Browsing by Subject "CHROMOSOME"

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  • Garderet, Laurent; Ziagkos, Dimitris; Van Biezen, Anja; Iacobelli, Simona; Finke, Juergen; Maertens, Johan; Volin, Liisa; Ljungman, Per; Chevallier, Patrice; Passweg, Jakob; Schaap, Nicolaas; Beelen, Dietrich; Nagler, Arnon; Blaise, Didier; Poire, Xavier; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Lenhoff, Stig; Craddock, Charles; Schots, Rik; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Sanz, Jaime; Jindra, Pavel; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Robin, Marie; Kroeger, Nicolaus (2018)
    The deletion (5q) karyotype (del [5q]) in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is the most common karyotypic abnormality in de novo MDS. An increased number of blasts and additional karyotypic abnormalities (del [al]+) are associated with a poor outcome. We analyzed the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT) in patients suffering from MDS with only del (5q) or del (5q)+. A total of 162 patients, of median age 54 years (range, 9 to 73), having MDS and del (5q) abnormalities received HCT from identical siblings (n = 87) or unrelated donors (n = 75). The cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality and relapse incidence at 4 years was 29% (95% CI, 22 to 36) and 46% (95% CI, 38 to 54), whereas the estimated 4 year survival, relapse-free and overall, was 25% (95% CI, 18 to 33) and 30% (95% CI, 23 to 38), respectively. In a multivariate analysis patients with del (5q) and a blast excess displayed poorer survival (hazard ratio, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.44 to 3.93; P
  • Oswald, Evelyn; Kirschberg, Matthias; Aubin, Francois; Alonso, Angel; Hufbauer, Martin; Akguel, Baki; Auvinen, Eeva (2019)
    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) of genus betapapillomavirus (betaHPV) are implicated in skin carcinogenesis, but their exact role in keratinocyte transformation is poorly understood. We show an interaction of HPV5 and HPV8 oncoproteins E6 and E7 with the nuclear mitotic apparatus protein 1 (NuMA). Binding of E6 or E7 to NuMA induces little aneuploidy, cell cycle alterations, or aberrant centrosomes. Intracellular localization of NuMA is not altered by E6 and E7 expression in 2D cultures. However, the localization profile is predominantly cytoplasmic in 3D organotypic skin models. Both viral proteins colocalize with NuMA in interphase cells, while only E7 colocalizes with NuMA in mitotic cells. Intriguingly, a small subset of cells shows E7 at only one spindle pole, whereas NuMA is present at both poles. This dissimilar distribution of E7 at the spindle poles may alter cell differentiation, which may in turn be relevant for betaHPV-induced skin carcinogenesis.
  • Lundin, Catarina; Forestier, Erik; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Autio, Kirsi; Barbany, Gisela; Cavelier, Lucia; Golovleva, Irina; Heim, Sverre; Heinonen, Kristiina; Hovland, Randi; Johannsson, Johann H.; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Nordgren, Ann; Palmqvist, Lars; Johansson, Bertil; Nordic Soc Pediat Hematology Oncol; Swedish Cytogenetic Leukemia Study; NOPHO Leukemia Cytogenetic Study G (2014)
  • Nyholm, Outi; Halkilahti, Jani; Wiklund, Gudrun; Okeke, Uche; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Haukka, Kaisa; Siitonen, Anja (2015)
    Background Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) cause serious foodborne infections in humans. These two pathogroups are defined based on the pathogroup-associated virulence genes: stx encoding Shiga toxin (Stx) for STEC and elt encoding heat-labile and/or est encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) for ETEC. The study investigated the genomics of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains to determine their phylogenetic position among E. coli and to define the virulence genes they harbor. Methods The whole genomes of three STEC/ETEC strains possessing both stx and est genes were sequenced using PacBio RS sequencer. Two of the strains were isolated from the patients, one with hemolytic uremic syndrome, and one with diarrhea. The third strain was of bovine origin. Core genome analysis of the shared chromosomal genes and comparison with E. coli and Shigella spp. reference genomes was performed to determine the phylogenetic position of the STEC/ETEC strains. In addition, a set of virulence genes and ETEC colonization factors were extracted from the genomes. The production of Stx and ST were studied. Results The human STEC/ETEC strains clustered with strains representing ETEC, STEC, entero-aggregative E. coli, and commensal and laboratory-adapted E. coli. However, the bovine STEC/ETEC strain formed a remote cluster with two STECs of bovine origin. All three STEC/ETEC strains harbored several other virulence genes, apart from stx and est, and lacked ETEC colonization factors. Two STEC/ETEC strains produced both toxins and one strain Stx only. Conclusions This study shows that pathogroup-associated virulence genes of different E. coli can coexist in strains originating from different phylogenetic lineages. The possibility of virulence genes to be associated with several E. coli pathogroups should be taken into account in strain typing and in epidemiological surveillance. Development of novel hybrid E. coli strains may cause a new public health risk, which challenges the traditional diagnostics of E. coli infections.
  • Kalendar, Ruslan; Raskina, Olga; Belyayev, Alexander; Schulman, Alan (2020)
    Retrotransposable elements are widely distributed and diverse in eukaryotes. Their copy number increases through reverse-transcription-mediated propagation, while they can be lost through recombinational processes, generating genomic rearrangements. We previously identified extensive, structurally uniform retrotransposon groups in which no member contains the gag, pol, or env internal domains. Because of the lack of protein-coding capacity, these groups are non-autonomous in replication, even if transcriptionally active. The Cassandra element belongs to the non-autonomous group called terminal-repeat retrotransposons in miniature (TRIM). It carries 5S RNA sequences with conserved RNA polymerase (pol) III promoters and terminators in its long terminal repeats (LTRs). Here, we identified multiple extended tandem arrays of Cassandra retrotransposons within different plant species, including ferns. At least 12 copies of repeated LTRs (as the tandem unit) and internal domain (as a spacer), giving a pattern that resembles the cellular 5S rRNA genes, were identified. Cytogenetic analysis revealed the specific chromosomal pattern of the Cassandra retrotransposon with prominent clustering at and around 5S rDNA loci. The secondary structure of the Cassandra retroelement RNA is predicted to form super-loops, in which the two LTRs are complementary to each other and can initiate local recombination, leading to the tandem arrays of Cassandra elements. The array structures are conserved for Cassandra retroelements of different species. We speculate that recombination events similar to those of 5S rRNA genes may explain the wide variation in Cassandra copy number. Likewise, the organization of 5S rRNA gene sequences is very variable in flowering plants; part of what is taken for 5S gene copy variation may be variation in Cassandra number. The role of the Cassandra 5S sequences remains to be established.