overall, the certainty of evidence was very low. Pooling data from only adjusted analyses, care at CAC was not associated with increased likelihood of survival to 30 days with favourable neurological outcome (OR 2.92, 95% CI 0.68-12.48) and survival to 30 days (OR 2.14, 95% CI 0.73-6.29) compared to care at other hospitals. Whereas patients cared for at CACs had improved survival to hospital discharge with favourable neurological outcomes (OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.74-2.84) and survival to hospital discharge (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.46-2.34). Conclusions: Very low certainty of evidence suggests that post-cardiac arrest care at CACs is associated with improved outcomes at hospital discharge. There remains a need for high quality data to fully elucidate the impact of CACs.
  • Leopold, Valentine; Gayat, Etienne; Pirracchio, Romain; Spinar, Jindrich; Parenica, Jiri; Tarvasmäki, Tuukka; Lassus, Johan; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Champion, Sebastien; Zannad, Faiez; Valente, Serafina; Urban, Philip; Chua, Horng-Ruey; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Popovic, Batric; Ouweneel, Dagmar M.; Henriques, Jose P. S.; Simonis, Gregor; Levy, Bruno; Kimmoun, Antoine; Gaudard, Philippe; Basir, Mir Babar; Markota, Andrej; Adler, Christoph; Reuter, Hannes; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Chouihed, Tahar (2018)
    Catecholamines have been the mainstay of pharmacological treatment of cardiogenic shock (CS). Recently, use of epinephrine has been associated with detrimental outcomes. In the present study we aimed to evaluate the association between epinephrine use and short-term mortality in all-cause CS patients. We performed a meta-analysis of individual data with prespecified inclusion criteria: (1) patients in non-surgical CS treated with inotropes and/or vasopressors and (2) at least 15% of patients treated with epinephrine administrated alone or in association with other inotropes/vasopressors. The primary outcome was short-term mortality. Fourteen published cohorts and two unpublished data sets were included. We studied 2583 patients. Across all cohorts of patients, the incidence of epinephrine use was 37% (17-76%) and short-term mortality rate was 49% (21-69%). A positive correlation was found between percentages of epinephrine use and short-term mortality in the CS cohort. The risk of death was higher in epinephrine-treated CS patients (OR [CI] = 3.3 [2.8-3.9]) compared to patients treated with other drug regimens. Adjusted mortality risk remained striking in epinephrine-treated patients (n = 1227) (adjusted OR = 4.7 [3.4-6.4]). After propensity score matching, two sets of 338 matched patients were identified and epinephrine use remained associated with a strong detrimental impact on short-term mortality (OR = 4.2 [3.0-6.0]). In this very large cohort, epinephrine use for hemodynamic management of CS patients is associated with a threefold increase of risk of death.
  • Nolan, Jerry P.; Sandroni, Claudio; Andersen, Lars W.; Boettiger, Bernd W.; Cariou, Alain; Cronberg, Tobias; Friberg, Hans; Genbrugge, Cornelia; Lilja, Gisela; Morley, Peter T.; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Olasveengen, Theresa M.; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Taccone, Fabio S.; Soar, Jasmeet (2022)
    The aim of these guidelines is to provide evidence based guidance for temperature control in adults who are comatose after resuscitation from either in-hospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, regardless of the underlying cardiac rhythm. These guidelines replace the recommendations on temperature management after cardiac arrest included in the 2021 post-resuscitation care guidelines co-issued by the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM). The guideline panel included thirteen international clinical experts who authored the 2021 ERC-ESICM guidelines and two methodologists who participated in the evidence review completed on behalf of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) of whom ERC is a member society. We followed the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to assess the certainty of evidence and grade recommendations. The panel provided suggestions on guideline implementation and identified priorities for future research. The certainty of evidence ranged from moderate to low. In patients who remain comatose after cardiac arrest, we recommend continuous monitoring of core temperature and actively preventing fever (defined as a temperature > 37.7 degrees C) for at least 72 hours. There was insufficient evidence to recommend for or against temperature control at 32-36 degrees C or early cooling after cardiac arrest. We recommend not actively rewarming comatose patients with mild hypothermia after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) to achieve normothermia. We recommend not using prehospital cooling with rapid infusion of large volumes of cold intravenous fluids immediately after ROSC.
  • Int Liaison Comm Resuscitations IL; Neonatal Life Support Task Force E; Educ mentation Teams Task Force; Dainty, Katie N.; Atkins, Dianne L.; Breckwoldt, Jan; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Furuta, Marie (2021)
    Context: Parent/family presence at pediatric resuscitations has been slow to become consistent practice in hospital settings and has not been universally implemented. A systematic review of the literature on family presence during pediatric and neonatal resuscitation has not been previously conducted. Objective: To conduct a systematic review of the published evidence related to family presence during pediatric and neonatal resuscitation. Data sources: Six major bibliographic databases was undertaken with defined search terms and including literature up to June 14, 2020. Study selection: 3200 titles were retrieved in the initial search; 36 ultimately included for review. Data extraction: Data was double extracted independently by two reviewers and confirmed with the review team. All eligible studies were either survey or interview-based and as such we turned to narrative systematic review methodology. Results: The authors identified two key sets of findings: first, parents/family members want to be offered the option to be present for their child's resuscitation. Secondly, health care provider attitudes varied widely (ranging from 15% to >85%), however, support for family presence increased with previous experience and level of seniority. Limitations: English language only; lack of randomized control trials; quality of the publications. Conclusions: Parents wish to be offered the opportunity to be present but opinions and perspectives on the family presence vary greatly among health care providers. This topic urgently needs high quality, comparative research to measure the actual impact of family presence on patient, family and staff outcomes.
  • Hellevuo, H.; Sainio, M.; Huhtala, H.; Olkkola, K. T.; Tenhunen, J.; Hoppu, S. (2018)
    BackgroundThe survival rate of cardiac arrest patients is increasing. Our aim was to compare the quality of life before and after cardiac arrest and analyse the factors associated with outcome. MethodsAll adult cardiac arrest patients admitted to the Tampere University Hospital intensive care unit between 2009 and 2011 were included in a retrospective follow-up study if surviving to discharge and were asked to return a questionnaire after 6 months. Data on patient demographics and pre-arrest quality of life were retrieved from medical records. Data are given as means (SD) or medians [Q(1), Q(3)]. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with better quality of life after cardiac arrest. ResultsSix months after cardiac arrest, 36% (79/222) were alive and 70% (55/79) of those patients completed the follow-up EuroQoL (EQ-5D) quality of life questionnaire. Median values for the EQ-5D before and after cardiac arrest were 0.89 [0.63, 1] and 0.89 [0.62, 1], respectively (P = 0.75). Only the EQ-5D prior to cardiac arrest was associated with better quality of life afterwards (OR 1.2; 95% CI 1.0-1.3; P = 0.02). ConclusionsQuality of life remained good after cardiac arrest especially in those patients who had good quality of life before cardiac arrest.
  • Boettiger, B. W.; Bossaert, L. L.; Castren, M.; Cimpoesu, D.; Georgiou, M.; Greif, R.; Gruenfeld, M.; Lockey, A.; Lott, C.; Maconochie, I.; Melieste, R.; Monsieurs, K. G.; Nolan, J. P.; Perkins, G. D.; Raffay, V.; Schlieber, J.; Semeraro, F.; Soar, J.; Truhlar, A.; Van de Voorde, P.; Wyllie, J.; Wingen, S.; Board European Resuscitation Counc (2016)
  • Humaloja, Jaana; Vento, Maximo; Kuligowski, Julia; Andersson, Sture; Pineiro-Ramos, Jose David; Sanchez-Illana, Angel; Litonius, Erik; Jakkula, Pekka; Hästbacka, Johanna; Bendel, Stepani; Tiainen, Marjaana; Reinikainen, Matti; Skrifvars, Markus B. (2021)
    The products of polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation are considered reliable biomarkers of oxidative injury in vivo. We investigated ischemia-reperfusion-related oxidative injury by determining the levels of lipid peroxidation biomarkers (isoprostane, isofuran, neuroprostane, and neurofuran) after cardiac arrest and tested the associations between the biomarkers and different arterial oxygen tensions (PaO2). We utilized blood samples collected during the COMACARE trial (NCT02698917). In the trial, 123 patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were treated with a 10-15 kPa or 20-25 kPa PaO2 target during the initial 36 h in the intensive care unit. We measured the biomarker levels at admission, and 24, 48, and 72 h thereafter. We compared biomarker levels in the intervention groups and in groups that differed in oxygen exposure prior to randomization. Blood samples for biomarker determination were available for 112 patients. All four biomarker levels peaked at 24 h; the increase appeared greater in younger patients and in patients without bystander-initiated life support. No association between the lipid peroxidation biomarkers and oxygen exposure either before or after randomization was found. Increases in the biomarker levels during the first 24 h in intensive care suggest continuing oxidative stress, but the clinical relevance of this remains unresolved.
  • Pasquier, Mathieu; Hugli, Olivier; Paal, Peter; Darocha, Tomasz; Blancher, Marc; Husby, Paul; Silfvast, Tom; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Rousson, Valentin (2018)
    Aims: Currently, the decision to initiate extracorporeal life support for patients who suffer cardiac arrest due to accidental hypothermia is essentially based on serum potassium level. Our goal was to build a prediction score in order to determine the probability of survival following rewarming of hypothermic arrested patients based on several covariates available at admission. Methods: We included consecutive hypothermic arrested patients who underwent rewarming with extracorporeal life support. The sample comprised 237 patients identified through the literature from 18 studies, and 49 additional patients obtained from hospital data collection. We considered nine potential predictors of survival: age; sex; core temperature; serum potassium level; mechanism of hypothermia; cardiac rhythm at admission; witnessed cardiac arrest, rewarming method and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration prior to the initiation of extracorporeal life support. The primary outcome parameter was survival to hospital discharge. Results: Overall, 106 of the 286 included patients survived (37%; 95% CI: 32-43%), most (84%) with a good neurological outcome. The final score included the following variables: age, sex, core temperature at admission, serum potassium level, mechanism of cooling, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration. The corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.895 (95% CI: 0.859-0.931) compared to 0.774 (95% CI: 0.720-0.828) when based on serum potassium level alone. Conclusions: In this large retrospective study we found that our score was superior to dichotomous triage based on serum potassium level in assessing which hypothermic patients in cardiac arrest would benefit from extracorporeal life support. External validation of our findings is required.
  • Jousi, Milla; Saikko, Simo; Nurmi, Jouni (2017)
    Background: Point-of-care (POC) testing is highly useful when treating critically ill patients. In case of difficult vascular access, the intraosseous (IO) route is commonly used, and blood is aspirated to confirm the correct position of the IO-needle. Thus, IO blood samples could be easily accessed for POC analyses in emergency situations. The aim of this study was to determine whether IO values agree sufficiently with arterial values to be used for clinical decision making. Methods: Two samples of IO blood were drawn from 31 healthy volunteers and compared with arterial samples. The samples were analysed for sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, glucose, haemoglobin, haematocrit, pH, blood gases, base excess, bicarbonate, and lactate using the i-STAT (R) POC device. Agreement and reliability were estimated by using the Bland-Altman method and intraclass correlation coefficient calculations. Results: Good agreement was evident between the IO and arterial samples for pH, glucose, and lactate. Potassium levels were clearly higher in the IO samples than those from arterial blood. Base excess and bicarbonate were slightly higher, and sodium and ionised calcium values were slightly lower, in the IO samples compared with the arterial values. The blood gases in the IO samples were between arterial and venous values. Haemoglobin and haematocrit showed remarkable variation in agreement. Discussion: POC diagnostics of IO blood can be a useful tool to guide treatment in critical emergency care. Seeking out the reversible causes of cardiac arrest or assessing the severity of shock are examples of situations in which obtaining vascular access and blood samples can be difficult, though information about the electrolytes, acid-base balance, and lactate could guide clinical decision making. The analysis of IO samples should though be limited to situations in which no other option is available, and the results should be interpreted with caution, because there is not yet enough scientific evidence regarding the agreement of IO and arterial results among unstable patients. Conclusions: IO blood samples are suitable for analysis with the i-STAT (R) point-of-care device in emergency care. The aspirate used to confirm the correct placement of the IO needle can also be used for analysis. The results must be interpreted within a clinical context while taking the magnitude and direction of bias into account.
  • De Fazio, Chiara; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Soreide, Eldar; Creteur, Jacques; Grejs, Anders M.; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Laitio, Timo; Nee, Jens; Kirkegaard, Hans; Taccone, Fabio Silvio (2019)
    BackgroundThe aim of this study was to explore the performance and outcomes for intravascular (IC) versus surface cooling devices (SFC) for targeted temperature management (TTM) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.MethodsA retrospective analysis of data from the Time-differentiated Therapeutic Hypothermia (TTH48) trial (NCT01689077), which compared whether TTM at 33 degrees C for 48h results in better neurologic outcomes compared with standard 24-h duration. Devices were assessed for the speed of cooling and rewarming rates. Precision was assessed by measuring temperature variability (TV), i.e., the standard deviation (SD) of all temperature measurements in the cooling phase. Main outcomes were overall mortality and poor neurological outcome, including death, severe disability, or vegetative status.ResultsA total of 352 patients had available data and were included in the analysis; of those, 218 (62%) were managed with IC. A total of 114/218 (53%) patients with IC and 61/134 (43%) with SFC were cooled for 48h (p=0.22). Time to target temperature (34 degrees C) was significantly shorter for patients treated with endovascular devices (2.2 [1.1-4.0] vs. 4.2 [2.7-6.0] h, p
  • Bottiger, B. W.; Bossaert, L. L.; Castren, Maaret Kaarina; Cimpoesu, D.; Georgiou, M.; Greif, R.; Grunfeld, M.; Lockey, A.; Lott, C.; Maconochie, I.; Melieste, R.; Monsieurs, K. G.; Nolan, J. P.; Perkins, G. D.; Raffay, V.; Schlieber, J.; Semeraro, F.; Soar, J.; Truhlar, A.; Van de Voorde, P.; Wyllie, J.; Wingen, S. (2016)
  • Magliocca, Aurora; Olivari, Davide; De Giorgio, Dana; Zani, Davide; Manfredi, Martina; Boccardo, Antonio; Cucino, Alberto; Sala, Giulia; Babini, Giovanni; Ruggeri, Laura; Novelli, Deborah; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Hardig, Bjarne Madsen; Pravettoni, Davide; Staszewsky, Lidia; Latini, Roberto; Belloli, Angelo; Ristagno, Giuseppe (2019)
    Background-Mechanical chest compression (CC) is currently suggested to deliver sustained high-quality CC in a moving ambulance. This study compared the hemodynamic support provided by a mechanical piston device or manual CC during ambulance transport in a porcine model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Methods and Results-In a simulated urban ambulance transport, 16 pigs in cardiac arrest were randomized to 18 minutes of mechanical CC with the LUCAS (n=8) or manual CC (n=8). ECG, arterial and right atrial pressure, together with end-tidal CO2 and transthoracic impedance curve were continuously recorded. Arterial lactate was assessed during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and after resuscitation. During the initial 3 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the ambulance was stationary, while then proceeded along a predefined itinerary. When the ambulance was stationary, CC-generated hemodynamics were equivalent in the 2 groups. However, during ambulance transport, arterial and coronary perfusion pressure, and end-tidal CO(2 )were significantly higher with mechanical CC compared with manual CC (coronary perfusion pressure: 43 +/- 4 versus 18 +/- 4 mmHg; end-tidal CO2: 31 +/- 2 versus 19 +/- 2 mmHg, P Conclusions-This model adds evidence in favor of the use of mechanical devices to provide ongoing high-quality CC and tissue perfusion during ambulance transport.