Browsing by Subject "COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS"

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  • Pihajoki, Pauli (2017)
    We propose a new mathematical model for n - k-dimensional non-linear correlations with intrinsic scatter in n-dimensional data. The model is based on Riemannian geometry and is naturally symmetric with respect to the measured variables and invariant under coordinate transformations. We combine the model with a Bayesian approach for estimating the parameters of the correlation relation and the intrinsic scatter. A side benefit of the approach is that censored and truncated data sets and independent, arbitrary measurement errors can be incorporated. We also derive analytic likelihoods for the typical astrophysical use case of linear relations in n-dimensional Euclidean space. We pay particular attention to the case of linear regression in two dimensions and compare our results to existing methods. Finally, we apply our methodology to the well-known MBH-s correlation between the mass of a supermassive black hole in the centre of a galactic bulge and the corresponding bulge velocity dispersion. The main result of our analysis is that the most likely slope of this correlation is similar to 6 for the data sets used, rather than the values in the range of similar to 4-5 typically quoted in the literature for these data.
  • Schewtschenko, J. A.; Baugh, C. M.; Wilkinson, R. J.; Boehm, C.; Pascoli, S.; Sawala, T. (2016)
    In the thermal dark matter (DM) paradigm, primordial interactions between DM and Standard Model particles are responsible for the observed DM relic density. In Boehm et al., we showed that weak-strength interactions between DM and radiation (photons or neutrinos) can erase small-scale density fluctuations, leading to a suppression of the matter power spectrum compared to the collisionless cold DM (CDM) model. This results in fewer DM subhaloes within Milky Way-like DM haloes, implying a reduction in the abundance of satellite galaxies. Here we use very high-resolution N-body simulations to measure the dynamics of these subhaloes. We find that when interactions are included, the largest subhaloes are less concentrated than their counterparts in the collisionless CDM model and have rotation curves that match observational data, providing a new solution to the 'too big to fail' problem.
  • McAlpine, Stuart; Harrison, Chris M.; Rosario, David J.; Alexander, David M.; Ellison, Sara L.; Johansson, Peter H.; Patton, David R. (2020)
    We investigate the connection between galaxy-galaxy mergers and enhanced black hole (BH) growth using the cosmological hydrodynamical EAGLE simulation. We do this via three methods of analysis, investigating: the merger fraction of AGN, the AGN fraction of merging systems, and the AGN fraction of galaxies with close companions. In each case, we find an increased abundance of AGN within merging systems relative to control samples of inactive or isolated galaxies (by up to a factor of approximate to 3 depending on the analysis method used), confirming that mergers are enhancing BH accretion rates for at least a subset of the galaxy population. The greatest excess of AGN triggered via a merger are found in lower mass (M-* similar to 10(10) M-circle dot) gas rich (f(gas) > 0.2) central galaxies with lower mass BHs (M-BH similar to 10(7) M-circle dot) at lower redshifts (z <1). We find no enhancement of AGN triggered via mergers in more massive galaxies (M-* greater than or similar to 10(11) M-circle dot). The enhancement of AGN is not uniform throughout the phases of a merger, and instead peaks within the early remnants of merging systems (typically lagging approximate to 300 Myr post-coalescence of the two galaxies at z = 0.5). We argue that neither major (M-*,M-1/M-*,M-2 = 1/4) nor minor mergers (1/10 <M-*,M-1/M-*,M-2 <1/4) are statistically relevant for enhancing BH masses globally. Whilst at all redshifts the galaxies experiencing a merger have accretion rates that are on average 2-3 times that of isolated galaxies, the majority of mass that is accreted on to BHs occurs outside the periods of a merger. We compute that on average no more than 15 per cent of a BHs final day mass comes from the enhanced accretion rates triggered via a merger.
  • Beltran Almeida, Juan P.; Bernal, Nicolas; Rubio, Javier; Tenkanen, Tommi (2019)
    If cosmic inflation was driven by an electrically neutral scalar field stable on cosmological time scales, the field necessarily constitutes all or part of dark matter (DM). We study this possibility in a scenario where the inflaton field s resides in a hidden sector, which is coupled to the Standard Model sector through the Higgs portal lambda(hs)s(2) (HH)-H-dagger and non-minimally to gravity via xi(s)s(2)R. We study scenarios where the field s first drives inflation, then reheats the Universe, and later constitutes all DM. We consider two benchmark scenarios where the DM abundance is generated either by production during reheating or via non-thermal freeze-in. In both cases, we take into account all production channels relevant for DM in the mass range from keV to PeV scale. On the inflationary side, we compare the dynamics and the relevant observables in two different but well-motivated theories of gravity (metric and Palatini), discuss multi field effects in case both fields (s and h) were dynamical during inflation, and take into account the non-perturbative nature of particle production during reheating. We find that, depending on the initial conditions for inflation, couplings and the DM mass, the scenario works well especially for large DM masses, 10(2) GeV less than or similar to m(s) less than or similar to 10(6) GeV, although there are also small observationally allowed windows at the keV and MeV scales. We discuss how the model can be tested through astrophysical observations.
  • Heikinheimo, Matti; Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo; Vaskonen, Ville (2016)
    We consider an extension of the Standard Model with a singlet sector consisting of a real ( pseudo) scalar and a Dirac fermion coupled with the Standard Model only via the scalar portal. We assume that the portal coupling is weak enough for the singlet sector not to thermalize with the Standard Model allowing the production of singlet particles via the freeze-in mechanism. If the singlet sector interacts with itself sufficiently strongly, it may thermalize within itself, resulting in dark matter abundance determined by the freeze-out mechanism operating within the singlet sector. We investigate this scenario in detail. In particular, we show that requiring the absence of inflationary isocurvature fluctuations provides lower bounds on the magnitude of the dark sector self-interactions and in parts of the parameter space favors sufficiently large self-couplings, supported also by the features observed in the small-scale structure formation.
  • Rantala, Antti; Pihajoki, Pauli; Johansson, Peter H.; Naab, Thorsten; Lahen, Natalia; Sawala, Till (2017)
    We present KETJU, a new extension of the widely used smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation code GADGET-3. The key feature of the code is the inclusion of algorithmically regularized regions around every supermassive black hole (SMBH). This allows for simultaneously following global galactic-scale dynamical and astrophysical processes, while solving the dynamics of SMBHs, SMBH binaries, and surrounding stellar systems at subparsec scales. The KETJU code includes post-Newtonian terms in the equations of motions of the SMBHs, which enables a new SMBH merger criterion based on the gravitational wave coalescence timescale, pushing the merger separation of SMBHs down to similar to 0.005 pc. We test the performance of our code by comparison to NBODY7 and rVINE. We set up dynamically stable multicomponent merger progenitor galaxies to study the SMBH binary evolution during galaxy mergers. In our simulation sample the SMBH binaries do not suffer from the final-parsec problem, which we attribute to the nonspherical shape of the merger remnants. For bulge-only models, the hardening rate decreases with increasing resolution, whereas for models that in addition include massive dark matter halos, the SMBH binary hardening rate becomes practically independent of the mass resolution of the stellar bulge. The SMBHs coalesce on average 200 Myr after the formation of the SMBH binary. However, small differences in the initial SMBH binary eccentricities can result in large differences in the SMBH coalescence times. Finally, we discuss the future prospects of KETJU, which allows for a straightforward inclusion of gas physics in the simulations.
  • Sawala, Till; Pihajoki, Pauli; Johansson, Peter H.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Navarro, Julio F.; Oman, Kyle A.; White, Simon D. M. (2017)
    The predicted abundance and properties of the low-mass substructures embedded inside larger dark matter haloes differ sharply among alternative dark matter models. Too small to host galaxies themselves, these subhaloes may still be detected via gravitational lensing or via perturbations of the Milky Way's globular cluster streams and its stellar disc. Here, we use the APOSTLE cosmological simulations to predict the abundance and the spatial and velocity distributions of subhaloes in the range 10(6.5)-10(8.5)M(circle dot) inside haloes of mass similar to 10(12) M-circle dot in Lambda cold dark matter. Although these subhaloes are themselves devoid of baryons, we find that baryonic effects are important. Compared to corresponding dark matter only simulations, the loss of baryons from subhaloes and stronger tidal disruption due to the presence of baryons near the centre of the main halo reduce the number of subhaloes by similar to 1/4 to 1/2, independently of subhalo mass, but increasingly towards the host halo centre. We also find that subhaloes have non-Maxwellian orbital velocity distributions, with centrally rising velocity anisotropy and positive velocity bias that reduces the number of low-velocity subhaloes, particularly near the halo centre. We parametrize the predicted population of subhaloes in terms of mass, galactocentric distance and velocities. We discuss implications of our results for the prospects of detecting dark matter substructures and for possible inferences about the nature of dark matter.
  • Cautun, Marius; Deason, Alis J.; Frenk, Carlos S.; McAlpine, Stuart (2019)
    The Milky Way (MW) offers a uniquely detailed view of galactic structure and is often regarded as a prototypical spiral galaxy. But recent observations indicate that the MW is atypical: it has an undersized supermassive black hole at its centre; it is surrounded by a very low mass, excessively metal-poor stellar halo; and it has an unusually large nearby satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Here, we show that the LMC is on a collision course with the MW with which it will merge in 2.4(-0.8)(+1.2) Gyr (68 per cent confidence level). This catastrophic and long-overdue event will restore the MW to normality. Using the EAGLE galaxy formation simulation, we show that, as a result of the merger, the central supermassive black hole will increase in mass by up to a factor of 8. The Galactic stellar halo will undergo an equally impressive transformation, becoming 5 times more massive. The additional stars will come predominantly from the disrupted LMC, but a sizeable number will be ejected on to the halo from the stellar disc. The post-merger stellar halo will have the median metallicity of the LMC, [Fe/H] = -0.5 dex, which is typical of other galaxies of similar mass to the MW. At the end of this exceptional event, the MW will become a true benchmark for spiral galaxies, at least temporarily.
  • Sawala, Till; Frenk, Carlos S.; Fattahi, Azadeh; Navarro, Julio F.; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Furlong, Michelle; Helly, John. C.; Jenkins, Adrian; Oman, Kyle A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; Trayford, James; White, Simon D. M. (2016)
    The Local Group galaxies offer some of the most discriminating tests of models of cosmic structure formation. For example, observations of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda satellite populations appear to be in disagreement with N-body simulations of the 'lambda cold dark matter' (I > CDM) model: there are far fewer satellite galaxies than substructures in CDM haloes (the 'missing satellites' problem); dwarf galaxies seem to avoid the most massive substructures (the 'too-big-to-fail' problem); and the brightest satellites appear to orbit their host galaxies on a thin plane (the 'planes of satellites' problem). Here we present results from apostle (A Project Of Simulating The Local Environment), a suite of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of 12 volumes selected to match the kinematics of the Local Group (LG) members. Applying the eagle code to the LG environment, we find that our simulations match the observed abundance of LG galaxies, including the satellite galaxies of the MW and Andromeda. Due to changes to the structure of haloes and the evolution in the LG environment, the simulations reproduce the observed relation between stellar mass and velocity dispersion of individual dwarf spheroidal galaxies without necessitating the formation of cores in their dark matter profiles. Satellite systems form with a range of spatial anisotropies, including one similar to the MWs, confirming that such a configuration is not unexpected in I > CDM. Finally, based on the observed velocity dispersion, size, and stellar mass, we provide estimates of the maximum circular velocity for the haloes of nine MW dwarf spheroidals.
  • Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Naab, Thorsten; Burkert, Andreas; Hirschmann, Michaela; Hoffmann, Tadziu L.; Johansson, Peter H. (2017)
    We present evidence from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations for a co-evolution of the slope of the total (dark and stellar) mass density profile, gamma (tot), and the dark matter fraction within the half-mass radius, f(DM), in early-type galaxies. The relation can be described as gamma(tot) = A f(DM) + B for all systems at all redshifts. The trend is set by the decreasing importance of gas dissipation towards lower redshifts and for more massive systems. Early-type galaxies are smaller, more concentrated, have lower f(DM) and steeper gamma(tot) at high redshifts and at lower masses for a given redshift; f(DM) and gamma(tot) are good indicators for growth by 'dry' merging. The values for A and B change distinctively for different feedback models, and this relation can be used as a test for such models. A similar correlation exists between gamma(tot) and the stellar mass surface density Sigma(*). A model with weak stellar feedback and feedback from black holes is in best agreement with observations. All simulations, independent of the assumed feedback model, predict steeper gamma(tot) and lower f(DM) at higher redshifts. While the latter is in agreement with the observed trends, the former is in conflict with lensing observations, which indicate constant or decreasing gamma(tot). This discrepancy is shown to be artificial: the observed trends can be reproduced from the simulations using observational methodology to calculate the total density slopes.
  • Genina, Anna; Benitez-Llambay, Alejandro; Frenk, Carlos S.; Cole, Shaun; Fattahi, Azadeh; Navarro, Julio F.; Oman, Kyle A.; Sawala, Till; Theuns, Tom (2018)
    The existence of two kinematically and chemically distinct stellar subpopulations in the Sculptor and Fornax dwarf galaxies offers the opportunity to constrain the density profile of their matter haloes by measuring the mass contained within the well-separated half-light radii of the two metallicity subpopulations. Walker and Penarrubia have used this approach to argue that data for these galaxies are consistent with constant-density 'cores' in their inner regions and rule out 'cuspy' Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profiles with high statistical significance, particularly in the case of Sculptor. We test the validity of these claims using dwarf galaxies in the APOSTLE (A Project Of Simulating The Local Environment) Lambda cold dark matter cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of analogues of the Local Group. These galaxies all have NFW dark matter density profiles and a subset of them develop two distinct metallicity subpopulations reminiscent of Sculptor and Fornax. We apply a method analogous to that of Walker and Penarrubia to a sample of 50 simulated dwarfs and find that this procedure often leads to a statistically significant detection of a core in the profile when in reality there is a cusp. Although multiple factors contribute to these failures, the main cause is a violation of the assumption of spherical symmetry upon which the mass estimators are based. The stellar populations of the simulated dwarfs tend to be significantly elongated and, in several cases, the two metallicity populations have different asphericity and are misaligned. As a result, a wide range of slopes of the density profile are inferred depending on the angle from which the galaxy is viewed.
  • Bernal, Nicolas; Heikinheimo, Matti; Tenkanen, Tommi; Tuominen, Kimmo; Vaskonen, Ville (2017)
    We present an overview of scenarios where the observed Dark Matter (DM) abundance consists of Feebly Interacting Massive Particles (FIMPs), produced nonthermally by the so-called freeze-in mechanism. In contrast to the usual freeze-out scenario, frozen-in FIMP DM interacts very weakly with the particles in the visible sector and never attained thermal equilibrium with the baryon-photon fluid in the early Universe. Instead of being determined by its annihilation strength, the DM abundance depends on the decay and annihilation strengths of particles in equilibrium with the baryon-photon fluid, as well as couplings in the DM sector. This makes frozen-in DM very difficult but not impossible to test. In this review, we present the freeze-in mechanism and its variations considered in the literature (dark freeze-out and reannihilation), compare them to the standard DM freeze-out scenario, discuss several aspects of model building, and pay particular attention to observational properties and general testability of such feebly interacting DM.
  • Schaller, Matthieu; Frenk, Carlos S.; Fattahi, Azadeh; Navarro, Julio F.; Oman, Kyle A.; Sawala, Till (2016)
    We investigate the presence and importance of dark matter discs in a sample of 24 simulated Milky Way galaxies in the APOSTLE project, part of the EAGLE programme of hydrodynamic simulations in Lambda CDM cosmology. It has been suggested that a dark disc in the Milky Way may boost the dark matter density and modify the velocity modulus relative to a smooth halo at the position of the Sun, with ramifications for direct detection experiments. From a kinematic decomposition of the dark matter and a real space analysis of all 24 haloes, we find that only one of the simulated Milky Way analogues has a detectable dark disc component. This unique event was caused by a merger at late time with an LMC-mass satellite at very low grazing angle. Considering that even this rare scenario only enhances the dark matter density at the solar radius by 35 per cent and affects the high-energy tail of the dark matter velocity distribution by less than 1 per cent, we conclude that the presence of a dark disc in the Milky Way is unlikely, and is very unlikely to have a significant effect on direct detection experiments.
  • Sales, Laura V.; Navarro, Julio F.; Oman, Kyle; Fattahi, Azadeh; Ferrero, Ismael; Abadi, Mario; Bower, Richard; Crain, Robert A.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Sawala, Till; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; White, Simon D. M. (2017)
    The scaling of disc galaxy rotation velocity with baryonic mass (the 'baryonic Tully-Fisher' relation, BTF) has long confounded galaxy formation models. It is steeper than the M proportional to V-3 scaling relating halo virial masses and circular velocities and its zero-point implies that galaxies comprise a very small fraction of available baryons. Such low galaxy formation efficiencies may, in principle, be explained by winds driven by evolving stars, but the tightness of the BTF relation argues against the substantial scatter expected from such a vigorous feedback mechanism. We use the APOSTLE/EAGLE simulations to show that the BTF relation is well reproduced in Lambda cold dark matter (CDM) simulations that match the size and number of galaxies as a function of stellar mass. In such models, galaxy rotation velocities are proportional to halo virial velocity and the steep velocity-mass dependence results from the decline in galaxy formation efficiency with decreasing halo mass needed to reconcile the CDM halo mass function with the galaxy luminosity function. The scatter in the simulated BTF is smaller than observed, even when considering all simulated galaxies and not just rotationally supported ones. The simulations predict that the BTF should become increasingly steep at the faint end, although the velocity scatter at fixed mass should remain small. Observed galaxies with rotation speeds below similar to 40 km s(-1) seem to deviate from this prediction. We discuss observational biases and modelling uncertainties that may help to explain this disagreement in the context of Lambda CDM models of dwarf galaxy formation.
  • Wang, M. -Y.; Fattahi, Azadeh; Cooper, Andrew P.; Sawala, Till; Strigari, Louis E.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Navarro, Julio F.; Oman, Kyle; Schaller, Matthieu (2017)
    We use the APOSTLE (A Project Of Simulating The Local Environment) cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to examine the effects of tidal stripping on cold dark matter subhaloes that host three of the most luminous Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies: Fornax, Sculptor and Leo I. We identify simulated satellites that match the observed spatial and kinematic distributions of stars in these galaxies, and track their evolution after infall. We find similar to 30 per cent of subhaloes hosting satellites with present-day stellar mass 10(6)-10(8) M-circle dot experience >20 per cent stellar mass-loss after infall. Fornax analogues have earlier infall times compared to Sculptor and Leo I analogues. Star formation in Fornax analogues continues for similar to 3-6 Gyr after infall, whereas Sculptor and Leo I analogues stop forming stars