Browsing by Subject "CONDENSED TANNINS"

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  • Adamczyk, Bartosz; Sietio, Outi-Maaria; Biasi, Christina; Heinonsalo, Jussi (2019)
    See also the Commentary on this article by Hattenschwiler et al., 223: 5-7.
  • Paaso, Ulla; Keski-Saari, Sarita; Keinänen, Markku; Karvinen, Heini; Silfver, Tarja; Rousi, Matti; Mikola, Juha (2017)
    Abundant secondary metabolites, such as condensed tannins, and their interpopulation genotypic variation can remain through plant leaf senescence and affect litter decomposition. Whether the intrapopulation genotypic variation of a more diverse assortment of secondary metabolites equally persists through leaf senescence and litter decomposition is not well understood. We analyzed concentrations of intracellular phenolics, epicuticular flavonoid aglycones, epicuticular triterpenoids, condensed tannins, and lignin in green leaves, senescent leaves and partly decomposed litter of silver birch, Betula pendula. Broad-sense heritability (H-2) and coefficient of genotypic variation (CVG) were estimated for metabolites in senescent leaves and litter using 19 genotypes selected from a B. pendula population in southern Finland. We found that most of the secondary metabolites remained through senescence and decomposition and that their persistence was related to their chemical properties. Intrapopulation H-2 and CVG for intracellular phenolics, epicuticular flavonoid aglycones and condensed tannins were high and remarkably, increased from senescent leaves to decomposed litter. The rank of genotypes in metabolite concentrations was persistent through litter decomposition. Lignin was an exception, however, with a diminishing genotypic variation during decomposition, and the concentrations of lignin and condensed tannins had a negative genotypic correlation in the senescent leaves. Our results show that secondary metabolites and their intrapopulation genotypic variation can for the most part remain through leaf senescence and early decomposition, which is a prerequisite for initial litter quality to predict variation in litter decomposition rates. Persistent genotypic variation also opens an avenue for selection to impact litter decomposition in B. pendula populations through acting on their green foliage secondary chemistry. The negative genotypic correlations and diminishing heritability of lignin concentrations may, however, counteract this process.
  • Jyske, Tuula; Kuroda, Katsushi; Kerio, Susanna; Pranovich, Andrey; Linnakoski, Riikka; Hayashi, Noriko; Aoki, Dan; Fukushima, Kazuhiko (2020)
    To understand the positional and temporal defense mechanisms of coniferous tree bark at the tissue and cellular levels, the phloem topochemistry and structural properties were examined after artificially induced bark defense reactions. Wounding and fungal inoculation withEndoconidiophora polonicaof spruce bark were carried out, and phloem tissues were frequently collected to follow the temporal and spatial progress of chemical and structural responses. The changes in (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, stilbene glucoside, and resin acid distribution, and accumulation patterns within the phloem, were mapped using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (cryo-ToF-SIMS), alongside detailed structural (LM, TEM, SEM) and quantitative chemical microanalyses of the tissues. Our results show that axial phloem parenchyma cells of Norway spruce contain (+)-catechins, the amount of which locally increases in response to fungal inoculation. The preformed, constitutive distribution and accumulation patterns of (+)-catechins closely follow those of stilbene glucosides. Phloem phenolics are not translocated but form a layered defense barrier with oleoresin compounds in response to pathogen attack. Our results suggest that axial phloem parenchyma cells are the primary location for (+)-catechin storage and synthesis in Norway spruce phloem. Chemical mapping of bark defensive metabolites by cryo-ToF-SIMS, in addition to structural and chemical microanalyses of the defense reactions, can provide novel information on the local amplitudes and localizations of chemical and structural defense mechanisms and pathogen-host interactions of trees.
  • Adamczyk, Bartosz; Adamczyk, Sylwia; Smolander, Aino; Kitunen, Veikko; Simon, Judy (2018)
    Processes underlying soil organic matter (SOM) transformations are meeting growing interest as SOM contains more carbon (C) than global vegetation and the atmosphere combined. Therefore, SOM is a crucial element of the C cycle, especially in ecosystems rich in organic matter, such as boreal forests. However, climate change may shift the fate of this SOM from C sink into C source, accelerating global warming. These processes require a better understanding of the involved mechanisms driving both the C cycle and the interlinked nitrogen (N) cycle. SOM transformations are balanced by a network of interactions between biological, chemical and physical factors. In this review, we discuss the findings of the most recent studies to the current state of knowledge about the main drivers in SOM transformations. We focus on plant-derived secondary metabolites, as their biochemical traits, especially interactions with soil microbial communities, organic N compounds and enzymes make them potential regulators of SOM decomposition. However, these regulatory abilities of plant-derived compounds are not fully explored.
  • Raitanen, Jan-Erik; Järvenpää, Eila; Korpinen, Risto; Mäkinen, Sari; Hellström, Jarkko; Kilpeläinen, Petri; Liimatainen, Jaana; Ora, Ari; Tupasela, Tuomo; Jyske, Tuula (2020)
    Bark of Norway spruce and Scots pine trees contain large amounts of condensed tannins. Tannins extracted with hot water could be used in different applications as they possess antioxidative and antimicrobial activities. The use of bark tannins as e.g., food preservatives calls for increases in our knowledge of their antioxidative activities when applied in foodstuffs. To assess the ability of bark tannins to prevent lipid oxidation, hot water extracts were evaluated in a liposome model. Isolated tannins were also applied in dry-cured, salty meat snacks either as liquid extracts or in dry-powder form. Consumer acceptance of the snacks was tested by a sensory evaluation panel where outlook, odor, taste, and structure of the snacks were evaluated and compared to a commercial product without tannin ingredients. Our results show that conifer bark tannin-rich extracts have high capacity to prevent lipid oxidation in the liposome model. The efficacies of pine and spruce bark extracts were ten to hundred folds higher, respectively, than those of phenolic berry extracts. The bark extracts did not significantly influence the odor or taste of the meat snacks. The findings indicate that bark extracts may be used as sustainable food ingredients. However, more research is needed to verify their safety.