Browsing by Subject "Capsicum"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-1 of 1
  • Kilpiö, Tommi (Helsingin yliopisto, 2021)
    Plant cell culture can be used for the production of valuable secondary metabolites. Inspired by the previous studies focusing on capsaicinoid production, this study aimed for establishing plant cell cultures of Capsicum chinense to produce capsinoids. Capsinoids are non-pungent capsaicinoid analogues with potential health benefits. Another aim of this study was to determine the α-solanine content in Capsicum plants and cell cultures to ensure that no toxic amounts are formed during the cell culture. Cell cultures of non-pungent Capsicum chinense cultivars, Trinidad Pimento and Aji Dulce strain 2, were established, and the cultures were fed with intermediates, vanillin and vanillyl alcohol, to enhance the production. In addition, cell cultures of extremely pungent Trinidad Scorpion cultivar were established and they were fed with vanillyl alcohol to study if this would result in formation of capsinoids instead of capsaicinoids. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with UV detection was validated for determining the capsiate contents of the cell culture samples and fruit samples for comparison. To analyze the α-solanine content of the cell culture samples and leaves and flowers of three cultivars belonging to three different Capsicum species, an HPLC-UV method was validated for this purpose as well. Despite validating a sensitive and specific method for capsiate analysis, no detectable amounts of capsiate were detected in any of the cell culture samples. Cell cultures of pungent cultivars did not produce detectable amounts of capsaicinoids either. Results from analyzing the real fruit samples were in accordance with previous literature reports, and Aji Dulce fruits were found to contain higher amounts of capsiate compared to Trinidad Pimento, although having only one indoor grown Aji Dulce fruit analyzed limits the reliability. The analytical method for determining α-solanine content had problems with internal standard and specificity. This method could be used for making rough estimates about the possible α-solanine content. No hazardous amounts were detected in any of the cell culture samples. Only one sample consisting of Aji Dulce young leaves could contain α-solanine slightly above the limits set for commercial potatoes. Results with flowers of Rocoto San Pedro Orange (C. pubescens) and Aji Omnicolor (C. baccatum) were inconclusive and it couldn’t be ruled out that they might contain large amounts of α-solanine. The reason why capsinoids, or even capsaicinoids, were not detected in the cell culture samples remains unsolved, but it could be speculated that capsinoids might degrade in the cell culture environment or that selection of cultivar or cell line is critical. This study gave further proof to the previous assumptions that chili leaves are safe and should not contain notable amounts of α-solanine.