Browsing by Subject "COHORT"

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  • Vakkilainen, Svetlana; Constantini, Alice; Taskinen, Mervi; Wartiovaara-Kautto, Ulla; Mäkitie, Outi (2019)
  • Kuhle, J.; Hardmeier, M.; Disanto, G.; Gugleta, K.; Ecsedi, M.; Lienert, C.; Amato, M. P.; Baum, K.; Buttmann, M.; Bayas, A.; Brassat, D.; Brochet, B.; Confavreux, C.; Edan, G.; Färkkilä, Markus; Fredrikson, S.; Frontoni, M.; D'Hooghe, M.; Hutchinson, M.; De Keyser, J.; Kieseier, B. C.; Kuempfel, T.; Rio, J.; Polman, C.; Roullet, E.; Stolz, C.; Vass, K.; Wandinger, K. P.; Kappos, L.; European Long Term Follow Up Study (2016)
    Objectives: To explore long-term effects of treatment and prognostic relevance of variables assessed at baseline and during the European secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) trial of interferon beta 1b (IFNB-1b). Methods: We assessed 362 patients (60% female; median age 41 years; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS): 5.5; 51% randomized to IFNB-1b) for their EDSS and treatment history after 10 years. Non-parametric analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and multivariate linear regression models were applied. Results: Median EDSS was 6.0 at the end of the randomized controlled trial (RCT), in the IFNB-1b and placebo groups, and 7.0 in long-term follow-up patients (those receiving IFNB-1b in the RCT were 6.5 and those receiving placebo in the RCT were 7.0; p = 0.086). 24 patients (6.6%) were deceased. The EDSS at baseline and the EDSS change during the RCT were the most important predictors of the EDSS 10 years later (partial R-2: 0.47). The ability to predict changes in EDSS 10 years after the RCT was limited (R-2: 0.12). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures remained in the predictive models, but explained <5% of the variability. Conclusions: The results from this analysis did not provide convincing evidence to support a favorable long-term outcome in those patients allocated IFNB-1b during the RCT, in our SPMS cohort. The progressive stage of the disease remains largely unpredictable by clinical and conventional MRI measures, so better prognostic markers are needed.
  • Roininen, Saara; Laine, Outi; Kauppila, Marjut; Vesanen, Marko; Ramet, Maria; Sinisalo, Marjatta; Jantunen, Esa; Saily, Marjaana; Räty, Riikka; Elonen, Erkki; Wartiovaara-Kautto, Ulla (2017)
    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) covers up to a third of all venous thromboses (VTs) detected in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). It usually hampers patients' lives and may also endanger efficient leukemia treatment. Although many factors have been suggested to account for an elevated risk of VTs in patients with ALL, there still is a lack of studies focusing on CVTs and especially in the setting of adult ALL patients. We studied in our retrospective population-based cohort the occurrence, characteristics, as well as risk factors for VTs in 186 consecutively diagnosed Finnish adult ALL patients treated with a national pediatric-inspired treatment protocol ALL2000. In the risk factor analyses for VTs we found a distinction of the characteristics of the patients acquiring CVT from those with other kinds of VTs or without thrombosis. In contrast to previous studies we were also able to compare the effects of asparaginase in relation to CVT occurrence. Notably, more than half of the CVTs were diagnosed prior the administration of asparaginase which accentuates the role of other risk factors on the pathophysiology of CVT compared to truncal or central venous line (CVL) VTs in adult ALL patients.
  • Relas, Heikki; Kosola, Silja (2019)
    ObjectivesAcross diagnosis groups, transition of adolescents and young adults from children's hospitals to adult care associates with decreased treatment adherence and suboptimal treatment results. Our aim was to compare the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients after the transfer of care to the adult clinic and adult patients in the same outpatient clinic.MethodsAll consecutive JIA patients aged 16 to 20years who visited the transition clinic between September 2016 and August 2017 and all consecutive adult onset arthritis patients between December 2016 and August 2017 in the rheumatology outpatient clinic of Helsinki University Hospital were evaluated. HRQoL was measured by a generic instrument, 15D.ResultsA total of 291 patients, 130 JIA, and 161 adults were identified with respective median disease durations of 6.5 and 4.0years. Adults had lower HRQoL measured by 15D (median 0.90 vs. 0.96, P
  • Lavikainen, Piia; Korhonen, Maarit Jaana; Huupponen, Risto; Helin-Salmivaara, Arja (2015)
  • Ojala, K.; Meretoja, T. J.; Leidenius, M. H. K. (2017)
    Background: Recent studies implicate that oncoplastic breast cancer surgery provides better aesthetic outcome than conventional resection. Several factors have been associated with poor aesthetic outcome. This study aims to compare patient-reported aesthetic and functional outcome after conventional and oncoplastic resection and to evaluate prognostic factors for poor aesthetic outcome in a population based setting. Methods: 637 patients having breast conserving treatment (BCT) due to unilateral primary breast cancer at a single hospital district during 2010 were included. Aesthetic and functional outcome were evaluated using two questionnaires three years after surgery. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 379 (59%) patients; 293 (77%) of these had conventional and 86 (23%) oncoplastic resection. Patients in oncoplastic resection group had larger tumour diameter (p <0.001), larger resection specimens (p <0.001), and more often multifocal tumours-(p = 0.032), node positive cancer (p = 0.029) and lower quadrant tumour localization (p = 0.007). Aesthetic outcome according to BCTOS questionnaire was good in 284 (75%) patients; 52 (61%) patients in the oncoplastic group and 230 patients (81%) in the conventional resection group, p <0.001. Larger tumour diameter (p = 0.033), multifocality (p = 0.022), weight of resection specimen ( Conclusions: Patient satisfaction to aesthetic outcome after BCT is high. Conventional resection provides good aesthetic outcome in appropriately selected patients. Oncoplastic resection enables BCT in patients with larger and multifocal tumours with favourable aesthetic outcome. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO similar to The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.
  • Tirkkonen, Joonas; Hellevuo, Heidi; Olkkola, Klaus T.; Hoppu, Sanna (2016)
    Aim: Aetiology of in-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCAs) on general wards has not been studied. We aimed to determine the underlying causes for IHCAs by the means of autopsy records and clinical judgement of the treating consultants. Furthermore, we investigated whether aetiology and preceding vital dysfunctions are associated with long-term survival. Design and setting: Prospective observational study between 2009-2011 including 279 adult IHCA patients attended by medical emergency team in a Finnish university hospital's general wards. Results: The median age of the patients was 72 (64, 80) years, 185 (66%) were male, 178 (64%) of events were monitored/witnessed, first rhythm was shockable in 42 (15%) cases and 53 (19%) patients survived six months. Aetiology was determined as cardiac in 141 events, 73 of which were due to acute myocardial infarction. There were 138 non-cardiac IHCAs; most common causes were pneumonia (39) and exsanguination (16). No statistical difference was observed in the incidence of objective vital dysfunctions preceding the event between the cardiac and non-cardiac groups (40% vs. 44%, p = 0.448). Subjective antecedents were more common in the cardiac cohort (47% vs. 32%, p = 0.022), chest pain being an example (11% vs. 0.7%, p <0.001). Reviewing all 279 IHCAs, only shockable primary rhythm, monitored/witnessed event and low comorbidity score were independently associated with 180-day survival. Conclusions: Cardiac aetiology underlies half of the IHCAs on general wards. Both objective and subjective antecedents are common. However, neither the cardiac aetiology nor the absence of preceding deterioration of vital signs were factors independently associated with a favourable outcome. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Strandberg, Arto Y.; Hoti, Fabian J.; Strandberg, Timo E.; Christopher, Solomon; Haukka, Jari; Korhonen, Pasi (2016)
    Background Insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes may increase mortality and cancer incidence, but the impact of different types of basal insulins on these endpoints is unclear. Compared to the traditional NPH insulin, the newer, longer-acting insulin analogues detemir and glargine have shown benefits in randomized controlled trials. Whether these advantages translate into lower mortality among users in real life is unknown. Objective To estimate the differences in all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates between new users of basal insulins in a population-based study in Finland. Methods 23 751 individuals aged >= 40 with type 2 diabetes, who initiated basal insulin therapy in 2006-2009 were identified from national registers, with comprehensive data for mortality, causes of death, and background variables. Propensity score matching was performed on characteristics. Follow-up time was up to 4 years (median 1.7 years). Results 2078 deaths incurred. With NPH as reference, the adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality were 0.39 (95% CI, 0.30-0.50) for detemir, and 0.55 (95% CI, 0.44-0.69) for glargine. As compared to glargine, the HR was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.54-0.93) among detemir users. Compared to NPH, the mortality risk for both cardiovascular causes as well as cancer were also significantly lower for glargine, and especially for detemir in adjusted analysis. Furthermore, the results were robust in various sensitivity analyses. Conclusion In real clinical practice, mortality was substantially higher among users of NPH insulin as compared to insulins detemir or glargine. Considering the large number of patients who require insulin therapy, this difference in risk may have major clinical and public health implications. Due to limitations of the observational study design, further investigation using an interventional study design is warranted.
  • Piippo, Sonja; Viljanen, Mirva; Savilahti, Erkki; Kuitunen, Mikael (2020)
    Background The association between atopic sensitisation, atopic eczema (AE) and asthma is known, but distinct roles of allergies on long-term health are unestablished. Objective Evaluation of allergic symptoms and sensitisation in adolescents who in infancy had AE and verified cows' milk allergy (CMA) or AE and a negative CMA challenge, and controls. Methods Children with AE, with and without CMA, from a randomised controlled study in 1999-2001 examining the effect of probiotics on AE severity at older than 12 months of age, attended a follow-up visit at age 16 to 18, with age-matched controls. Data came from a questionnaire (ISAAC questionnaire), analysis of serum antigen-specific immunoglobulin Es (IgEs), and clinical evaluation. Group comparisons were carried out (chi(2)tests and logistic regression). Results Fifty-two patients with AE and CMA (AE/CMA+ group), 52 with AE and suspicion of CMA (AE/CMA- group), and 57 controls attended a study visit. IgE-mediated sensitisation was significantly more prevalent in the AE/CMA+ group vs the controls, for horse, cat, dog, egg white and wheat (P <.024 for all). For birch, timothy and mugwort (P <.008 for all), sensitisation was more prevalent in both the AE/CMA+ group and the AE/CMA- group vs controls. On the basis of questionnaire data the AE/CMA + group reported a significantly higher lifetime prevalence of wheezing (64% vs 35% and 32%;P = .001), noninfectious rhinitis (85% vs 62% and 56%;P = .004), and hay fever (77% vs 52% and 33%;P <.001) vs the AE/CMA- group and the control group, respectively. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Patients with AE and CMA in infancy, as opposed to patients with AE only, or controls, report more allergic symptoms and exhibit more allergic sensitisation in adolescence. This indicates that CMA in infancy is an independent risk factor of allergic disease in adolescence.
  • Knight, Anna K.; Craig, Jeffrey M.; Theda, Christiane; Baekvad-Hansen, Marie; Bybjerg-Grauholm, Jonas; Hansen, Christine S.; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Weinsheimer, Shantel M.; Werge, Thomas M.; Brennan, Patricia A.; Cubells, Joseph F.; Newport, D. Jeffrey; Stowe, Zachary N.; Cheong, Jeanie L. Y.; Dalach, Philippa; Doyle, Lex W.; Loke, Yuk J.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Just, Allan C.; Wright, Robert O.; Tellez-Rojo, Mara M.; Svensson, Katherine; Trevisi, Letizia; Kennedy, Elizabeth M.; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Iurato, Stella; Räikkönen, Katri; Lahti, Jari M. T.; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Kajantie, Eero; Villa, Pia M.; Laivuori, Hannele; Hämäläinen, Esa; Park, Hea Jin; Bailey, Lynn B.; Parets, Sasha E.; Kilaru, Varun; Menon, Ramkumar; Horvath, Steve; Bush, Nicole R.; LeWinn, Kaja Z.; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Conneely, Karen N.; Smith, Alicia K. (2016)
    Background: Gestational age is often used as a proxy for developmental maturity by clinicians and researchers alike. DNA methylation has previously been shown to be associated with age and has been used to accurately estimate chronological age in children and adults. In the current study, we examine whether DNA methylation in cord blood can be used to estimate gestational age at birth. Results: We find that gestational age can be accurately estimated from DNA methylation of neonatal cord blood and blood spot samples. We calculate a DNA methylation gestational age using 148 CpG sites selected through elastic net regression in six training datasets. We evaluate predictive accuracy in nine testing datasets and find that the accuracy of the DNA methylation gestational age is consistent with that of gestational age estimates based on established methods, such as ultrasound. We also find that an increased DNA methylation gestational age relative to clinical gestational age is associated with birthweight independent of gestational age, sex, and ancestry. Conclusions: DNA methylation can be used to accurately estimate gestational age at or near birth and may provide additional information relevant to developmental stage. Further studies of this predictor are warranted to determine its utility in clinical settings and for research purposes. When clinical estimates are available this measure may increase accuracy in the testing of hypotheses related to developmental age and other early life circumstances.
  • Wegelius, Asko; Pankakoski, Maiju; Tomppo, Liisa; Lehto, Ulriika; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Suvisaari, Jaana; Paunio, Tiina; Hennah, William (2015)
    Pre- and perinatal environmental factors have been shown to increase schizophrenia risk particularly when combined with genetic liability. The investigation of specific gene environment interactions in the etiology of psychiatric disorders has gained momentum. We used multivariate GEE regression modeling to investigate the interaction between genes of the DISCI pathway and birth weight, in relation to schizophrenia susceptibility in a Finnish schizophrenia family cohort. The study sample consisted of 457 subjects with both genotype and birth weight information. Gender and place of birth were adjusted for in the models. We found a significant interaction between birth weight and two NDE1 markers in relation to increased schizophrenia risk: a four SNP haplotype spanning NDE1 (b = 1.26, SE= 0.5, p = 0.012) and one of its constituent SNPs rs4781678 (b = 1.33, SE = 0.51, p = 0.010). Specifically, high birth weight (> 4000 g) was associated with increased schizophrenia risk among subjects homozygous for the previously identified risk alleles. The study was based on a family study sample with high genetic loading for schizophrenia and thus our findings cannot directly be generalized as representing the general population. Our results suggest that the functions mediated by NDE1 during the early stages of neurodevelopment are susceptible to the additional disruptive effects of pre- and perinatal environmental factors associated with high birth weight, augmenting schizophrenia susceptibility. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • But, Anna; Wang, Haining; Mannisto, Satu; Pukkala, Eero; Haukka, Jari (2014)
  • Jang, Jieun; Cho, Eun-Jung; Hwang, Yunji; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Ahn, Choonghyun; Choi, Jeoungbin; Chang, Soung-Hoon; Shin, Hai-Rim; Lim, Min Kyung; Yoo, Keun-Young; Park, Sue K. (2019)
    Purpose Few studies investigated roles of body mass index (BMI) on gastric cancer (GC) risk according to Helicobacter pylori infection status. This study was conducted to evaluate associations between BMI and GC risk with consideration of H. pylori infection information. Materials and Methods We performed a case-cohort study (n=2,458) that consists of a subcohort (n=2,193 including 67 GC incident cases) randomly selected from the Korean Multicenter Cancer Cohort (KMCC) and 265 incident GC cases outside of the subcohort. H. pylori infection was assessed using an immunoblot assay. GC risk according to BMI was evaluated by calculating hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) using weighted Cox hazard regression model. Results Increased GC risk in lower BMI group (= 25 kg/m(2)) showed non-significantly increased GC risk (HR, 10.82; 95% CI, 1.25 to 93.60 and HR, 11.33; 95% CI, 1.13 to 113.66, respectively). However, these U-shaped associations between BMI and GC risk were not observed in the group who had ever been infected by H. pylori. Conclusion This study suggests the U-shaped associations between BMI and GC risk, especially in subjects who had never been infected by H. pylori.
  • GREAT Global Res Acute Conditions; INI-CRCT Invest Network Initiative; Legrand, Matthieu; Lassus, Johan; Harjola, Veli-Pekka (2018)
    Background The interaction between chronic medications on admission and the association between serum potassium level and outcome in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) are unknown. Methods Observational intercontinental study of patients admitted with AHF. 15954 patients were included from 12 cohorts in 4 continents. Main outcome was 90-day mortality. Clinical presentation (medication use, hemodynamics, comorbidities), demographic, echocardiographic, and biochemical data on admission were recorded prospectively in each cohort, with prospective adjudication of outcomes. Results Positive and negative linear relationships between 90-day mortality and sK+ above 4.5 mmol/L (hyperkalemia) and below 3.5 mmol/L (hypo-kalemia) were observed. Hazard ratio for death was 1.46 [1.34-1.58] for hyperkalemia and 1.22 [1.06-1.40] for hypokalemia. In a fully adjusted model, only hyperkalemia remained associated with mortality (HR 1.03 [1.02-1.04] for each 0.1 mmol/l change of sK+ above 4.5 mmol/L). Interaction tests revealed that the association between hyperkalemia and outcome was significantly affected by chronic medications. The association between hyperkalemia and mortality was absent for patients treated with beta blockers and in those with preserved renal function. Conclusions In patients with AHF, sK+ > 4.5 mmol/L appears to be associated with 90-day mortality. B-blockers have potentially a protective effect in the setting of hyperkalemia.
  • Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Paju, Susanna; Koponen, Jaana; Viikari, Jorma; Taittonen, Leena; Laitinen, Tomi; Burgner, David; Kähönen, Mika; Hutri-Kähönen, Niina; Raitakari, Olli; Juonala, Markus (2019)
    IMPORTANCE Severe forms of common chronic oral infections or inflammations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk in adults. To date, the role of childhood oral infections in cardiovascular risk is not known because no long-term studies have been conducted. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether signs of oral infections in childhood are associated with cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The cohort study (n = 755) was derived from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, an ongoing prospective cohort study in Finland initiated in 1980. Participants underwent clinical oral examinations during childhood, when they were aged 6, 9, or 12 years and a clinical cardiovascular follow-up in adulthood in 2001 at age 27, 30, or 33 years and/or in 2007 at age 33, 36, or 39 years. Cardiovascular risk factors were measured at baseline and during the follow-up until the end of 2007. Final statistical analyses were completed on February 19, 2019. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Four signs of oral infections (bleeding on probing, periodontal probing pocket depth, caries, and dental fillings) were documented. Cumulative lifetime exposure to 6 cardiovascular risk factors was calculated from dichotomized variables obtained by using the area-under-the-curve method. Subclinical atherosclerosis (ie, carotid artery intima-media thickness [IMT]) was quantified in 2001 (n = 468) and 2007 (n = 489). RESULTS This study included 755 participants, of whom 371 (49.1%) were male; the mean (SD) age at baseline examination was 8.07 (2.00) years. In this cohort, 33 children (4.5%) had no sign of oral infections, whereas 41 (5.6%) had 1 sign, 127 (17.4%) had 2 signs, 278 (38.3%) had 3 signs, and 248 (34.1%) had 4 signs. The cumulative exposure to risk factors increased with the increasing number of oral infections both in childhood and adulthood. In multiple linear regression models, childhood oral infections, including signs of either periodontal disease (R-2 = 0.018; P = .01), caries (R-2 = 0.022; P = .008), or both (R-2 = 0.024; P = .004), were associated with adulthood IMT. The presence of any sign of oral infection in childhood was associated with increased IMT (third tertile vs tertiles 1 and 2) with a relative risk of 1.87 (95% CI, 1.25-2.79), whereas the presence of all 4 signs produced a relative risk of 1.95 (95% CI, 1.28-3.00). The associations were more obvious in boys: if periodontal disease were present, the corresponding estimate was 1.69 (95% CI, 1.21-2.36); if caries, 1.46 (95% CI, 1.04-20.05); and if all 4 signs of oral infections, 2.25 (95% CI, 1.30-3.89). The associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Oral infections in childhood appear to be associated with the subclinical carotid atherosclerosis seen in adulthood.
  • Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Cuthbertson, David; Couluris, Marisa; Knip, Mikael; Virtanen, Suvi M. (2020)
    Aims/hypothesis This paper presents the relationship between islet autoantibodies, precursors of type 1 diabetes, and the development of persistent asthma, allergic rhinitis and atopic eczema. Methods A total of 2159 newborns who had a first-degree relative with type 1 diabetes and selected HLA genotypes were followed until the youngest participant reached 10 years of age. Islet cell antibodies (ICA) were detected using indirect immunofluorescence. Autoantibodies to insulin (IAA), GAD (GADA), the tyrosine phosphatase-related insulinoma-associated 2 molecule (IA-2A) and zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8A) were quantified with the use of specific radiobinding assays. As an ancillary study, the incidence of asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema was assessed in 1106 of these children using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) core questionnaire when the children were 9-11 years old. HRs with 95% CIs were calculated to depict the incidence of these diseases following seroconversion to autoantibody positivity. Results The cumulative incidence of atopic eczema, allergic rhinitis and persistent asthma were 22%, 9% and 7.5%, respectively, by 9-11 years of age. The occurrence of diabetes-related autoantibodies showed a protective association with subsequently reported incidence of asthma and eczema. The incidence of rhinitis was not significantly related to the occurrence of IAA or GADA (statistical power was limited), but demonstrated the same inverse relationship as did the other diseases with ICA or when multiple autoantibodies first appeared together. Conclusions/interpretation The findings add evidence to the relationships between these atopic diseases and diabetes-related autoimmunity and also suggest that, for eczema, the interaction depends upon which autoantibody appeared first.
  • Griffiths, Amanda; Kouvonen, Anne; Pentti, Jaana; Oksanen, Tuula; Virtanen, Marianna; Salo, Paula; Vaananen, Ari; Kivimaki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi (2014)
  • Araneda, David; Korhonen, Tellervo; Laatikainen, Tiina; Haukkala, Ari; Rose, Richard; Kaprio, Jaakko (2020)
    Aims:Swedish smokeless tobacco (snus) is a lower-risk tobacco product than cigarette smoking for individuals. However, the public health impact of snus use is less well studied. Critically, it is uncertain whether use of snus leads to the onset of smoking. This study aimed to investigate prospectively the association between snus experimentation in late adolescence and daily cigarette smoking in early adulthood among Finnish young men.Methods:Data were obtained from 1090 young men within the population-based FinnTwin12 cohort. At baseline (mean age 17 years), we assessed lifetime use of cigarettes and snus, plus other potential predictors of cigarette smoking. At follow-up (mean age 24 years), participants were categorized according to their current smoking status. The final analyses were conducted among 375 young men who were never smokers at baseline with adequate data on follow-up smoking status and other potential predictors of cigarette smoking.Results:Age-adjusted logistic regressions showed an increased risk of becoming a daily smoker at follow-up among those participants who had at least tried snus but had never smoked cigarettes at baseline (odds ratio (OR) 6.48, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.02-20.7), compared with those who had never used snus. When additionally adjusted for monthly alcohol intoxication, maternal smoking, and peer drug use, the association between snus experimentation and later daily cigarette smoking was attenuated, but remained significant (OR 3.94, 95% CI 1.22-12.7).Conclusions:Our data support the proposition that snus experimentation during late adolescence is longitudinally associated with daily cigarette smoking in early adulthood. Although a causal association cannot be inferred with certainty, snus experimentation might constitute an indicator of the propensity to proceed to regular snus use and initiation of use of other tobacco or nicotine products.
  • Girchenko, Polina; Lahti, Jari; Czamara, Darina; Knight, Anna K.; Jones, Meaghan J.; Suarez Figueiredo, Anna; Hämäläinen, Esa; Kajantie, Eero; Laivuori, Hannele; Villa, Pia M.; Reynolds, Rebecca M.; Kobor, Michael S.; Smith, Alicia K.; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Räikkönen, Katri (2017)
    Background: A recent study has shown that it is possible to accurately estimate gestational age (GA) at birth from the DNA methylation (DNAm) of fetal umbilical cord blood/newborn blood spots. This DNAm GA predictor may provide additional information relevant to developmental stage. In 814 mother-neonate pairs, we evaluated the associations between DNAm GA and a number of maternal and offspring characteristics. These characteristics reflect prenatal environmental adversity and are expected to influence newborn developmental stage. Results: DNAm GA acceleration (GAA; i.e., older DNAm GA than chronological GA) of the offspring at birth was associated with maternal age of over 40 years at delivery, pre-eclampsia and fetal demise in a previous pregnancy, maternal pre-eclampsia and treatment with antenatal betamethasone in the index pregnancy, lower neonatal birth size, lower 1-min Apgar score, and female sex. DNAm GA deceleration (GAD; i.e., younger DNAm GA than chronological GA) of the offspring at birth was associated with insulin-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a previous pregnancy and Sjogren's syndrome. These findings were more accentuated when the DNAm GA calculation was based on the raw difference between DNAm GA and GA than on the residual from the linear regression of DNAm GA on GA. Conclusions: Our findings show that variations in the DNAm GA of the offspring at birth are associated with a number of maternal and offspring characteristics known to reflect exposure to prenatal environmental adversity. Future studies should be aimed at determining if this biological variation is predictive of developmental adversity.
  • Mardones, Francisco; Arnaiz, Pilar; Pacheco, Paz; Dominguez, Angelica; Villarroel, Luis; Eriksson, Johan G.; Barja, Salesa; Farias, Marcelo; Castillo, Oscar (2014)