Browsing by Subject "CHEMOPREVENTION"

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  • The CAPP2 Investigators; Burn, John; Sheth, Harsh; Elliott, Faye; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Seppälä, Toni T.; Pylvänäinen, Kirsi; Bishop, D Timothy (2020)
    Background Lynch syndrome is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer and with a broader spectrum of cancers, especially endometrial cancer. In 2011, our group reported long-term cancer outcomes (mean follow-up 55.7 months [SD 31.4]) for participants with Lynch syndrome enrolled into a randomised trial of daily aspirin versus placebo. This report completes the planned 10-year follow-up to allow a longer-term assessment of the effect of taking regular aspirin in this high-risk population. Methods In the double-blind, randomised CAPP2 trial, 861 patients from 43 international centres worldwide (707 [82%] from Europe, 112 [13%] from Australasia, 38 [4%] from Africa, and four [ Findings Between January, 1999, and March, 2005, 937 eligible patients with Lynch syndrome, mean age 45 years, commenced treatment, of whom 861 agreed to be randomly assigned to the aspirin group or placebo; 427 (50%) participants received aspirin and 434 (50%) placebo. Participants were followed for a mean of 10 years approximating 8500 person-years. 40 (9%) of 427 participants who received aspirin developed colorectal cancer compared with 58 (13%) of 434 who received placebo. Intention-to-treat Cox proportional hazards analysis revealed a significantly reduced hazard ratio (HR) of 0.65 (95% CI 0.43-0.97; p= 0. 035) for aspirin versus placebo. Negative binomial regression to account for multiple primary events gave an incidence rate ratio of 0.58 (0.39-0.87; p=0.0085). Per-protocol analyses restricted to 509 who achieved 2 years' intervention gave an HR of 0 .56 (0 .34-0 .91; p=0 .019) and an incidence rate ratio of 0.50 (0.31-0.82; p=0.0057). Non-colorectal Lynch syndrome cancers were reported in 36 participants who received aspirin and 36 participants who received placebo. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses showed no effect. For all Lynch syndrome cancers combined, the intention-to-treat analysis did not reach significance but per-protocol analysis showed significantly reduced overall risk for the aspirin group (HR=0.63, 0 .43-0 .92; p=0.018). Adverse events during the intervention phase between aspirin and placebo groups were similar, and no significant difference in compliance between intervention groups was observed for participants with complete intervention phase data; details reported previously. Interpretation The case for prevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin in Lynch syndrome is supported by our results. Copyright (C) 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • Kolsi, Laura E.; Leal, Ana S.; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Liby, Karen T.; Moreira, Vânia M. (2018)
    Low 5-year survival rates, increasing incidence, as well as the specific challenges of targeting pancreatic cancer, clearly support an urgent need for new multifunctional drugs for the prevention and treatment of this fatal disease. Natural products, such as abietane-type diterpenoids, are widely studied as promiscuous anticancer agents. In this study, dehydroabietic oximes were identified as potential compounds to target pancreatic cancer and cancer-related inflammation. The compounds inhibited the growth of human pancreatic cancer Aspc-1 cells with IC50 values in the low micromolar range and showed anti-inflammatory activity, measured as the inhibition of nitric oxide production, an important inflammatory mediator in the tumour microenvironment. Further studies revealed that the compounds were able to induce cancer cell differentiation and concomitantly downregulate cyclin D1 expression with upregulation of p27 levels, consistent with cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Moreover, a kinase profiling study showed that one of the compounds has isoform-selective, however modest, inhibitory activity on RSK2, an AGC kinase that has been implicated in cellular invasion and metastasis.
  • Bousquet, Jean; Le Moing, Vincent; Blain, Hubert; Czarlewski, Wienczyslawa; Zuberbier, Torsten; Torre, Raphael de la; Lozano, Nieves Pizarro; Reynes, Jacques; Bedbrook, Anna; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Cruz, Alvaro A.; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Haahtela, Tari; Iaccarino, Guido; Klimek, Ludger; Kuna, Piotr; Melén, Erik; Mullol, Joaquim; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Valiulis, Arunas; Anto, Josep M. (2021)
    COVID-19 is described in a clinical case involving a patient who proposed the hypothesis that Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)-interacting nutrients may help to prevent severe COVID-19 symptoms. Capsules of broccoli seeds containing glucoraphanin were being taken before the onset of SARS-CoV-2 infection and were continued daily for over a month after the first COVID-19 symptoms. They were found to reduce many of the symptoms rapidly and for a duration of 6-12 h by repeated dosing. When the patient was stable but still suffering from cough and nasal obstruction when not taking the broccoli capsules, a double-blind induced cough challenge confirmed the speed of onset of the capsules (less than 10 min). A second clinical case with lower broccoli doses carried out during the cytokine storm confirmed the clinical benefits already observed. A third clinical case showed similar effects at the onset of symptoms. In the first clinical trial, we used a dose of under 600 mmol per day of glucoraphanin. However, such a high dose may induce pharmacologic effects that require careful examination before the performance of any study. It is likely that the fast onset of action is mediated through the TRPA1 channel. These experimental clinical cases represent a proof-of-concept confirming the hypothesis that Nrf2interacting nutrients are effective in COVID-19. However, this cannot be used in practice before the availability of further safety data, and confirmation is necessary through proper trials on efficacy and safety.
  • Yatkin, Emrah; Polari, Lauri; Laajala, Teemu D.; Smeds, Annika; Eckerman, Christer; Holmbom, Bjarne; Saarinen, Niina M.; Aittokallio, Tero; Makela, Sari I. (2014)