Browsing by Subject "COLLABORATIVE CARE"

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  • Raevuori, Anu; Vahlberg, Tero; Korhonen, Tellervo; Hilgert, Outi; Aittakumpu-Hyden, Raija; Forman-Hoffman, Valerie (2021)
    Background: Meru Health Program (MHP) is a therapist-guided, 8-week intervention for depression delivered via smartphone. The aim was to test its efficacy in patients with clinical depression in a Finnish university student health service.& nbsp; Methods: Patients (n=124, women 72.6%, mean age 25y) were stratified based on antidepressant status, and randomized into intervention group receiving MHP plus treatment as usual (TAU), and control group receiving TAU only. Depression, measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scale, was the primary outcome. After baseline (T0), follow-ups were at mid-intervention (T4), immediately post-intervention (T8); 3 months (T20), and 6 months (T32) post-intervention.& nbsp; Results: The intervention group and control group did not have significant differences in depression outcomes throughout end of treatment and follow-up. Among secondary outcomes, increase in resilience (d=0.32, p=0.03) and mindfulness (d=0.57, p=0.002), and reduction in perceived stress (d=-0.52, p=0.008) were greater in MHP+TAU versus TAU at T32; no differences were found in anxiety, sleep disturbances, and quality of life between groups. Post-hoc comparisons of patients on antidepressants showed significantly greater reduction in depression at T32 for MHP+TAU versus TAU (d=-0.73, p=0.01); patients not on antidepressants showed no between-group differences.& nbsp; Limitations: Limitations include unknown characteristics of TAU, potential bias from patients and providers not being blinded to treatment group, and failure to specify examination of differences by antidepressant status in the protocol.& nbsp; & nbsp;Conclusions: Most outcomes, including depression, did not significantly differ between MHP+TAU and TAU. Exploratory analysis revealed intervention effect at the end of the 6-month follow-up among patients on anti-depressant medication.
  • Vuorilehto, Maria S.; Melartin, Tarja K.; Riihimaki, Kirsi; Isometsa, Erkki T. (2016)
    Background: Primary health care bears the main responsibility for treating depression in most countries. However, few studies have comprehensively investigated provision of pharmacological and psychosocial treatments, their continuity, or patient attitudes and adherence to treatment in primary care. Methods: In the Vantaa Primary Care Depression Study, 1111 consecutive primary care patients in the City of Vantaa, Finland, were screened for depression with Prime-MD, and 137 were diagnosed with DSM-IV depressive disorders via SCID-I/P and SCID-Il interviews. The 100 patients with current major depressive disorder (MDD) or partly remitted MDD at baseline were prospectively followed up to 18 months, and their treatment contacts and the treatments provided were longitudinally followed. Results: The median number of patients' visits to a general practitioner during the follow-up was five; of those due to depression two. Antidepressant treatment was offered to 82% of patients, but only 50% commenced treatment and adhered to it adequately. Psychosocial support was offered to 49%, but only 29% adhered to the highly variable interventions. Attributed reasons for poor adherence varied, including negative attitude, side effects, practical obstacles, or no perceived need. About one-quarter (23%) of patients were referred to specialized care at some time-point. Limitations: Moderate sample size. Data collected in 2002-2004. Conclusions: The majority of depressive patients in primary health care had been offered pharmacotherapy, psychotherapeutic support, or both. However, effectiveness of these efforts may have been limited by lack of systematic follow-up and poor adherence to both pharmacotherapy and psychosocial treatment. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.