Browsing by Subject "COLON-CANCER"

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  • Nummela, Pirjo; Heiskanen, Annamari; Kytölä, Soili; Haglund, Caj; Lepistö, Anna; Satomaa, Tero; Ristimäki, Ari (2021)
    Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a highly mucinous adenocarcinoma growing in the peritoneal cavity and most commonly originating from the appendix. Glycans play an important role in carcinogenesis, and glycosylation is altered in malignant diseases, including PMP. We have previously demonstrated that fucosylation of N-glycans is increased in PMP, but we did not observe modulation of overall sialylation. As sialic acids can be attached to the rest of the glycan via α2,3- or α2,6-linkage, we have now analyzed the linkage patterns of sialic acids in tissue specimens of normal appendices, low-grade appendiceal mucinous neoplasms (LAMN), low-grade (LG) PMP and high-grade (HG) PMP. For the linkage analysis, the enzymatically released acidic N-glycans were first treated with ethyl esterification or α2,3-sialidase digestion followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Significant increase in the relative abundance of α2,6-sialylated and decrease in α2,3-sialylated N-glycans was observed in PMP tumors as compared to the normal appendices (P \lt; 0.025). More specifically, increased α2,6-sialylation (P \lt; 0.05) and decreased α2,3-sialylation (P \lt; 0.01) were detected in afucosylated and monofucosylated N-glycans of PMPs, whereas the less abundant multifucosylated glycans, containing terminal fucose, demonstrated increased α2,3-sialylation (P \lt; 0.01). Importantly, the increase in α2,6-sialylation was also detected between PMP and the appendiceal precursor lesion LAMN (P \lt; 0.01). The identified glycosylation alterations produce ligands for sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) and sialofucosylated glycans binding selectins, which play a role in the peritoneal dissemination and progression of the disease.
  • Onali, Tuulia; Kivimäki, Anne; Mauramo, Matti; Salo, Tuula; Korpela, Riitta (2021)
    Wild berries are part of traditional Nordic diets and are a rich source of phytochemicals, such as polyphenols. Various berry treatments have shown to interfere with cancer progression in vitro and in vivo. Here, we systematically reviewed the anticancer effects of two Nordic wild berries of the Vaccinium genus, lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), on digestive tract cancers. The review was conducted according to the PRISMA 2020 guidelines. Searches included four databases: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and CAB abstracts. Publications not written in English, case-reports, reviews, and conference abstracts were excluded. Moreover, studies with only indirect markers of cancer risk or studies with single compounds not derived from lingonberry or bilberry were not included. Meta-analysis was not performed. The majority (21/26) of studies investigated bilberry and colorectal cancer. Experimental studies on colorectal cancer indicated that bilberry inhibited intestinal tumor formation and cancer cell growth. One uncontrolled pilot human study supported the inhibitory potential of bilberry on colorectal cancer cell proliferation. Data from all 10 lingonberry studies suggests potent inhibition of cancer cell growth and tumor formation. In conclusion, in vitro and animal models support the antiproliferative and antitumor effects of various bilberry and lingonberry preparations on digestive tract cancers.
  • Mauramo, Matti; Onali, Tuulia; Wahbi, Wafa; Vasara, Jenni; Lampinen, Anniina; Mauramo, Elina; Kivimäki, Anne; Martens, Stefan; Häggman, Hely; Sutinen, Meeri; Salo, Tuula (2021)
    Previous studies indicate that bilberry with high amounts of phenolic compounds can inhibit carcinogenic processes of colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo. However, no studies have focused on the effects of bilberry on oral cancer. In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of bilberry powder on oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells using both in vitro and in vivo assays. The effects of 0, 1, 10, and 25 mg/mL of whole bilberry powder on the viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion of OSCC (HSC-3) cells were examined and compared with 0.01 mg/mL of cetuximab. Two oral keratinocyte cell lines served as controls. Tumor area was analyzed in zebrafish microinjected with HSC-3 cells and treated with 2.5, 10, or 25 mu g/mL of bilberry powder. Metastases in the head or tail areas were counted. Bilberry powder inhibited the viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion of HSC-3 cells (p < 0.05), which was more pronounced with higher concentrations. Cetuximab had no effect on HSC-3 cell migration or invasion. Compared to controls, the tumor area in zebrafish treated with bilberry powder (10 and 25 mu g/mL) was reduced significantly (p = 0.038 and p = 0.021, respectively), but the number of fish with metastases did not differ between groups. Based on our in vitro and in vivo experiments, we conclude that whole bilberry powder has anti-tumor effects on OSCC cells.
  • Li, Xiaolei; Wu, Zhiqiang; An, Xiaojing; Mei, Qian; Bai, Miaomiao; Hanski, Leena; Li, Xiang; Ahola, Tero; Han, Weidong (2017)
    Acquired therapeutic resistance by tumors is a substantial impediment to reducing the morbidity and mortality that are attributable to human malignancies. The mechanisms responsible for the dramatic shift between chemosensitivity and chemoresistance in colorectal carcinoma have not been defined. Here, we report that LRP16 selectively interacts and activates double-stranded RNA-dependent kinase (PKR), and also acts as scaffolds to assist the formation of a ternary complex of PKR and IKK beta, prolonging the polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR)-dependent nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) transactivation caused by DNA-damaging agents and confers acquired chemoresistance. We also identified a small molecule, MRS2578, which strikingly abrogated the binding of LRP16 to PKR and IKK beta, converting LRP16 into a death molecule and forestalling colon tumorigenesis. Inclusion of MRS2578 with etoposide, versus each drug alone, exhibited synergistic antitumor cytotoxicity in xenografts. Our combinatorial approach introduces a strategy to enhance the efficacy of genotoxicity therapies for the treatment of tumors.
  • Pekkala, Satu; Keskitalo, Anniina; Kettunen, Emilia; Lensu, Sanna; Nykänen, Noora; Kuopio, Teijo; Ritvos, Olli; Hentilä, Jaakko; Nissinen, Tuuli A.; Hulmi, Juha J. (2019)
    Colorectal cancer (CRC) and cachexia are associated with the gut microbiota and microbial surface molecules. We characterized the CRC-associated microbiota and investigated whether cachexia affects the microbiota composition. Further, we examined the possible relationship between the microbial surface molecule flagellin and CRC. CRC cells (C26) were inoculated into mice. Activin receptor (ACVR) ligands were blocked, either before tumor formation or before and after, to increase muscle mass and prevent muscle loss. The effects of flagellin on C26-cells were studied in vitro. The occurrence of similar phenomena were studied in murine and human tumors. Cancer modulated the gut microbiota without consistent effects of blocking the ACVR ligands. However, continued treatment for muscle loss modified the association between microbiota and weight loss. Several abundant microbial taxa in cancer were flagellated. Exposure of C26-cells to flagellin increased IL6 and CCL2/MCP-1 mRNA and IL6 excretion. Murine C26 tumors expressed more IL6 and CCL2/MCP-1 mRNA than C26-cells, and human CRC tumors expressed more CCL2/MCP-1 than healthy colon sites. Additionally, flagellin decreased caspase-1 activity and the production of reactive oxygen species, and increased cytotoxicity in C26-cells. Conditioned media from flagellin-treated C26-cells deteriorated C2C12-myotubes and decreased their number. In conclusion, cancer increased flagellated microbes that may promote CRC survival and cachexia by inducing inflammatory proteins such as MCP-1. Cancer-associated gut microbiota could not be rescued by blocking ACVR ligands.
  • Slik, Khadija; Turkki, Riku; Carpen, Olli; Kurki, Samu; Korkeila, Eija; Sundström, Jari; Pellinen, Teijo (2019)
    Current risk factors in stage II colorectal carcinoma are insufficient to guide treatment decisions. Loss of CDX2 has been shown to associate with poor clinical outcome and predict benefit for adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III colorectal carcinoma. The prognostic relevance of CDX2 in stage II disease has not been sufficiently validated, especially in relation to clinical risk factors, such as microsatellite instability (MSI) status, BRAF mutation status, and tumor budding. In this study, we evaluated the protein expression of CDX2 in tumor center and front areas in a tissue microarrays material of stage II colorectal carcinoma patients (n=232). CDX2 expression showed a partial or total loss in respective areas in 8.6% and 10.9% of patient cases. Patients with loss of CDX2 had shorter disease-specific survival when scored independently either in tumor center or tumor front areas (log rank P=0.012; P=0.012). Loss of CDX2 predicted survival independently of other stage II risk factors, such as MSI status and BRAF mutation status, pT class, and tumor budding (hazard ratio=5.96, 95% confidence interval=1.55-22.95; hazard ratio=3.70, 95% confidence interval=1.30-10.56). Importantly, CDX2 loss predicted inferior survival only in patients with microsatellite stable, but not with MSI-high phenotype. Interestingly, CDX2 loss associated with low E-cadherin expression, tight junction disruption, and high expression of ezrin protein. The work demonstrates that loss of CDX2 is an independent risk factor of poor disease-specific survival in stage II colorectal carcinoma. Furthermore, the study suggests that CDX2 loss is linked with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition independently of tumor budding.
  • Sveen, Anita; Bruun, Jarle; Eide, Peter W.; Eilertsen, Ina A.; Ramirez, Lorena; Murumägi, Astrid; Arjama, Mariliina; Danielsen, Stine A.; Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Elez, Elena; Tabernero, Josep; Guinney, Justin; Palmer, Hector G.; Nesbakken, Arild; Kallioniemi, Olli; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Lothe, Ragnhild A. (2018)
    Purpose: Response to standard oncologic treatment is limited in colorectal cancer. The gene expression-based consensus molecular subtypes (CMS) provide a new paradigm for stratified treatment and drug repurposing; however, drug discovery is currently limited by the lack of translation of CMS to preclinical models. Experimental Design: We analyzed CMS in primary colorectal cancers, cell lines, and patient-derived xenografts (PDX). For classification of preclinical models, we developed an optimized classifier enriched for cancer cell-intrinsic gene expression signals, and performed high-throughput in vitro drug screening (n = 459 drugs) to analyze subtype-specific drug sensitivities. Results: The distinct molecular and clinicopathologic characteristics of each CMS group were validated in a single-hospital series of 409 primary colorectal cancers. The new, cancer cell-adapted classifier was found to perform well in primary tumors, and applied to a panel of 148 cell lines and 32 PDXs, these colorectal cancer models were shown to recapitulate the biology of the CMS groups. Drug screening of 33 cell lines demonstrated subtype-dependent response profiles, confirming strong response to EGFR and HER2 inhibitors in the CMS2 epithelial/canonical group, and revealing strong sensitivity to HSP90 inhibitors in cells with the CMS1 microsatellite instability/immune and CMS4 mesenchymal phenotypes. This association was validated in vitro in additional CMS-predicted cell lines. Combination treatment with 5-fluorouracil and luminespib showed potential to alleviate chemoresistance in a CMS4 PDX model, an effect not seen in a chemosensitive CMS2 PDX model. Conclusions: We provide translation of CMS classification to preclinical models and uncover a potential for targeted treatment repurposing in the chemoresistant CMS4 group. (C) 2017 AACR.
  • Holm, Matilda; Saraswat, Mayank; Joenväärä, Sakari; Ristimäki, Ari; Haglund, Caj; Renkonen, Risto (2018)
    Over 1.4 million people are diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) each year, making it the third most common cancer in the world. Increased screening and therapeutic modalities including improved combination treatments have reduced CRC mortality, although incidence and mortality rates are still increasing in some areas. Serum-based biomarkers are mainly used for follow-up of cancer, and are ideal due to the ease and minimally invasive nature of sample collection. Unfortunately, CEA and other serum markers have too low sensitivity for screening and preoperative diagnostic purposes. Increasing interest is focused on the possible use of biomarkers for predicting treatment response and prognosis in cancer. In this study, we have performed mass spectrometry analysis (UPLC-UDMSE) of serum samples from 19 CRC patients. Increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), which occur during local inflammation and the presence of a systemic inflammatory response, have been linked to poor prognosis in CRC patients. We chose to analyze samples according to CRP values by dividing them into the categories CRP 30, and, separately, according to short and long 5-year survival. The aim was to discover differentially expressed proteins associated with poor prognosis and shorter survival. We quantified 256 proteins and performed detailed statistical analyses and pathway analysis. We discovered multiple proteins that are up- or downregulated in patients with CRP >30 as compared to CRP
  • Chornokur, Ganna; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Lawrenson, Kate; Dennis, Joe; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Qu, Xiaotao; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Jim, Heather S. L.; Chen, Zhihua; Chen, Ann Y.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Aben, Katja K. H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bruinsma, Fiona; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie T.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bunker, Clareann H.; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; du Bois, Andreas; Despierre, Evelyn; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dork, Thilo; Durst, Matthias; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana M.; Edwards, Robert P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Georgia Chenevix-Trench AOCS Ma (2015)
    Background Defective cellular transport processes can lead to aberrant accumulation of trace elements, iron, small molecules and hormones in the cell, which in turn may promote the formation of reactive oxygen species, promoting DNA damage and aberrant expression of key regulatory cancer genes. As DNA damage and uncontrolled proliferation are hallmarks of cancer, including epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), we hypothesized that inherited variation in the cellular transport genes contributes to EOC risk. Methods In total, DNA samples were obtained from 14,525 case subjects with invasive EOC and from 23,447 controls from 43 sites in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). Two hundred seventy nine SNPs, representing 131 genes, were genotyped using an Illumina Infinium iSelect BeadChip as part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNP analyses were conducted using unconditional logistic regression under a log-additive model, and the FDR q Results The most significant evidence of an association for all invasive cancers combined and for the serous subtype was observed for SNP rs17216603 in the iron transporter gene HEPH (invasive: OR = 0.85, P = 0.00026; serous: OR = 0.81, P = 0.00020); this SNP was also associated with the borderline/low malignant potential (LMP) tumors (P = 0.021). Other genes significantly associated with EOC histological subtypes (p Conclusion These results, generated on a large cohort of women, revealed associations between inherited cellular transport gene variants and risk of EOC histologic subtypes.
  • Kondelin, Johanna; Gylfe, Alexandra E.; Lundgren, Sofie; Tanskanen, Tomas; Hamberg, Jiri; Aavikko, Mervi; Palin, Kimmo; Ristolainen, Heikki; Katainen, Riku; Kaasinen, Eevi; Taipale, Minna; Taipale, Jussi; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Jarvinen, Heikki; Bohm, Jan; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Vahteristo, Pia; Tuupanen, Sari; Aaltonen, Lauri A.; Pitkanen, Esa (2017)
    Approximately 15% of colorectal cancers exhibit microsatellite instability (MSI), which leads to accumulation of large numbers of small insertions and deletions (indels). Genes that provide growth advantage to cells via loss-of-function mutations in micro-satellites are called MSI target genes. Several criteria to define these genes have been suggested, one of them being simple mutation frequency. Microsatellite mutation rate, however, depends on the length and nucleotide context of the microsatellite. Therefore, assessing the general impact of mismatch repair deficiency on the likelihood of mutation events is paramount when following this approach. To identify MSI target genes, we developed a statistical model for the somatic background indel mutation rate of microsatellites to assess mutation significance. Exome sequencing data of 24 MSI colorectal cancers revealed indels at 54 million mononucleotide microsatellites of three or more nucleotides in length. The top 105 microsatellites from 71 genes were further analyzed in 93 additional MSI colorectal cancers. Mutation significance and estimated clonality of mutations determined the most likely MSI target genes to be the aminoadipate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase AASDH and the solute transporter SLC9A8. Our findings offer a systematic profiling of the somatic background mutation rate in protein-coding mononucleotide microsatellites, allowing a full cataloging of the true targets of MSI in colorectal cancer. (C) 2017 AACR.
  • Koskensalo, Selja; Louhimo, Johanna; Hagström, Jaana; Lundin, Mikael; Stenman, Ulf Håkan; Haglund, Caj (2013)
  • Silk, Khadija; Kurki, Samu; Korpela, Taina; Carpen, Olli; Korkeila, Eija; Sundstrom, Jari (2017)
    Currently used factors predicting disease recurrence in stage II colorectal cancer patients are not optimal for risk stratification. Thus, new biomarkers are needed. In this study the applicability of ezrin protein expression together with MSI status and BRAF mutation status were tested in predicting disease outcome in stage II colorectal cancer. The study population consisted of 173 stage II colorectal cancer patients. Paraffin-embedded cancer tissue material from surgical specimens was used to construct tissue microarrays (TMAs) with next-generation technique. The TMA-slides were subjected to following immunohistochemical stainings: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, ezrin and anti-BRAF V600E antibody. The staining results were correlated with clinicopathological variables and survival. In categorical analysis, high ezrin protein expression correlated with poor disease-specific survival (p = 0.038). In univariate analysis patients having microsatellite instabile / low ezrin expression tumors had a significantly longer disease-specific survival than patients having microsatellite stable / high ezrin expression tumors (p = 0.007). In multivariate survival analysis, the presence of BRAF mutation was associated to poor overall survival (p = 0.028, HR 3.29, 95% CI1.14-9.54). High ezrin protein expression in patients with microsatellite stable tumors was linked to poor disease-specific survival (p = 0.01, HR 5.68, 95% CI 1.53-21.12). Ezrin protein expression is a promising biomarker in estimating the outcome of stage II colorectal cancer patients. When combined with microsatellite status its ability in predicting disease outcome is further improved.
  • O'Keefe, Stephen J. D.; Li, Jia V.; Lahti, Leo; Ou, Junhai; Carbonero, Franck; Mohammed, Khaled; Posma, Joram M.; Kinross, James; Wahl, Elaine; Ruder, Elizabeth; Vipperla, Kishore; Naidoo, Vasudevan; Mtshali, Lungile; Tims, Sebastian; Puylaert, Philippe G. B.; DeLany, James; Krasinskas, Alyssa; Benefiel, Ann C.; Kaseb, Hatem O.; Newton, Keith; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; de Vos, Willem M.; Gaskins, H. Rex; Zoetendal, Erwin G. (2015)
    Rates of colon cancer are much higher in African Americans (65: 100,000) than in rural South Africans (
  • Vierthaler, Marlene; Rodrigues, Priscila Campioni; Sundquist, Elias; Siponen, Maria; Salo, Tuula; Risteli, Maija (2020)
    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC), the most common cancer in the oral cavity, is aggressive and its incidence is increasing globally. Human host defense cationic antimicrobial peptide-18/antimicrobial peptide leucine-leucine-37 (hCAP18/LL-37) plays a complex role in various types of cancers. In the present study, we characterized the effects of exogenous LL-37 on three OTSCC cell lines and determined the expression of hCAP18/LL-37 in oral dysplastic and OTSCC patient samples. Our data revealed that LL-37, especially in high doses, mostly reduced the proliferation of OTSCC cells, but the effect was fluctuating. However, LL-37 stimulated the migration and invasion of OTSCC cells. The high dose of LL-37 also increased the amount of total epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) probably due to stabilization of the receptor to the plasma membrane. However, activation of EGFR downstream pathways was mostly decreased. Our immunohistochemical analysis showed that the hCAP18/LL-37 expression was higher in normal/mild dysplasia than in moderate/severe dysplasia and OTSCC. The hCAP18/LL-37 expression did not correlate with clinicopathological features or outcome of OTSCC patients. Our data suggest that LL-37 has a fluctuating effect on proliferation, migration and invasion of OTSCC cells, but it does not seem to play a role in the progression of OTSCC.
  • Tanskanen, Tomas; van den Berg, Linda; Valimaki, Niko; Aavikko, Mervi; Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Hveem, Kristian; Wettergren, Yvonne; Lindskog, Elinor Bexe; Tonisson, Neeme; Metspalu, Andres; Silander, Kaisa; Orlando, Giulia; Law, Philip J.; Tuupanen, Sari; Gylfe, Alexandra E.; Hanninen, Ulrika A.; Cajuso, Tatiana; Kondelin, Johanna; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Pukkala, Eero; Jousilahti, Pekka; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Palotie, Aarno; Jarvinen, Heikki; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Lepisto, Anna; Bohm, Jan; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Al-Tassan, Nada A.; Palles, Claire; Martin, Lynn; Barclay, Ella; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M.; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Meyer, Brian F.; Wakil, Salma M.; Campbell, Harry; Smith, Christopher G.; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Maughan, Tim S.; Kaplan, Richard; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Win, Aung K.; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark A.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Casey, Graham; Cheadle, Jeremy P.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Houlston, Richard S.; Palin, Kimmo; Aaltonen, Lauri A. (2018)
    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in elucidating the genetic basis of colorectal cancer (CRC), but there remains unexplained variability in genetic risk. To identify new risk variants and to confirm reported associations, we conducted a genome-wide association study in 1,701 CRC cases and 14,082 cancer-free controls from the Finnish population. A total of 9,068,015 genetic variants were imputed and tested, and 30 promising variants were studied in additional 11,647 cases and 12,356 controls of European ancestry. The previously reported association between the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs992157 (2q35) and CRC was independently replicated (p=2.08 x 10(-4); OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.06-1.23), and it was genome-wide significant in combined analysis (p=1.50 x 10(-9); OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.08-1.16). Variants at 2q35, 6p21.2, 8q23.3, 8q24.21, 10q22.3, 10q24.2, 11q13.4, 11q23.1, 14q22.2, 15q13.3, 18q21.1, 20p12.3 and 20q13.33 were associated with CRC in the Finnish population (false discovery rate
  • Nieminen, Taina T.; O'Donohue, Marie-Francoise; Wu, Yunpeng; Lohi, Hannes; Scherer, Stephen W.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Ellonen, Pekka; Abdel-Rahman, Wael M.; Valo, Satu; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Jarvinen, Heikki J.; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Peltomaki, Paivi (2014)
  • Shen, Zhanlong; Wang, Bo; Luo, Jianyuan; Jiang, Kewei; Zhang, Hui; Mustonen, Harri; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Zhu, Jun; Ye, Yingjiang; Wang, Shan (2016)
    Lysine acetylated modification was indicated to impact colorectal cancer (CRC)'s distant metastasis. However, the global acetylated proteins in CRC and the differential expressed acetylated proteins and acetylated sites between CRC primary and distant metastatic tumor remains unclear. Our aim was to construct a complete atlas of acetylome in CRC and paired liver metastases. Combining high affinity enrichment of acetylated peptides with high sensitive mass spectrometry, we identified 603 acetylation sites from 316 proteins, among which 462 acetylation sites corresponding to 243 proteins were quantified. We further classified them into groups according to cell component, molecular function and biological process and analyzed the metabolic pathways, domain structures and protein interaction networks. Finally, we evaluated the differentially expressed lysine acetylation sites and revealed that 31 acetylated sites of 22 proteins were downregulated in CRC liver metastases compared to that in primary CRC while 40 acetylated sites of 32 proteins were upregulated, of which HIST2H3AK19Ac and H2BLK121Ac were the acetylated histones most changed, while TPM2 K152Ac and ADH1B K331Ac were the acetylated non-histones most altered. These results provide an expanded understanding of acetylome in CRC and its distant metastasis, and might prove applicable in the molecular targeted therapy of metastatic CRC. Biological significance: This study described provides, for the first time, that full-scale profiling of lysine acetylated proteins were identified and quantified in colorectal cancer (CRC) and paired liver metastases. The novelty of the study is that we constructed a complete atlas of acetylome in CRC and paired liver metastases. Moreover, we analyzed these differentially expressed acetylated proteins in cell component, molecular function and biological process. In addition, metabolic pathways, domain structures and protein interaction networks of acetylated proteins were also investigated. Our approaches shows that of the differentially expressed proteins, HIST2H3AK19Ac and H2BLK121Ac were the acetylated histones most changed, while TPM2 K152Ac and ADH1B K331Ac were the acetylated non-histones most altered. Our findings provide an expanded understanding of acetylome in CRC and its distant metastasis, and might prove applicable in the molecular targeted therapy of metastatic CRC. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Gaber, Alexander; Nodin, Bjorn; Hotakainen, Kristiina; Nilsson, Elise; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Bjartell, Anders; Birgisson, Helgi; Jirstrom, Karin (2010)
  • Rantala, Juha K.; Edgren, Henrik; Lehtinen, Laura; Wolf, Maija; Kleivi, Kristine; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Aaltola, Anna-Riina; Laasola, Petra; Kilpinen, Sami; Saviranta, Petri; Iljin, Kristiina; Kallioniemi, Olli (2010)
    Aneuploidy is among the most obvious differences between normal and cancer cells. However, mechanisms contributing to development and maintenance of aneuploid cell growth are diverse and incompletely understood. Functional genomics analyses have shown that aneuploidy in cancer cells is correlated with diffuse gene expression signatures and that aneuploidy can arise by a variety of mechanisms, including cytokinesis failures, DNA endoreplication and possibly through polyploid intermediate states. Here, we used a novel cell spot microarray technique to identify genes with a loss-of-function effect inducing polyploidy and/or allowing maintenance of polyploid cell growth of breast cancer cells. Integrative genomics profiling of candidate genes highlighted GINS2 as a potential oncogene frequently overexpressed in clinical breast cancers as well as in several other cancer types. Multivariate analysis indicated GINS2 to be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer outcome (p = 0.001). Suppression of GINS2 expression effectively inhibited breast cancer cell growth and induced polyploidy. In addition, protein level detection of nuclear GINS2 accurately distinguished actively proliferating cancer cells suggesting potential use as an operational biomarker.
  • Rinne, Juha K. A.; Ehrlich, Anu; Ward, Jaana; Väyrynen, Ville; Laine, Mikael; Kellokumpu, Ilmo H.; Kairaluoma, Matti; Hyöty, Marja K.; Kössi, Jyrki A. O. (2021)
    Purpose To compare laparoscopic non-CME colectomy with laparoscopic CME colectomy in two hospitals with similar experience in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Methods Data was collected retrospectively from Paijat-Hame Central Hospital (PHCH, NCME group) and Central Finland Central Hospital (CFCH, CME group) records. Elective laparoscopic resections performed during 2007-2016 for UICC stage I-III adenocarcinoma were included to assess differences in short-term outcome and survival. Results There were 340 patients in the NCME group and 325 patients in the CME group. CME delivered longer specimens (p <0.001), wider resection margins (p <0.001), and more lymph nodes (p <0.001) but did not result in better 5-year overall or cancer-specific survival (NCME 77.9% vs CME 72.9%, p = 0.528, NCME 93.2% vs CME 88.9%, p = 0.132, respectively). Thirty-day morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay were similar between the groups. Conversion to open surgery was associated with decreased survival. Discussion Complete mesocolic excision (CME) is reported to improve survival. Most previous studies have compared open CME with open non-CME (NCME) or open CME with laparoscopic CME. NCME populations have been historical or heterogeneous, potentially causing bias in the interpretation of results. Studies comparing laparoscopic CME with laparoscopic NCME are few and involve only small numbers of patients. In this study, diligently performed laparoscopic non-CME D2 resection delivered disease-free survival results comparable with laparoscopic CME but was not safer.