Browsing by Subject "CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE"

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  • Catapano, Alberico L.; Graham, Ian; De Backer, Guy; Wiklund, Olov; Chapman, M. John; Drexel, Heinz; Hoes, Arno W.; Jennings, Catriona S.; Landmesser, Ulf; Pedersen, Terje R.; Reiner, Zeljko; Riccardi, Gabriele; Taskinen, Marja-Riita; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Wood, David A.; Luis Zamorano, Jose (2016)
  • Task Force Members; ESC Comm Practice Guidelines CPG; ESC Natl Cardiac Societies; Mach, Francois; Baigent, Colin; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta (2019)
  • Motazacker, Mahdi M.; Pirhonen, Juho; van Capelleveen, Julian C.; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Shah, Saundarya; Hovingh, G. Kees; Metso, Jari; Li, Shiqian; Ikonen, Elina; Jauhiainen, Matti; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Olkkonen, Vesa M. (2016)
    Background and aims: Among subjects with high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) below the 1st percentile in the general population, we identified a heterozygous variant OSBPL1A p.C39X encoding a short truncated protein fragment that co-segregated with low plasma HDL-C. Methods: We investigated the composition and function of HDL from the carriers and non-carriers and studied the properties of the mutant protein in cultured hepatocytes. Results: Plasma HDL-C and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I were lower in carriers versus non-carriers, whereas the other analyzed plasma components or HDL parameters did not differ. Sera of the carriers displayed a reduced capacity to act as cholesterol efflux acceptors (p <0.01), whereas the cholesterol acceptor capacity of their isolated HDL was normal. Fibroblasts from a p.C39X carrier showed reduced cholesterol efflux to lipid-free apoA-I but not to mature HDL particles, suggesting a specific defect in ABCA1-mediated efflux pathway. In hepatic cells, GFP-OSBPL1A partially co-localized in endosomes containing fluorescent apoA-I, suggesting that OSBPL1A may regulate the intracellular handling of apoA-I. The GFP-OSBPL1A-39X mutant protein remained in the cytosol and failed to interact with Rab7, which normally recruits OSBPL1A to late endosomes/lysosomes, suggesting that this mutation represents a loss-of-function. Conclusions: The present work represents the first characterization of a human OSBPL1A mutation. Our observations provide evidence that a familial loss-of-function mutation in OSBPL1A affects the first step of the reverse cholesterol transport process and associates with a low HDL-C phenotype. This suggests that rare mutations in OSBPL genes may contribute to dyslipidemias. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Hintsanen, Mirka; Kivimäki, Mika; Hintsa, Taina; Theorell, T.; Elovainio, Marko; Raitakari, O. T.; Viikari, J. S. A.; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa (2010)
  • Mikkola, Tuija M.; Kautiainen, Hannu; Mänty, Minna; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B.; Kröger, Teppo; Eriksson, Johan G. (2021)
    Background Evidence on family caregivers' health is conflicting. Aim To investigate all-cause and cause-specific mortality in Finnish family caregivers providing high-intensity care and to assess whether age modifies the association between family caregiver status and mortality using data from multiple national registers. Methods The data include all individuals, who received family caregiver's allowance in Finland in 2012 (n = 42,256, mean age 67 years, 71% women) and a control population matched for age, sex, and municipality of residence (n = 83,618). Information on dates and causes of death between 2012 and 2017 were obtained from the Finnish Causes of Death Register. Results Family caregivers had lower all-cause mortality than the controls over the follow-up (8.1 vs. 11.6%) both among women (socioeconomic status adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.64, 95% CI 0.61-0.68) and men (adjusted HR: 0.73, 95% CI 0.70-0.77). When modelling all-cause mortality as a function of age, younger caregivers had only slightly lower or equal mortality to their controls, but older caregivers had markedly lower mortality than their controls, up to more than 10% lower. Caregivers had a lower mortality rate for all the causes of death studied, namely cardiovascular, cancer, neurological, external, respiratory, gastrointestinal and dementia. The lowest risk was for dementia (subhazard ratio = 0.29, 95% CI 0.25-0.34). Conclusions Older family caregivers had lower mortality than the age-matched general population while mortality did not differ according to caregiver status in young adulthood. This age-dependent advantage in mortality is likely to reflect the selection of healthier individuals into the family caregiver role.
  • Neuman, Manuela G.; French, Samuel W.; Zakhari, Samir; Malnick, Stephen; Seitz, Helmut K.; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Salaspuro, Mikko; Voinea-Griffin, Andreea; Barasch, Andrei; Kirpich, Irina A.; Thomes, Paul G.; Schrum, Laura W.; Donohue, Terrence M.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Cruz, Marcus; Opris, Mihai (2017)
    This paper is based upon the "8th Charles Lieber's Satellite Symposium" organized by Manuela G. Neuman at the Research Society on Alcoholism Annual Meeting, on June 25, 2016 at New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. The integrative symposium investigated different aspects of alcohol-induced liver disease (ALD) as well as non alcohol -induced liver disease (NAFLD) and possible repair. We revealed the basic aspects of alcohol metabolism that may be responsible for the development of liver disease as well as the factors that determine the amount, frequency and which type of alcohol misuse leads to liver and gastrointestinal diseases. We aimed to (1) describe the immuno-pathology of ALD, (2) examine the role of genetics in the development of alcoholic hepatitis (ASH) and NAFLD, (3) propose diagnostic markers of ASH and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), (4) examine age and ethnic differences as well as analyze the validity of some models, (5) develop common research tools and biomarkers to study alcohol-induced effects, 6) examine the role of alcohol in oral health and colon and gastrointestinal cancer and (7) focus on factors that aggravate the severity of organ-damage. The present review includes pre-clinical, translational and clinical research that characterizes ALD and NAFLD. Strong clinical and experimental evidence lead to recognition of the key toxic role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of ALD with simple fatty infiltrations and chronic alcoholic hepatitis with hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. These latter stages may also be associated with a number of cellular and histological changes, including the presence of Mallory's hyaline, megamitochondria, or perivenular.and perisinusoidal fibrosis. Genetic polymorphisms of ethanol metabolizing enzymes and cytochrome p450 (CYP) 2E1 activation may change the severity of ASH and NASH. Other risk factors such as its co-morbidities with chronic viral hepatitis in the presence or absence of human deficiency virus were discussed. Dysregulation of metabolism, as a result of ethanol exposure, in the intestine leads to colon carcinogenesis. The hepatotoxic effects of ethanol undermine the contribution of malnutrition to the liver injury. Dietary interventions such as micro and macronutrients, as well as changes to the microbiota have been suggested. The clinical aspects of NASH, as part of the metabolic syndrome in the aging population, have been presented. The symposium addressed mechanisms and biomarkers of alcohol induced damage to different organs, as well as the role of the microbiome in this dialog. The microbiota regulates and acts as a key element in harmonizing immune responses at intestinal mucosal surfaces. It is known that microbiota is an inducer of proinflammatory T helper 17 cells and regulatory T cells in the intestine. The signals at the sites of inflammation mediate recruitment and differentiation in order to remove inflammatory inducers and promote tissue homeostasis restoration. The change in the intestinal microbiota also influences the change in obesity and regresses the liver steatosis. Evidence on the positive role of moderate alcohol consumption on heart and metabolic diseases as well on reducing steatosis have been looked up. Moreover nutrition as a therapeutic intervention in alcoholic liver disease has been discussed. In addition to the original data, we searched the literature (2008-2016) for the latest publication on the described subjects. In order to obtain the updated data we used the usual engines (Pub Med and Google Scholar). The intention of the eighth symposia was to advance the international profile of the biological research on alcoholism. We also wish to further our mission of leading the forum to progress the science and practice of translational research in alcoholism. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Finndiane Study Grp (2018)
    Aims/hypothesis This study aimed to assess the use of ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) to identify the presence of masked, nocturnal and white-coat hypertension in individuals with type 1 diabetes, patterns that could not be detected by regular office-based BP monitoring alone. We also analysed associations between BP patterns and arterial stiffness in order to identify individuals at cardiovascular risk. Methods This substudy included 140 individuals with type 1 diabetes from the Helsinki metropolitan area, who attended the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study (FinnDiane) Centre in Helsinki between January 2013 and August 2017. Twenty-four hour ABPM and pulse wave analysis were performed simultaneously using a validated non-invasive brachial oscillometric device (Mobil-O-Graph). Definitions of hypertension were based on the European Society of Hypertension guidelines. Masked hypertension was defined as normal office BP (BP obtained using a standardised automated BP device) but elevated 24 h ABPM, and white-coat hypertension as elevated office BP but normal 24 h ABPM. Results A total of 38% of individuals were normotensive and 33% had sustained hypertension, while 23% had masked and 6% had white-coat hypertension. About half of the cohort had increased absolute levels of night-time BP, half of whom were untreated. In the ambulatory setting, central BP and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were higher in participants with masked hypertension than in those with normotension (p <0.001). In a multivariable linear regression model adjusted for age, sex, BMI, antihypertensive treatment and eGFR, masked hypertension was independently associated with higher 24 h PWV ((3 0.50 [95% CI 0.34, 0.66]), but not with PWV obtained during resting conditions (adjusted 13 0.28 [95% CI -0.53, 1.10]), using normotension as the reference group. Conclusions/interpretation ABPM analysis revealed that one-quarter of the participants with type 1 diabetes had masked hypertension; these individuals would not have been detected by office BP alone. Moreover, arterial stiffness was increased in individuals with masked hypertension. These findings support the use of ABPM to identify individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • Finndiane Study Grp (2018)
    Background and aims: Increased arterial stiffness contributes to diabetic vascular complications. We identified dietary factors related to arterial stiffness in individuals with type 1 diabetes, a population with high risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods and results: Altogether, 612 participants (40% men, mean +/- standard deviation age 45 +/- 13 years) completed a validated diet questionnaire and underwent measurements of arterial stiffness. Of these, 470 additionally completed a food record. Exploratory factor analysis was applied to identify dietary patterns from the diet questionnaires, and nutrient intakes were calculated from food record entries. Arterial stiffness was measured by applanation tonometry. Of the seven dietary factors formed, the factor scores of "Full-fat cheese and eggs" and "Sweet" patterns were negatively associated with measures of arterial stiffness. In the multivariable macronutrient substitution models, favouring carbohydrates over fats was associated with higher aortic mean arterial pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity. When carbohydrates were consumed in place of proteins, higher aortic pulse pressure, aortic mean arterial pressure, and augmentation index were recorded. Replacing energy from alcohol with proteins, was associated with lower aortic pulse pressure, aortic mean arterial pressure, and augmentation index. Relative distributions of dietary fatty acids were neutral with respect to the measures of arterial stiffness. Conclusion: The macronutrient distribution of the diet is likely to affect the resilience of the arteries. Our observations suggest that reducing energy intake from carbohydrates and alcohol may be beneficial. These observations, especially those dealing with dietary patterns, need to be confirmed in a longitudinal study. (C) 2018 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Batty, G. David; Sabia, Severine; Sommerlad, Andrew; Floud, Sarah; Jokela, Markus; Vahtera, Jussi; Beydoun, May A.; Suominen, Sakari B.; Koskinen, Aki; Väänänen, Ari; Goldberg, Marcel; Zins, Marie; Alfredsson, Lars; Westerholm, Peter J. M.; Knutsson, Anders; Nyberg, Solja T.; Sipilä, Pyry N.; Lindbohm, Joni V.; Pentti, Jaana; Livingston, Gill; Ferrie, Jane E.; Strandberg, Timo (2020)
    This cohort study examines the association of overall consumption of alcohol and resultant loss of consciousness with risk for dementia. Question Are alcohol-induced loss of consciousness and heavy weekly alcohol consumption associated with increased risk of future dementia? Findings In this multicohort study of 131x202f;415 adults, a 1.2-fold excess risk of dementia was associated with heavy vs moderate alcohol consumption. Those who reported having lost consciousness due to alcohol consumption, regardless of their overall weekly consumption, had a 2-fold increased risk of dementia compared with people who had not lost consciousness and were moderate drinkers. Meaning The findings of this study suggest that alcohol-induced loss of consciousness is a long-term risk factor for dementia among both heavy and moderate drinkers. Importance Evidence on alcohol consumption as a risk factor for dementia usually relates to overall consumption. The role of alcohol-induced loss of consciousness is uncertain. Objective To examine the risk of future dementia associated with overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-induced loss of consciousness in a population of current drinkers. Design, Setting, and Participants Seven cohort studies from the UK, France, Sweden, and Finland (IPD-Work consortium) including 131x202f;415 participants were examined. At baseline (1986-2012), participants were aged 18 to 77 years, reported alcohol consumption, and were free of diagnosed dementia. Dementia was examined during a mean follow-up of 14.4 years (range, 12.3-30.1). Data analysis was conducted from November 17, 2019, to May 23, 2020. Exposures Self-reported overall consumption and loss of consciousness due to alcohol consumption were assessed at baseline. Two thresholds were used to define heavy overall consumption: greater than 14 units (U) (UK definition) and greater than 21 U (US definition) per week. Main Outcomes and Measures Dementia and alcohol-related disorders to 2016 were ascertained from linked electronic health records. Results Of the 131x202f;415 participants (mean [SD] age, 43.0 [10.4] years; 80x202f;344 [61.1%] women), 1081 individuals (0.8%) developed dementia. After adjustment for potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) was 1.16 (95% CI, 0.98-1.37) for consuming greater than 14 vs 1 to 14 U of alcohol per week and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.01-1.48) for greater than 21 vs 1 to 21 U/wk. Of the 96x202f;591 participants with data on loss of consciousness, 10x202f;004 individuals (10.4%) reported having lost consciousness due to alcohol consumption in the past 12 months. The association between loss of consciousness and dementia was observed in men (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.77-4.63) and women (HR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.34-3.25) during the first 10 years of follow-up (HR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.78-4.15), after excluding the first 10 years of follow-up (HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.16-2.99), and for early-onset (= 65 y: HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.38-3.66) dementia, Alzheimer disease (HR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.28-3.07), and dementia with features of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (HR, 4.18; 95% CI, 1.86-9.37). The association with dementia was not explained by 14 other alcohol-related conditions. With moderate drinkers (1-14 U/wk) who had not lost consciousness as the reference group, the HR for dementia was twice as high in participants who reported having lost consciousness, whether their mean weekly consumption was moderate (HR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.42-3.37) or heavy (HR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.57-3.54). Conclusions and Relevance The findings of this study suggest that alcohol-induced loss of consciousness, irrespective of overall alcohol consumption, is associated with a subsequent increase in the risk of dementia.
  • Jelenkovic, Aline; Silventoinen, Karri; Tynelius, Per; Myrskylä, Mikko; Rasmussen, Finn (2013)
  • Akbaraly, Tasnime; Wurtz, Peter; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Shipley, Martin J.; Haapakoski, Rita; Lehto, Maili; Desrumaux, Catherine; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mikkilä, Vera; Hingorani, Aroon; Humphries, Steve E.; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Raitakari, Olli; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kivimäki, Mika (2018)
    Diet may modify metabolomic profiles towards higher or lower cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We aimed to identify metabolite profiles associated with high adherence to dietary recommendations-the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) - and the extent to which metabolites associated with AHEI also predict incident CVD. Relations between AHEI score and 80 circulating lipids and metabolites, quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics, were examined using linear regression models in the Whitehall II study (n = 4824, 55.9 +/- 6.1 years, 28.0% women) and were replicated in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (n = 1716, 37.7 +/- 5.0 years, 56.3% women). We used Cox models to study associations between metabolites and incident CVD over the 15.8-year follow-up in the Whitehall II study. After adjustment for confounders, higher AHEI score (indicating healthier diet) was associated with higher degree of unsaturation of fatty acids (FA) and higher ratios of polyunsaturated FA, omega-3 and docosahexaenoic acid relative to total FA in both Whitehall II and Young Finns studies. A concordance of associations of metabolites with higher AHEI score and lower CVD risk was observed in Whitehall II. Adherence to healthy diet seems to be associated with specific FA that reduce risk of CVD.
  • Karhula, Kati; Harma, Mikko; Sallinen, Mikael; Lindholm, Harri; Hirvonen, Ari; Elovainio, Marko; Kivimaki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Puttonen, Sampsa (2016)
    Although the prevalence of work-related stress has increased, knowledge on the contributions of that stress to long-term adverse health effects is still lacking. Stress biomarkers can reveal early signs of negative health effects, but no previous studies have measured both acute stress reactions and long-term exposure to job strain using both salivary cortisol and -amylase (AA). The present study examines the association between job strain and these biomarkers among shift-working female health care professionals in the laboratory and the field. The 95 participants were recruited from hospital wards categorized in either the top (high job strain [HJS] group, n = 42) or the bottom quartile of job strain (low job strain [LJS] group, n = 53), as rated by survey responses. Participants' self-perceived job strain was at least as high or low as the ward's average estimation. Saliva samples were collected during the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), preselected morning and night shifts, and a day off. There was a larger increase in the cortisol concentration of participants in the HJS than in the LJS group (2.27- vs. 1.48-fold, respectively, nonsignificant) during the TSST. Participants in the HJS group also had higher salivary AA levels 30 min after awakening on the morning-shift day than those in the LJS group (p = .02), whereas the salivary cortisol awakening response on the day off was higher in the LJS group (p = .05, education as a covariate). The remaining stress-biomarker results did not differ significantly between groups. These data suggest that HJS in shift-working health care professionals is weakly associated with changes in stress biomarkers.
  • Jelenkovic, Aline; Yokoyama, Yoshie; Sund, Reijo; Hur, Yoon-Mi; Harris, Jennifer R.; Brandt, Ingunn; Nilsen, Thomas Sevenius; Ooki, Syuichi; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; Almqvist, Catarina; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Saudino, Kimberly J.; Stazi, Maria A.; Fagnani, Corrado; Brescianini, Sonia; Nelson, Tracy L.; Whitfield, Keith E.; Knafo-Noam, Ariel; Mankuta, David; Abramson, Lior; Cutler, Tessa L.; Hopper, John L.; Llewellyn, Clare H.; Fisher, Abigail; Corley, Robin P.; Huibregtse, Brooke M.; Derom, Catherine A.; Vlietinck, Robert F.; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Morten; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Sodemann, Morten; Krueger, Robert F.; McGue, Matt; Pahlen, Shandell; Alexandra Burt, S.; Klump, Kelly L.; Dubois, Lise; Boivin, Michel; Brendgen, Mara; Dionne, Ginette; Vitaro, Frank; Willemsen, Gonneke; Bartels, Meike; van Beijsterveld, Catharina E.M.; Craig, Jeffrey M.; Heikkilä, Kauko; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Ning, Feng; Kaprio, Jaakko; Silventoinen, Karri (2018)
    Background: There is evidence that birth size is positively associated with height in later life, but it remains unclear whether this is explained by genetic factors or the intrauterine environment. Aim: To analyze the associations of birth weight, length and ponderal index with height from infancy through adulthood within mono- and dizygotic twin pairs, which provides insights into the role of genetic and environmental individual-specific factors. Methods: This study is based on the data from 28 twin cohorts in 17 countries. The pooled data included 41,852 complete twin pairs (55% monozygotic and 45% same-sex dizygotic) with information on birth weight and a total of 112,409 paired height measurements at ages ranging from 1 to 69 years. Birth length was available for 19,881 complete twin pairs, with a total of 72,692 paired height measurements. The association between birth size and later height was analyzed at both the individual and within-pair level by linear regression analyses. Results: Within twin pairs, regression coefficients showed that a 1-kg increase in birth weight and a 1-cm increase in birth length were associated with 1.14-4.25 cm and 0.18-0.90 cm taller height, respectively. The magnitude of the associations was generally greater within dizygotic than within monozygotic twin pairs, and this difference between zygosities was more pronounced for birth length. Conclusion: Both genetic and individual-specific environmental factors play a role in the association between birth size and later height from infancy to adulthood, with a larger role for genetics in the association with birth length than with birth weight.
  • Girchenko, Polina; Lahti, Jari; Czamara, Darina; Knight, Anna K.; Jones, Meaghan J.; Suarez Figueiredo, Anna; Hämäläinen, Esa; Kajantie, Eero; Laivuori, Hannele; Villa, Pia M.; Reynolds, Rebecca M.; Kobor, Michael S.; Smith, Alicia K.; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Räikkönen, Katri (2017)
    Background: A recent study has shown that it is possible to accurately estimate gestational age (GA) at birth from the DNA methylation (DNAm) of fetal umbilical cord blood/newborn blood spots. This DNAm GA predictor may provide additional information relevant to developmental stage. In 814 mother-neonate pairs, we evaluated the associations between DNAm GA and a number of maternal and offspring characteristics. These characteristics reflect prenatal environmental adversity and are expected to influence newborn developmental stage. Results: DNAm GA acceleration (GAA; i.e., older DNAm GA than chronological GA) of the offspring at birth was associated with maternal age of over 40 years at delivery, pre-eclampsia and fetal demise in a previous pregnancy, maternal pre-eclampsia and treatment with antenatal betamethasone in the index pregnancy, lower neonatal birth size, lower 1-min Apgar score, and female sex. DNAm GA deceleration (GAD; i.e., younger DNAm GA than chronological GA) of the offspring at birth was associated with insulin-treated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a previous pregnancy and Sjogren's syndrome. These findings were more accentuated when the DNAm GA calculation was based on the raw difference between DNAm GA and GA than on the residual from the linear regression of DNAm GA on GA. Conclusions: Our findings show that variations in the DNAm GA of the offspring at birth are associated with a number of maternal and offspring characteristics known to reflect exposure to prenatal environmental adversity. Future studies should be aimed at determining if this biological variation is predictive of developmental adversity.
  • Strandberg, T. E.; von Bonsdorff, M.; Strandberg, A.; Pitkala, K.; Raikkonen, K. (2017)
    Introduction: There are few longitudinal studies of relationships between vacation and later health outcomes. We studied these during a 26-year follow-up of the Helsinki Businessmen Study. Methods: In 1974, at mean age of 47 years, 2741 members of a cohort of executives and businessmen born 1919-1934 were clinically examined and reported their annual vacation time (dichotomized >21 [n = 2001]vs. Results: At baseline, shorter vacation was associated with longer work time, higher BMI, more coffee consumption and worse SRH. During the 26-year follow-up, 778 men out of 2741 (28.4%) had died. Shorter annual vacation was associated with higher mortality with curves starting to diverge after 18 years of follow-up, (fully adjusted hazard ratio 1.29, 95% confidence interval 1.08-1.55, P = 0.005). In old age, shorter vacation in midlife was tentatively associated with worse general health. Conclusions: Shorter vacation time in midlife was associated with characteristics related to lifestyle and with worse perceived health status, and predicted mortality up to old age in men. (C) 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS and European Union Geriatric Medicine Society. All rights reserved.
  • Haapanen, Markus J.; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B.; Fisher, Diana; Jonasson, Fridbert; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cotch, Mary Frances (2020)
    Purpose To study associations between body size at birth and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in old age. Methods The study sample consists of 1497 community-dwelling individuals (56.1% women) aged 67-89 years with birth data and retinal data collected twice in old age 5 years apart. Birth data (weight, length, birth order) were extracted from original birth records. Digital retinal photographs were graded to determine AMD status. Data on covariates were collected at the baseline physical examination in old age. Multivariable regression analyses were used to study the association between birth data and AMD adjusting for known confounding factors, including birth year cohort effects. Results The prevalence and 5-year incidence of any AMD were 33.1% and 17.0%, respectively. Men and women born in 1930-1936 were significantly leaner and slightly longer at birth compared to those in earlier birth cohorts. There were no consistent associations between weight, length or ponderal index (PI) at birth and AMD in old age even when stratified by birth cohort. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) prevalence (39.8%) and 5-year incidence (28.6%) were highest in individuals who were in the highest quartile of PI at birth and who were obese in old age. Conclusion Body size at birth was not consistently associated with AMD in old age, suggesting that intrauterine growth might have little direct importance in the development of AMD in old age. It is possible that some yet unknown factors related to larger size at birth and obesity in old age may explain differences in the prevalence and incidence of AMD in the ageing population.
  • Perala, Mia-Maria; Mannisto, Satu; Kaartinen, Niina E.; Kajantie, Eero; Osmond, Clive; Barker, David J. P.; Valsta, Liisa M.; Eriksson, Johan G. (2012)
  • Cano, Antonio; Chedraui, Peter; Goulis, Dimitrios G.; Lopes, Patrice; Mishra, Gita; Mueck, Alfred; Senturk, Levent M.; Simoncini, Tommaso; Stevenson, John C.; Stute, Petra; Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Rees, Margaret; Lambrinoudaki, Irene (2018)
    Introduction: Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a highly prevalent disease. Prevention through lifestyle measures includes an adequate calcium intake. Despite the guidance provided by scientific societies and governmental bodies worldwide, many issues remain unresolved. Aims: To provide evidence regarding the impact of calcium intake on the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and critically appraise current guidelines. Materials and methods: Literature review and consensus of expert opinion. Results and conclusion: The recommended daily intake of calcium varies between 700 and 1200 mg of elemental calcium, depending on the endorsing source. Although calcium can be derived either from the diet or supplements, the former source is preferred. Intake below the recommended amount may increase fragility fracture risk; however, there is no consistent evidence that calcium supplementation at, or above, recommended levels reduces risk. The addition of vitamin D may minimally reduce fractures, mainly among institutionalised people. Excessive intake of calcium, defined as higher than 2000 mg/day, can be potentially harmful. Some studies demonstrated harm even at lower dosages. An increased risk for cardiovascular events, urolithiasis and even fractures has been found in association with excessive calcium intake, but this issue remains unresolved. In conclusion, an adequate intake of calcium is recommended for general bone health. Excessive calcium intake seems of no benefit, and could possibly be harmful.
  • Junttila, Ilkka S.; Vuorio, Alpo; Budowle, Bruce; Laukkala, Tanja; Sajantila, Antti (2018)
    Diabetes mellitus (DM) could cause pilot incapacitation and result in aviation fatalities. The mechanisms could be directly as a consequence of acute hypoglycemia/subacute diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or indirectly as an acute cardiovascular event by contributing to the development of atherosclerosis in coronary or carotid and cerebral arteries. In this study, DM-related fatal flight accidents in the US National Transport Bureau's database between years 2011-2016 were analyzed with special emphasis on postmortem (PM) glucose levels and correlation of toxicological reports with anamnestic information on DM. Additionally, autopsy results on coronary arteries were reviewed. In 43 out of 1491 (similar to 3%) fatal accidents pilots had DM. Postmortem glucose or glycated hemoglobin percentage (Hb1Ac) was measured in 12 of the 43 cases; while antidiabetic medication was found in 14 of the cases (only two of the cases had both glucose measurements and medication). With the increasing prevalence of DM, a possibility of pilot incapacitation due to DM or complications of DM should be actively studied, even if no anamnestic information of DM was available. While PM hypoglycemia is difficult to assess, we propose a systematic investigation based on measurement of glucose, Hb1Ac%, and ketone bodies, and documentation of atherosclerotic lesions in major arteries to identify or rule out DM as a cause of pilot incapacitation.
  • Leskinen, Tuija; Stenholm, Sari; Heinonen, Olli J.; Pulakka, Anna; Aalto, Ville; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi (2018)
    This study aims to examine the association between change in physical activity over time and accumulation of cardiometabolic risk factors. Four consecutive surveys (Time 1 to 4) were conducted with 4-year intervals in 1997-2013 (the Finnish Public Sector study). Physical activity of 15,634 cardio-metabolically healthy participants (mean age 43.3 (SD 8.7) years, 85% women) was assessed using four-item survey measure and was expressed as weekly metabolic equivalent (MET) hours in Time 1, 2, and 3. At each time point, participants were categorised into low (<14 MET-h/week), moderate (>= 14 to<30 MET-h/week), or high (>= 30MET-h/week) activity level and change in physical activity levels between Time 1 and 3 (over 8 years) was determined. The outcome was the number of incident cardiometabolic risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and obesity) at Time 4. Cumulative logistic regression was used for data analysis. Compared to maintenance of low physical activity, increase in physical activity from low baseline activity level was associated with decreased accumulation of cardiometabolic risk factors in a dose-response manner (cumulative odds ratio [cOR]= 0.73, 95% CI 0.59-0.90 for low-to-moderate and cOR= 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.89 for low-to-high, P for trend 0.0007). Decrease in physical activity level from high to low was associated with increased accumulation of cardiometabolic risk factors (cOR= 1.60, 95% CI 1.27-2.01) compared to those who remained at high activity level. Thus even a modest long-term increase in physical activity was associated with reduction in cardiometabolic risk whereas decrease in physical activity was related to increased risk.