Browsing by Subject "COMPLEX"

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  • Silva, Sofia Marques; Townsend Peterson, A.; Carneiro, Lincoln; Tortola Burlamaqui, Tiberio Cesar; Ribas, Camila C.; Sousa-Neves, Tiago; Miranda, Leonardo S.; Fernandes, Alexandre M.; d'Horta, Fernando M.; Araujo-Silva, Lucas Eduardo; Batista, Romina; Bandeira, Cinthia H. M. M.; Dantas, Sidnei M.; Ferreira, Mateus; Martins, Denise M.; Oliveira, Joiciane; Rocha, Taina C.; Sardelli, Carla H.; Thom, Gregory; Rego, Pericles Sena; Santos, Marcos Persio; Sequeira, Fernando; Vallinoto, Marcelo; Aleixo, Alexandre (2019)
    The Amazon is the primary source of Neotropical diversity and a nexus for discussions on processes that drive biotic diversification. Biogeographers have focused on the roles of rivers and Pleistocene climate change in explaining high rates of speciation. We combine phylogeographic and niche-based paleodistributional projections for 23 upland terra firme forest bird lineages from across the Amazon to derive a new model of regional biological diversification. We found that climate-driven refugial dynamics interact with dynamic riverine barriers to produce a dominant pattern: Older lineages in the wetter western and northern parts of the Amazon gave rise to lineages in the drier southern and eastern parts. This climate/drainage basin evolution interaction links landscape dynamics with biotic diversification and explains the east-west diversity gradients across the Amazon.
  • Colombo, Jessica; Antkowiak, Adrien; Kogan, Konstantin; Kotila, Tommi; Elliott, Jenna; Guillotin, Audrey; Lappalainen, Pekka; Michelot, Alphée (2021)
    Actin polymerization provides force for vital processes of the eukaryotic cell, but our understanding of actin dynamics and energetics remains limited due to the lack of high-quality probes. Most current probes affect dynamics of actin or its interactions with actin-binding proteins (ABPs), and cannot track the bound nucleotide. Here, we identify a family of highly sensitive fluorescent nucleotide analogues structurally compatible with actin. We demonstrate that these fluorescent nucleotides bind to actin, maintain functional interactions with a number of essential ABPs, are hydrolyzed within actin filaments, and provide energy to power actin-based processes. These probes also enable monitoring actin assembly and nucleotide exchange with single-molecule microscopy and fluorescence anisotropy kinetics, therefore providing robust and highly versatile tools to study actin dynamics and functions of ABPs.
  • El-Khoury, Riyad; Dufour, Eric; Rak, Malgorzata; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Grandchamp, Nicolas; Csaba, Zsolt; Duvillie, Bertrand; Benit, Paule; Gallego, Jorge; Gressens, Pierre; Sarkis, Chamsy; Jacobs, Howard T.; Rustin, Pierre (2013)
  • Sobral-Leite, Marcelo; Wesseling, Jelle; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; van Miltenburg, Martine H.; Sanders, Joyce; Hofland, Ingrid; Blows, Fiona M.; Coulson, Penny; Patrycja, Gazinska; Schellens, Jan H. M.; Fagerholm, Rainer; Heikkila, Paivi; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Provenzano, Elena; Ali, Hamid Raza; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Vachon, Celine; Visscher, Daniel; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W. M.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van de Water, Bob; Broeks, Annegien; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; de Graauw, Marjo; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; kConFab AOCS Investigators (2015)
    Background: Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a protein related with the carcinogenesis process and metastasis formation in many tumors. However, little is known about the prognostic value of ANXA1 in breast cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between ANXA1 expression, BRCA1/2 germline carriership, specific tumor subtypes and survival in breast cancer patients. Methods: Clinical-pathological information and follow-up data were collected from nine breast cancer studies from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) (n = 5,752) and from one study of familial breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations (n = 107). ANXA1 expression was scored based on the percentage of immunohistochemical staining in tumor cells. Survival analyses were performed using a multivariable Cox model. Results: The frequency of ANXA1 positive tumors was higher in familial breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations than in BCAC patients, with 48.6 % versus 12.4 %, respectively; P <0.0001. ANXA1 was also highly expressed in BCAC tumors that were poorly differentiated, triple negative, EGFR-CK5/6 positive or had developed in patients at a young age. In the first 5 years of follow-up, patients with ANXA1 positive tumors had a worse breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) than ANXA1 negative (HRadj = 1.35; 95 % CI = 1.05-1.73), but the association weakened after 10 years (HRadj = 1.13; 95 % CI = 0.91-1.40). ANXA1 was a significant independent predictor of survival in HER2+ patients (10-years BCSS: HRadj = 1.70; 95 % CI = 1.17-2.45). Conclusions: ANXA1 is overexpressed in familial breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations and correlated with poor prognosis features: triple negative and poorly differentiated tumors. ANXA1 might be a biomarker candidate for breast cancer survival prediction in high risk groups such as HER2+ cases.
  • Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka; Partinen, Markku; Vaarala, Outi; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Sundman, Jonas; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Hublin, Christer; Julkunen, Ilkka; Olsen, Paivi; Saarenpaa-Heikkila, Outi; Kilpi, Terhi (2012)
  • Myllymaki, Satu-Marja; Kämäräinen, Ulla-Reetta; Liu, Xiaonan; Cruz, Sara Pereira; Miettinen, Sini; Vuorela, Mikko; Varjosalo, Markku; Manninen, Aki (2019)
    Integrin-mediated laminin adhesions mediate epithelial cell anchorage to basement membranes and are critical regulators of epithelial cell polarity. Integrins assemble large multiprotein complexes that link to the cytoskeleton and convey signals into the cells. Comprehensive proteomic analyses of actin network-linked focal adhesions (FA) have been performed, but the molecular composition of intermediate filament-linked hemidesmosomes (HD) remains incompletely characterized. Here we have used proximity-dependent biotin identification (BioID) technology to label and characterize the interactome of epithelia-specific beta 4-integrin that, as alpha 6 beta 4-heterodimer, forms the core of HDs. The analysis identified similar to 150 proteins that were specifically labeled by BirA-tagged integrin-beta 4. In addition to known HDs proteins, the interactome revealed proteins that may indirectly link integrin-beta 4 to actin-connected protein complexes, such as FAs and dystrophin/dystroglycan complexes. The specificity of the screening approach was validated by confirming the HD localization of two candidate beta 4-interacting proteins, utrophin (UTRN) and ELKS/Rab6-interacting/CAST family member 1 (ERC1). Interestingly, although establishment of functional HDs depends on the formation of alpha 6 beta 4-heterodimers, the assembly of beta 4-interactome was not strictly dependent on alpha 6-integrin expression. Our survey to the HD interactome sets a precedent for future studies and provides novel insight into the mechanisms of HD assembly and function of the beta 4-integrin.
  • Ilyas, Maria; Mietzsch, Mario; Kailasan, Shweta; Väisänen, Elina; Luo, Mengxiao; Chipman, Paul; Smith, J. Kennon; Kurian, Justin; Sousa, Duncan; McKenna, Robert; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis (2018)
    Bufavirus strain 1 (BuV1), a member of the Protoparvovirus genus of the Parvoviridae, was first isolated from fecal samples of children with acute diarrhea in Burkina Faso. Since this initial discovery, BuVs have been isolated in several countries, including Finland, the Netherlands, and Bhutan, in pediatric patients exhibiting similar symptoms. Towards their characterization, the structures of virus-like particles of BuV1, BuV2, and BuV3, the current known genotypes, have been determined by cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction to 2.84, 3.79, and 3.25 angstrom, respectively. The BuVs, 65-73% identical in amino acid sequence, conserve the major viral protein, VP2, structure and general capsid surface features of parvoviruses. These include a core -barrel (B-I), -helix A, and large surface loops inserted between these elements in VP2. The capsid contains depressions at the icosahedral 2-fold and around the 5-fold axes, and has three separated protrusions surrounding the 3-fold axes. Structure comparison among the BuVs and to available parvovirus structures revealed capsid surface variations and capsid 3-fold protrusions that depart from the single pinwheel arrangement of the animal protoparvoviruses. These structures provide a platform to begin the molecular characterization of these potentially pathogenic viruses.
  • Moles, Laura; Gomez, Marta; Heilig, Hans; Bustos, Gerardo; Fuentes, Susana; de Vos, Willem; Fernandez, Leonides; Rodriguez, Juan M.; Jimenez, Esther (2013)
  • Lutfullahoglu-Bal, Guleycan; Keskin, Abdurrahman; Seferoglu, Ayse Bengisu; Dunn, Cory D. (2017)
    Background: During the generation and evolution of the eukaryotic cell, a proteobacterial endosymbiont was re-fashioned into the mitochondrion, an organelle that appears to have been present in the ancestor of all present-day eukaryotes. Mitochondria harbor proteomes derived from coding information located both inside and outside the organelle, and the rate-limiting step toward the formation of eukaryotic cells may have been development of an import apparatus allowing protein entry to mitochondria. Currently, a widely conserved translocon allows proteins to pass from the cytosol into mitochondria, but how proteins encoded outside of mitochondria were first directed to these organelles at the dawn of eukaryogenesis is not clear. Because several proteins targeted by a carboxyl-terminal tail anchor (TA) appear to have the ability to insert spontaneously into the mitochondrial outer membrane (OM), it is possible that self-inserting, tail-anchored polypeptides obtained from bacteria might have formed the first gate allowing proteins to access mitochondria from the cytosol. Results: Here, we tested whether bacterial TAs are capable of targeting to mitochondria. In a survey of proteins encoded by the proteobacterium Escherichia coli, predicted TA sequences were directed to specific subcellular locations within the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Importantly, TAs obtained from DUF883 family members ElaB and YqjD were abundantly localized to and inserted at the mitochondrial OM. Conclusions: Our results support the notion that eukaryotic cells are able to utilize membrane-targeting signals present in bacterial proteins obtained by lateral gene transfer, and our findings make plausible a model in which mitochondrial protein translocation was first driven by tail-anchored proteins.
  • Patwardhan, Ardan; Brandt, Robert; Butcher, Sarah J.; Collinson, Lucy; Gault, David; Grunewald, Kay; Hecksel, Corey; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Iudin, Andrii; Jones, Martin L.; Korir, Paul K.; Koster, Abraham J.; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Lawson, Catherine L.; Mastronarde, David; McCormick, Matthew; Parkinson, Helen; Rosenthal, Peter B.; Saalfeld, Stephan; Saibil, Helen R.; Sarntivijai, Sirarat; Valero, Irene Solanes; Subramaniam, Sriram; Swedlow, Jason R.; Tudose, Ilinca; Winn, Martyn; Kleywegt, Gerard J. (2017)
    The integration of cellular and molecular structural data is key to understanding the function of macromolecular assemblies and complexes in their in vivo context. Here we report on the outcomes of a workshop that discussed how to integrate structural data from a range of public archives. The workshop identified two main priorities: the development of tools and file formats to support segmentation (that is, the decomposition of a three-dimensional volume into regions that can be associated with defined objects), and the development of tools to support the annotation of biological structures.
  • Kallijärvi, Jukka; Stratoulias, Vassilis; Virtanen, Kristel; Hietakangas, Ville; Heino, Tapio I.; Saarma, Mart (2012)
  • Rausalu, Kai; Utt, Age; Quirin, Tania; Varghese, Finny S.; Zusinaite, Eva; Das, Pratyush Kumar; Ahola, Tero; Merits, Andres (2016)
    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, has a positive-stand RNA genome approximately 12 kb in length. In infected cells, the genome is translated into non-structural polyprotein P1234, an inactive precursor of the viral replicase, which is activated by cleavages carried out by the non-structural protease, nsP2. We have characterized CHIKV nsP2 using both cell-free and cell-based assays. First, we show that Cys478 residue in the active site of CHIKV nsP2 is indispensable for P1234 processing. Second, the substrate requirements of CHIKV nsP2 are quite similar to those of nsP2 of related Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Third, substitution of Ser482 residue, recently reported to contribute to the protease activity of nsP2, with Ala has almost no negative effect on the protease activity of CHIKV nsP2. Fourth, Cys478 to Ala as well as Trp479 to Ala mutations in nsP2 completely abolished RNA replication in CHIKV and SFV trans-replication systems. In contrast, trans-replicases with Ser482 to Ala mutation were similar to wild type counterparts. Fifth, Cys478 to Ala as well as Trp479 to Ala mutations in nsP2 abolished the rescue of infectious virus from CHIKV RNA transcripts while Ser482 to Ala mutation had no effect. Thus, CHIKV nsP2 is a cysteine protease.
  • Gorvin, C.M.; Hannan, F.M.; Cranston, T.; Valta, Helena; Mäkitie, Outi; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Thakker, R.V. (2018)
    G-protein subunit -11 (G(11)) couples the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated intracellular calcium (Ca-i(2+)) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, which in the parathyroid glands and kidneys regulates parathyroid hormone release and urinary calcium excretion, respectively. Heterozygous germline loss-of-function G(11) mutations cause familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia type 2 (FHH2), for which effective therapies are currently not available. Here, we report a novel heterozygous G(11) germline mutation, Phe220Ser, which was associated with hypercalcemia in a family with FHH2. Homology modeling showed the wild-type (WT) Phe220 nonpolar residue to form part of a cluster of hydrophobic residues within a highly conserved cleft region of G(11), which binds to and activates PLC; and predicted that substitution of Phe220 with the mutant Ser220 polar hydrophilic residue would disrupt PLC-mediated signaling. In vitro studies involving transient transfection of WT and mutant G(11) proteins into HEK293 cells, which express the CaSR, showed the mutant Ser220 G(11) protein to impair CaSR-mediated Ca-i(2+) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) MAPK signaling, consistent with diminished activation of PLC. Furthermore, engineered mutagenesis studies demonstrated that loss of hydrophobicity within the G(11) cleft region also impaired signaling by PLC. The loss-of-function associated with the Ser220 G(11) mutant was rectified by treatment of cells with cinacalcet, which is a CaSR-positive allosteric modulator. Furthermore, in vivo administration of cinacalcet to the proband harboring the Phe220Ser G(11) mutation, normalized serum ionized calcium concentrations. Thus, our studies, which report a novel G(11) germline mutation (Phe220Ser) in a family with FHH2, reveal the importance of the G(11) hydrophobic cleft region for CaSR-mediated activation of PLC, and show that allosteric CaSR modulation can rectify the loss-of-function Phe220Ser mutation and ameliorate the hypercalcemia associated with FHH2. (c) 2017 The Authors. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.
  • Tirkkonen, Taneli; Pakarinen, Jaakko; Rintala, Elina; Ali-Vehmas, Terhi; Marttila, Harri; Peltoniemi, Olli A. T.; Makinen, Johanna (2010)
  • Przybyla, Beata; Pinomäki, Anne; Petäjä, Jari; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta; Strandberg, Karin; Hillarp, Andreas; Öhlin, Ann-Kristin; Ruutu, Tapani; Volin, Liisa; Lassila, Riitta (2017)
    Background Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) enhances coagulation via endothelial perturbation and inflammation. Role of natural anticoagulants in interactions between coagulation and inflammation as well as in acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) are not well known. The purpose of this study was to define changes in natural anticoagulants over time in association with GVHD. Patients and methods This prospective study included 30 patients who received grafts from siblings (n = 19) or unrelated donors (n = 11). Eight patients developed GVHD. Standard clinical assays were applied to measure natural anticoagulants, represented by protein C (PC), antithrombin (AT), protein S (PS), complex of activated PC with its inhibitor (APC-PCI) and by markers of endothelial activation: Factor VIII coagulant activity (FVIII: C) and soluble thrombomodulin (s-TM) at 6-8 time points over three months. Results Overall, PC, AT and FVIII: C increased in parallel after engraftment. Significant correlations between PC and FVIII: C (r = 0.64-0.82, p Conclusion The coordinated activation of natural anticoagulants in our longitudinal study indicates the sustained ability of adaptation to endothelial and inflammatory activation during allogenic SCT treatment. The suboptimal control of coagulation by natural anticoagulants at early stage of SCT may contribute to onset of GVHD.
  • Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Vallenius, Tea Kaarina; Geers, Erica F.; Greene, Lois; Mäkelä, Tomi; Medema, Rene H. (2010)
  • Percipallea, Piergiorgio; Vartiainen, Maria (2019)
    The emerging role of cytoskeletal proteins in the cell nucleus has become a new frontier in cell biology. Actin and actin-binding proteins regulate chromatin and gene expression, but importantly they are beginning to be essential players in genome organization. These actin-based functions contribute to genome stability and integrity while affecting DNA replication and global transcription patterns. This is likely to occur through interactions of actin with nuclear components including nuclear lamina and subnuclear organelles. An exciting future challenge is to understand how these actin-based genome-wide mechanisms may regulate development and differentiation by interfering with the mechanical properties of the cell nucleus and how regulated actin polymerization plays a role in maintaining nuclear architecture. With a special focus on actin, here we summarize how cytoskeletal proteins operate in the nucleus and how they may be important to consolidate nuclear architecture for sustained gene expression or silencing.
  • Nasibullin, R. T.; Valiev, R. R.; Faiskanova, K. M.; Stepanova, E.; Cherepanov, V. N.; Filimonov, V. D.; Sundholm, D. (2019)
    Acetyl protecting groups are commonly used in carbohydrate chemistry. Partially acetylated arylglycosides are not only useful building blocks in syntheses, but they are also substantial for plant metabolism. Nonselective base catalysis is often used for removing the acetyl groups. Even though acid-catalyzed deacetylation might be more selective, it is seldom used in carbohydrate chemistry, because it has not been thoroughly investigated. In this work, we study the acid-catalyzed deacetylation of per-acetylated phenyl glycosides experimentally and computationally by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Based on quantum modeling, we design a general scheme for the stepwise acid-catalyzed deacetylation of arylglycosides per-acetates. The approach can also be applied on gluco- and galactopyranosides. We have studied the deacetylation reaction in solvents of different polarity and found that the activation barriers of the stepwise deacetylation mechanism increase with increasing polarity of the solvent.
  • Virtanen, Jori A.; Vartiainen, Maria K. (2017)
    In addition to its essential roles as part of the cytoskeleton, actin has also been linked to many processes in the nucleus. Recent data has demonstrated the presence of both monomeric and polymeric actin in the nucleus, and implied distinct functional roles for these actin pools. Monomeric actin seems to be involved in regulation of gene expression through transcription factors, chromatin regulating complexes and RNA polymerases. In addition to cytoplasmic actin regulators, nuclear proteins, such as emerin, can regulate actin polymerization properties specifically in this compartment. Besides of structural roles, nuclear actin filaments may be required for organizing the nuclear contents and for the maintenance of genomic integrity.
  • Groeneveld, Linn F.; Gregusson, Sigbjorn; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Hiemstra, Sipke J.; Hveem, Kristian; Kantanen, Juha; Lohi, Hannes; Stroemstedt, Lina; Berg, Peer (2016)
    In the past decade, biobanking has fuelled great scientific advances in the human medical sector. Well-established domesticated animal biobanks and integrated networks likewise harbour immense potential for great scientific advances with broad societal impacts, which are currently not being fully realised. Political and scientific leaders as well as journals and ethics committees should help to ensure that we are well equipped to meet future demands in livestock production, animal models, and veterinary care of companion animals.