Browsing by Subject "CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA"

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  • Schrader, A.; Crispatzu, G.; Oberbeck, S.; Mayer, P.; Pützer, S.; von Jan, J.; Vasyutina, E.; Warner, K.; Weit, N.; Pflug, N.; Braun, T.; Andersson, E. I.; Yadav, B.; Riabinska, A.; Maurer, B.; Ferreira, M. S. Ventura; Beier, F.; Altmueller, J.; Lanasa, M.; Herling, C. D.; Haferlach, T.; Stilgenbauer, S.; Hopfinger, G.; Peifer, M.; Brümmendorf, T. H.; Nürnberg, P.; Elenitoba-Johnson, K. S. J.; Zha, S.; Hallek, M.; Moriggl, R.; Reinhardt, H. C.; Stern, M. -H.; Mustjoki, S.; Newrzela, S.; Frommolt, P.; Herling, M. (2018)
    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare and poor-prognostic mature T-cell malignancy. Here we integrated large-scale profiling data of alterations in gene expression, allelic copy number (CN), and nucleotide sequences in 111 well-characterized patients. Besides prominent signatures of T-cell activation and prevalent clonal variants, we also identify novel hot-spots for CN variability, fusion molecules, alternative transcripts, and progression-associated dynamics. The overall lesional spectrum of T-PLL is mainly annotated to axes of DNA damage responses, T-cell receptor/cytokine signaling, and histone modulation. We formulate a multi-dimensional model of T-PLL pathogenesis centered around a unique combination of TCL1 overexpression with damaging ATM aberrations as initiating core lesions. The effects imposed by TCL1 cooperate with compromised ATM toward a leukemogenic phenotype of impaired DNA damage processing. Dysfunctional ATM appears inefficient in alleviating elevated redox burdens and telomere attrition and in evoking a p53-dependent apoptotic response to genotoxic insults. As non-genotoxic strategies, synergistic combinations of p53 reactivators and deacetylase inhibitors reinstate such cell death execution.
  • Bulanova, Daria; Ianevski, Aleksandr; Bugai, Andrii; Akimov, Yevhen; Kuivanen, Suvi; Paavilainen, Henrik; Kakkola, Laura; Nandania, Jatin; Turunen, Laura; Ohman, Tiina; Ala-Hongisto, Hanna; Pesonen, Hanna M.; Kuisma, Marika S.; Honkimaa, Anni; Walton, Emma L.; Oksenych, Valentyn; Lorey, Martina B.; Guschin, Dmitry; Shim, Jungmin; Kim, Jinhee; Than, Thoa T.; Chang, So Young; Hukkanen, Veijo; Kulesskiy, Evgeny; Marjomaki, Varpu S.; Julkunen, Ilkka; Nyman, Tuula A.; Matikainen, Sampsa; Saarela, Jani S.; Sane, Famara; Hober, Didier; Gabriel, Guelsah; De Brabander, Jef K.; Martikainen, Miika; Windisch, Marc P.; Min, Ji-Young; Bruzzone, Roberto; Aittokallio, Tero; Vaha-Koskela, Markus; Vapalahti, Olli; Pulk, Arto; Velagapudi, Vidya; Kainov, Denis E. (2017)
    Viral diseases remain serious threats to public health because of the shortage of effective means of control. To combat the surge of viral diseases, new treatments are urgently needed. Here we show that small-molecules, which inhibit cellular anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins (Bcl-2i), induced the premature death of cells infected with different RNA or DNA viruses, whereas, at the same concentrations, no toxicity was observed in mock-infected cells. Moreover, these compounds limited viral replication and spread. Surprisingly, Bcl-2i also induced the premature apoptosis of cells transfected with viral RNA or plasmid DNA but not of mock-transfected cells. These results suggest that Bcl-2i sensitizes cells containing foreign RNA or DNA to apoptosis. A comparison of the toxicity, antiviral activity, and side effects of six Bcl-2i allowed us to select A-1155463 as an antiviral lead candidate. Thus, our results pave the way for the further development of Bcl-2i for the prevention and treatment of viral diseases.
  • Siltanen, Sanna; Fischer, Daniel; Rantapero, Tommi; Laitinen, Virpi; Mpindi, John Patrick; Kallioniemi, Olli; Wahlfors, Tiina; Schleutker, Johanna (2013)
  • Cuesta-Mateos, Carlo; Fuentes, Patricia; Schrader, Alexandra; Juarez-Sanchez, Raquel; Loscertales, Javier; Mateu-Albero, Tamara; Vega-Piris, Lorena; Espartero-Santos, Marina; Marcos-Jimenez, Ana; Sanchez-Lopez, Blanca Andrea; Perez-Garcia, Yaiza; Jungherz, Dennis; Oberbeck, Sebastian; Wahnschaffe, Linus; Kreutzman, Anna; Andersson, Emma I.; Mustjoki, Satu; Faber, Edgar; Urzainqui, Ana; Fresno, Manuel; Stamatakis, Kostantino; Alfranca, Arantzazu; Terron, Fernando; Herling, Marco; Toribio, Maria Luisa; Munoz-Calleja, Cecilia (2020)
    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a poor prognostic disease with very limited options of efficient therapies. Most patients are refractory to chemotherapies and despite high response rates after alemtuzumab, virtually all patients relapse. Therefore, there is an unmet medical need for novel therapies in T-PLL. As the chemokine receptor CCR7 is a molecule expressed in a wide range of malignancies and relevant in many tumor processes, the present study addressed the biologic role of this receptor in T-PLL. Furthermore, we elucidated the mechanisms of action mediated by an anti-CCR7 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and evaluated whether its anti-tumor activity would warrant development towards clinical applications in T-PLL. Our results demonstrate that CCR7 is a prognostic biomarker for overall survival in T-PLL patients and a functional receptor involved in the migration, invasion, and survival of leukemic cells. Targeting CCR7 with a mAb inhibited ligand-mediated signaling pathways and induced tumor cell killing in primary samples. In addition, directing antibodies against CCR7 was highly effective in T-cell leukemia xenograft models. Together, these findings make CCR7 an attractive molecule for novel mAb-based therapeutic applications in T-PLL, a disease where recent drug screen efforts and studies addressing new compounds have focused on chemotherapy or small molecules.
  • Harjunpää, Heidi; Llort Asens, Marc; Guenther, Carla; Fagerholm, Susanna C. (2019)
    The immune system and cancer have a complex relationship with the immune system playing a dual role in tumor development. The effector cells of the immune system can recognize and kill malignant cells while immune system-mediated inflammation can also promote tumor growth and regulatory cells suppress the anti-tumor responses. In the center of all anti-tumor responses is the ability of the immune cells to migrate to the tumor site and to interact with each other and with the malignant cells. Cell adhesion molecules including receptors of the immunoglobulin superfamily and integrins are of crucial importance in mediating these processes. Particularly integrins play a vital role in regulating all aspects of immune cell function including immune cell trafficking into tissues, effector cell activation and proliferation and the formation of the immunological synapse between immune cells or between immune cell and the target cell both during homeostasis and during inflammation and cancer. In this review we discuss the molecular mechanisms regulating integrin function and the role of integrins and other cell adhesion molecules in immune responses and in the tumor microenvironment. We also describe how malignant cells can utilize cell adhesion molecules to promote tumor growth and metastases and how these molecules could be targeted in cancer immunotherapy.
  • Boije af Gennäs, Gustav; Talman, Virpi; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Tuominen, Raimo K.; Ekokoski, Elina (2011)
    The second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) plays a central role in the signal transduction of G-protein coupled receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases by binding to C1 domain of effector proteins. C1 domain was first identified in protein kinase C (PKC) which comprises a family of ten isoforms that play roles in diverse cellular processes such as proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. Aberrant signaling through PKC isoforms and other C1 domain-containing proteins has been implicated in several pathological disorders. Drug discovery concerning C1 domains has exploited both natural products and rationally designed compounds. Currently, molecules from several classes of C1 domain-binding compounds are in clinical trials; however, still more have the potential to enter the drug development pipeline. This review gives a summary of the recent developments in C1 domain-binding compounds.
  • Benard-Slagter, Anne; Zondervan, Ilse; de Groot, Karel; Ghazavi, Farzaneh; Sarhadi, Virinder; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; De Moerloose, Barbara; Schwab, Claire; Vettenranta, Kim; Harrison, Christine J.; Knuutila, Sakari; Schouten, Jan; Lammens, Tim; Savola, Suvi (2017)
    Recurrent and clonal genetic alterations are characteristic of different subtypes of T- and B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and several subtypes are strong independent predictors of clinical outcome. A next-generation sequencing based multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification variant (digitalMLPA) has been developed enabling simultaneous detection of copy number alterations (CNAs) of up to 1000 target sequences. This novel digitalMLPA assay was designed and optimized to detect CNAs of 56 key target genes and regions in ALL. A set of digital karyotyping probes has been included for the detection of gross ploidy changes, to determine the extent of CNAs, while also serving as reference probes for data normalization. Sixty-seven ALL patient samples (including B- and T-cell ALL), previously characterized for genetic aberrations by standard MLPA, array comparative genomic hybridization, and/or single-nucleotide polymorphism array, were analyzed single blinded using digitalMLPA. The digitalMLPA assay reliably identified whole chromosome losses and gains (including high hyperdiploidy), whole gene deletions or gains, intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21, fusion genes, and intragenic deletions, which were confirmed by other methods. Furthermore, subclonal alterations were reliably detected if present in at least 20% to 30% of neoplastic cells. The diagnostic sensitivity of the digitaLMLPA assay was 98.9%, and the specificity was 97.8%. These results merit further consideration of digitalMLPA as a valuable alternative for genetic work-up of newly diagnosed ALL patients.
  • Dietrich, Sascha; Oles, Malgorzata; Lu, Junyan; Sellner, Leopold; Anders, Simon; Velten, Britta; Wu, Bian; Huellein, Jennifer; Liberio, Michelle da Silva; Walther, Tatjana; Wagner, Lena; Rabe, Sophie; Ghidelli-Disse, Sonja; Bantscheff, Marcus; Oles, Andrzej K.; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Mock, Andreas; Oakes, Christopher C.; Wang, Shihui; Oppermann, Sina; Lukas, Marina; Kim, Vladislav; Sill, Martin; Benner, Axel; Jauch, Anna; Sutton, Lesley Ann; Young, Emma; Rosenquist, Richard; Liu, Xiyang; Jethwa, Alexander; Lee, Kwang Seok; Lewis, Joe; Putzker, Kerstin; Lutz, Christoph; Rossi, Davide; Mokhir, Andriy; Oellerich, Thomas; Zirlik, Katja; Herling, Marco; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Plass, Christoph; Andersson, Emma; Mustjoki, Satu; von Kalle, Christof; Ho, Anthony D.; Hensel, Manfred; Duerig, Jan; Ringshausen, Ingo; Zapatka, Marc; Huber, Wolfgang; Zenz, Thorsten (2018)
    As new generations of targeted therapies emerge and tumor genome sequencing discovers increasingly comprehensive mutation repertoires, the functional relationships of mutations to tumor phenotypes remain largely unknown. Here, we measured ex vivo sensitivity of 246 blood cancers to 63 drugs alongside genome, transcriptome, and DNA methylome analysis to understand determinants of drug response. We assembled a primary blood cancer cell encyclopedia data set that revealed disease-specific sensitivities for each cancer. Within chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), responses to 62% of drugs were associated with 2 or more mutations, and linked the B cell receptor (BCR) pathway to trisomy 12, an important driver of CLL. Based on drug responses, the disease could be organized into phenotypic subgroups characterized by exploitable dependencies on BCR, mTOR, or MEK signaling and associated with mutations, gene expression, and DNA methylation. Fourteen percent of CLLs were driven by mTOR signaling in a non-BCR-dependent manner. Multivariate modeling revealed immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene (IGHV) mutation status and trisomy 12 as the most important modulators of response to kinase inhibitors in CLL. Ex vivo drug responses were associated with outcome. This study overcomes the perception that most mutations do not influence drug response of cancer, and points to an updated approach to understanding tumor biology, with implications for biomarker discovery and cancer care.
  • Kiesewetter, Barbara; Cherny, Nathan I.; Boissel, Nicolas; Cerisoli, Francesco; Dafni, Urania; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Ghia, Paolo; Goekbuget, Nicola; Gonzalez-Calle, Veronica; Huntly, Brian; Jaeger, Ulrich; Latino, Nicola Jane; Douillard, Jean-Yves; Malcovati, Luca; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Porkka, Kimmo; Raderer, Markus; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Scarfo, Lydia; Wester, Ruth; Zygoura, Panagiota; Sonneveld, Pieter (2020)
    Objective Value frameworks in oncology have not been validated for the assessment of treatments in haematological malignancies, but to avoid overlaps and duplications it appears reasonable to build up experience on existing value frameworks, such as the European Society for Medical Oncology-Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS). Methods Here we present the results of the first feasibility testing of the ESMO-MCBS v1.1 for haematological malignancies based on the grading of 80 contemporary studies for acute leukaemia, chronic leukaemia, lymphoma, myeloma and myelodysplastic syndromes. The aims were (1) to evaluate the scorability of data, (2) to evaluate the reasonableness of the generated grades for clinical benefit using the current version and (3) to identify shortcomings in the ESMO-MCBS v1.1 that require amendments to improve the efficacy and validity of the scale in grading new treatments in the management of haematological malignancies. Results In general, the ESMO-MCBS v1.1 was found to be widely applicable to studies in haematological malignancies, generating scores that were judged as reasonable by European Hematology Association (EHA) experts. A small number of studies could either not be graded or were not appropriately graded. The reasons, related to the differences between haematological and solid tumour malignancies, are identified and described. Conclusions Based on the findings of this study, ESMO and EHA are committed to develop a version of the ESMO-MCBS that is validated for haematological malignancies. This development process will incorporate all of the usual stringencies for accountability of reasonableness that have characterised the development of the ESMO-MCBS including field testing, statistical modelling, evaluation for reasonableness and openness to appeal and revision. Applying such a scale will support future public policy decision-making regarding the value of new treatments for haematological malignancies and will provide insights that could be helpful in the design of future clinical trials.
  • Jerkeman, Mats; Eskelund, Christian Winther; Hutchings, Martin; Räty, Riikka; Wader, Karin Fahl; Laurell, Anna; Toldbod, Helle; Pedersen, Lone Bredo; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Dahl, Christina; Kuitunen, Hanne; Geisler, Christian H.; Gronbaek, Kirsten; Kolstad, Arne (2018)
    Background Regimens based on ibrutinib alone and lenalidomide and rituximab in combination show high activity in patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma. We hypothesised that the combination of all three drugs would improve efficacy compared with previously published data on either regimen alone. Methods In this multicentre, open-label, single-arm, phase 2 trial, we enrolled patients aged 18 years or older with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma who had previously been treated with at least one rituximab-containing regimen, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score of 0-3, and at least one site of measurable disease, and who met criteria for several laboratory-assessed parameters. Treatment was divided into an induction phase of 12 cycles of 28 days with all three drugs and a maintenance phase with ibrutinib and rituximab only (cycle duration 56 days), given until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. In the induction phase, patients received intravenous (375 mg/m(2)) or subcutaneous (1400 mg) rituximab once a week during cycle 1 and then once every 8 weeks. Oral ibrutinib (560 mg once a day) was given to patients every day in the cycle, whereas oral lenalidomide (15 mg once a day) was given on days 1-21. The primary endpoint was overall response assessed in the intention-totreat population according to Lugano criteria. Safety analysis included all patients who received the treatment, irrespective of eligibility or duration of treatment. The trial is ongoing, but is no longer accruing patients, and is registered with ClinicalTrials. gov, number NCT02460276. Findings Between April 30, 2015, and June 1, 2016, we enrolled 50 patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma at ten centres in Sweden, Finland, Norway, and Denmark. At a median follow-up of 17.8 months (IQR 14.7-20.9), 38 (76%, 95% CI 63-86) patients had an overall response, including 28 (56%, 42-69) patients who had a complete response and ten (20%, 11-33) who had a partial response. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events were neutropenia (in 19 [38%] of 50 patients), infections (in 11 [22%] patients), and cutaneous toxicity (in seven [14%] patients). There were three treatment-related deaths during the study, two due to sepsis and one due to embolic stroke. Interpretation Our results provide preliminary evidence that the triplet combination of ibrutinib, lenalidomide, and rituximab is an active regimen in patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma, and should be evaluated in a prospective randomised controlled trial.
  • Bolomsky, Arnold; Vogler, Meike; Kose, Murat Cem; Heckman, Caroline A.; Ehx, Gregory; Ludwig, Heinz; Caers, Jo (2020)
    Cell death escape is one of the most prominent features of tumor cells and closely linked to the dysregulation of members of the Bcl-2 family of proteins. Among those, the anti-apoptotic family member myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) acts as a master regulator of apoptosis in various human malignancies. Irrespective of its unfavorable structure profile, independent research efforts recently led to the generation of highly potent MCL-1 inhibitors that are currently evaluated in clinical trials. This offers new perspectives to target a so far undruggable cancer cell dependency. However, a detailed understanding about the tumor and tissue type specific implications of MCL-1 are a prerequisite for the optimal (i.e., precision medicine guided) use of this novel drug class. In this review, we summarize the major functions of MCL-1 with a special focus on cancer, provide insights into its different roles in solid vs. hematological tumors and give an update about the (pre)clinical development program of state-of-the-art MCL-1 targeting compounds. We aim to raise the awareness about the heterogeneous role of MCL-1 as drug target between, but also within tumor entities and to highlight the importance of rationale treatment decisions on a case by case basis.
  • Majumder, Muntasir M.; Leppä, Aino-Maija; Hellesøy, Monica; Dowling, Paul; Malyutina, Alina; Kopperud, Reidun; Bazou, Despina; Andersson, Emma; Parsons, Alun; Tang, Jing; Kallioniemi, Olli; Mustjoki, Satu; O´Gorman, Peter; Wennerberg, Krister; Porkka, Kimmo; Gjertsen, Bjørn T.; Heckman, Caroline A. (2020)
    Innate drug sensitivity in healthy cells aids identification of lineage specific anti-cancer therapies and reveals off-target effects. To characterize the diversity in drug responses in the major hematopoietic cell types, we simultaneously assessed their sensitivity to 71 small molecules utilizing a multi-parametric flow cytometry assay and mapped their proteomic and basal signaling profiles. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified distinct drug responses in healthy cell subsets based on their cellular lineage. Compared to other cell types, CD19+/B and CD56+/NK cells were more sensitive to dexamethasone, venetoclax and midostaurin, while monocytes were more sensitive to trametinib. Venetoclax exhibited dose dependent cell selectivity that inversely correlated to STAT3 phosphorylation. Lineage specific effect of midostaurin was similarly detected in CD19+/B cells from healthy, acute myeloid leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia samples. Comparison of drug responses in healthy and neoplastic cells showed that healthy cell responses are predictive of the corresponding malignant cell response. Taken together, understanding drug sensitivity in the healthy cell-of-origin provides opportunities to obtain a new level of therapy precision and avoid off-target toxicity.
  • Savola, Paula; Martelius, Timi; Kankainen, Matti; Huuhtanen, Jani; Lundgren, Sofie; Koski, Yrjö; Eldfors, Samuli; Kelkka, Tiina; Keränen, Mikko A. I.; Ellonen, Pekka; Kovanen, Panu E.; Kytölä, Soili; Saarela, Janna; Lahdesmaki, Harri; Seppänen, Mikko R. J.; Mustjoki, Satu (2020)
    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and other late-onset immunodeficiencies often co-manifest with autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation. The pathogenesis of most cases is elusive, as only a minor subset harbors known monogenic germline causes. The involvement of both B and T cells is, however, implicated. To study whether somatic mutations in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells associate with immunodeficiency, we recruited 17 patients and 21 healthy controls. Eight patients had late-onset CVID and nine patients other immunodeficiency and/or severe autoimmunity. In total, autoimmunity occurred in 94% and lymphoproliferation in 65%. We performed deep sequencing of 2,533 immune-associated genes from CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. Deep T-cell receptor b-sequencing was used to characterize CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell receptor repertoires. The prevalence of somatic mutations was 65% in all immunodeficiency patients, 75% in CVID, and 48% in controls. Clonal hematopoiesis-associated variants in both CD4(+)and CD8(+) cells occurred in 24% of immunodeficiency patients. Results demonstrated mutations in known tumor suppressors, oncogenes, and genes that are critical for immuneand proliferative functions, such as STAT5B (2 patients), C5AR1 (2 patients), KRAS (one patient), and NOD2 (one patient). Additionally, as a marker of T-cell receptor repertoire perturbation, CVID patients harbored increased frequencies of clones with identical complementarity determining region 3 sequences despite unique nucleotide sequences when compared to controls. In conclusion, somatic mutations in genes implicated for autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation are common in CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells of patients with immunodeficiency. They may contribute to immune dysregulation in a subset of immunodeficiency patients.
  • Kumar, Arun; Chen, Tingting; Kantele, Anu; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Hedman, Klaus; Franssila, Rauli; Pakkanen, Sari Hannele (2011)
    The newly discovered Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) resides in approximately 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC). Causal role of MCPyV for this rare and aggressive skin cancer is suggested by monoclonal integration and truncation of large T (LT) viral antigen in MCC cells. The mutated MCPyV has recently been found in highly purified leukemic cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), suggesting a pathogenic role also in CLL. About 50–80% of adults display MCPyVspecific antibodies. The humoral immunity does not protect against the development of MCC, as neutralizing MCPyV antibodies occur in higher levels among MCC patients than healthy controls. Impaired T-cell immunity has been linked with aggressive MCC behavior. Therefore, cellular immunity appears to be important in MCPyV infection surveillance. In order to elucidate the role of MCPyV-specific Th-cell immunity, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy adults were stimulated with MCPyV VP1 virus-like particles (VLPs), using human bocavirus (HBoV) VLPs and Candida albicans antigen as positive controls. Proliferation, IFN-c, IL-13 and IL-10 responses were examined in 15 MCPyV-seropositive and 15 seronegative volunteers. With the MCPyV antigen, significantly stronger Th-cell responses were found in MCPyVseropositive than MCPyV-seronegative subjects, whereas with the control antigens, the responses were statistically similar. The most readily detectable cytokine was IFN-c. The MCPyV antigen tended to induce stronger IFN-c responses than HBoV VLP antigen. Taken together, MCPyV-specific Th-cells elicit vigorous IFN-c responses. IFN-c being a cytokine with major antiviral and tumor suppressing functions, Th-cells are suggested to be important mediators of MCPyV-specific immune surveillance.