Browsing by Subject "CENTRAL SWEDEN"

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  • Väliranta, Minna; Salojärvi, Niina; Vuorsalo, Annina; Juutinen, Sari; Korhola, Atte; Luoto, Miska; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina (2017)
    Minerotrophic fens and ombrotrophic bogs differ in their nutrient status, hydrology, vegetation and carbon dynamics, and their geographical distribution is linked to various climate parameters. Currently, bogs dominate the northern temperate and southern boreal zones but climate warming may cause a northwards shift in the distribution of the bog zone. To more profoundly understand the sensitivity of peatlands to changes in climate, we first used the plant macrofossil method to identify plant communities that are characteristic of past fen-bog transitions. These transitions were radiocarbon dated, to be linked to Holocene climate phases. Subsequently, palaeoecological data were combined with an extensive vegetation survey dataset collected along the current fen-bog ecotone in Finland where we studied how the distribution of the key plant species identified from peat records is currently related to the most important environmental variables. The fossil plant records revealed clear successional phases: an initial Carex-dominated fen phase, an Eriophorum vaginatum-dominated oligotrophic fen phase followed by an early bog phase with wet bog Sphagna. This was occasionally followed by a dry ombrotrophic bog phase. Timing of initiation and phase transitions, and duration of succession phases varied between three sites studied. However, the final ombrotrophication occurred during 2000-3000 cal. BP corresponding to the neoglacial cooling phase. Dry mid-Holocene seems to have facilitated initiation of Eriophorum fens. The peatlands surveyed in the fen-bog ecotone were classified into succession phases based on the key species distribution. In 33% of the studied peatlands, Sphagnum had taken over and we interpret they are going through a final transition from fen to bog. In addition to autogenic processes and direct climate impact, our results showed that ecosystem shifts are also driven by allogenic disturbances, such as fires, suggesting that climate change can indirectly assist the ombrotrophication process in the southern border of the fen-bog ecotone.
  • Bispo-Santos, Franklin; D’Agrella-Filho, Manoel S.; Pesonen, Lauri J.; Salminen, Johanna M.; Reis, Nelson J.; Silva, Julia Massucato (2020)
    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the paleomagnetic data of the Amazonian Craton, with important geodynamic and paleogeographic implications for the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic Columbia supercontinent (a.k.a., Nuna, Hudsoland). Despite recent increase of paleomagnetic data for several other cratons in Columbia, its longevity and the geodynamic processes that resulted in its formation are not well known. A paleomagnetic study was performed on rocks from the similar to 1535 Ma AMG (Anorthosite-Mangerite-Rapakivi Granite) Mucajai Complex located in the Roraima State (Brazil), in the northern portion of the Amazonian Craton, the Guiana Shield. Thermal and AF treatments revealed northwestern/southeastern directions with upward/downward inclinations for samples from twelve sites. This characteristic remanent magnetization is mainly carried by Ti-poor magnetite and in a lesser amount by hematite. Site mean directions were combined with previous results obtained for three other sites from the Mucajai Complex, producing the dual polarity mean direction: Dm = 132.2 degrees; Im = 35.4 degrees (N = 15; alpha(95) = 12.7 degrees; k = 10.0) and a paleomagnetic pole located at 0.1 degrees E, 38.2 degrees S (A(95) = 12.6 degrees; K = 10.2). The Mucajai pole favours the SAMBA (South AMerica-BAltica) link in a configuration formed by Amazonia and Baltica in Columbia. Also, there is geological and paleomagnetic evidence that the juxtaposition of Baltica and Laurentia at 1.76-1.26 Ga forms the core of Columbia. The present paleomagnetic data predict a long life 1.78-1.43 Ga SAMBA connection forming part of the core of the supercontinent. (c) 2019 International Association for Gondwana Research. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.