Browsing by Subject "Cardiac arrest"

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  • Böttiger, B. W.; Lockey, A.; Aickin, R.; Castren, M.; de Caen, A.; Escalante, R.; Kern, K. B.; Lim, S. H.; Nadkarni, V.; Neumar, R. W.; Nolan, J. P.; Stanton, D.; Wang, T. -L.; Perkins, G. D. (2018)
    "All citizens of the world can save a life". With these words, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) is launching the first global initiative - World Restart a Heart (WRAH) - to increase public awareness and therefore the rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for victims of cardiac arrest. In most of the cases, it takes too long for the emergency services to arrive on scene after the victim's collapse. Thus, the most effective way to increase survival and favourable outcome in cardiac arrest by two-to fourfold is early CPR by lay bystanders and by "first responders". Lay bystander resuscitation rates, however, differ significantly across the world, ranging from 5 to 80%. If all countries could have high lay bystander resuscitation rates, this would help to save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. In order to achieve this goal, all seven ILCOR councils have agreed to participate in WRAH 2018. Besides schoolchildren education in CPR ("KIDS SAVE LIVES"), many other initiatives have already been developed in different parts of the world. ILCOR is keen for the WRAH initiative to be as inclusive as possible, and that it should happen every year on 16 October or as close to that day as possible. Besides recommending CPR training for children and adults, it is hoped that a unified global message will enable our policy makers to take action to address the inequalities in patient survival around the world.
  • Kirkegaard, Hans; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Pettilä, Ville; Hjort, Jakob; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; de Haas, Inge; Nielsen, Jorgen Feldbaek; Ilkjaer, Susanne; Kaltoft, Anne; Jeppesen, Anni Norgaard; Grejs, Anders Morten; Duez, Christophe Henri Valdemar; Larsen, Alf Inge; Toome, Valdo; Arus, Urmet; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Storm, Christian; Laitio, Timo; Skrifvars, Markus; Soreide, Eldar (2016)
    Background: The TTH48 trial aims to determine whether prolonged duration (48 hours) of targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33 (+/- 1) degrees C results in better neurological outcomes compared to standard duration (24 hours) after six months in comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Methods: TTH48 is an investigator-initiated, multicentre, assessor-blinded, randomised, controlled superiority trial of 24 and 48 hours of TTM at 33 (+/- 1) degrees C performed in 355 comatose OHCA patients aged 18 to 80 years who were admitted to ten intensive care units (ICUs) in six Northern European countries. The primary outcome of the study is the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score observed at six months after cardiac arrest. CPC scores of 1 and 2 are defined as good neurological outcomes, and CPC scores of 3, 4 and 5 are defined as poor neurological outcomes. The secondary outcomes are as follows: mortality within six months after cardiac arrest, CPC at hospital discharge, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on day 4, length of stay in ICU and at hospital and the presence of any adverse events such as cerebral, circulatory, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal, metabolic measures, infection or bleeding. With the planned sample size, we have 80% power to detect a 15% improvement in good neurological outcomes at a two-sided statistical significance level of 5%. Discussion: We present a detailed statistical analysis protocol (SAP) that specifies how primary and secondary outcomes should be evaluated. We also predetermine covariates for adjusted analyses and pre-specify sub-groups for sensitivity analyses. This pre-planned SAP will reduce analysis bias and add validity to the findings of this trial on the effect of length of TTM on important clinical outcomes after cardiac arrest.
  • Haywood, Kirstie L.; Pearson, Nathan; Morrison, Laurie J.; Castren, Maaret; Lilja, Gisela; Perkins, Gavin D. (2018)
    Aim: High quality evidence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) can measure the long-term impact of CA. The aim of this study was to critically appraise the evidence of psychometric quality and acceptability of measures used in the assessment of HRQoL in cardiac arrest survivors. Methods: Systematic literature searches (2004-2017) and named author searches to identify articles pertaining to the measurement of HRQoL. Data on study quality, measurement and practical properties were extracted and assessed against international standards. Results: From 356 reviewed abstracts, 69 articles were assessed in full. 25 provided evidence for 10 measures of HRQoL: one condition-specific; three generic profile measures; two generic index; and four utility measures. Although limited, evidence for measurement validity was strongest for the HUI3 and SF-36. However, evidence for reliability, content validity, responsiveness and interpretability and acceptability was generally limited or not available in the CA population for all measures. Conclusions: This review has demonstrated that a measure of quality of life specific to OHCA survivors is not available. Limited evidence of validity exists for one utility measure - the HUI3 - and a generic profile - the SF-36. Robust evidence of the quality and acceptability of HRQoL measures in OHCA was limited or not available. Future collaborative research must seek to urgently establish the relevance and acceptability of these measures to OHCA survivors, to establish robust evidence of essential measurement and practical properties over the short and long-term, and to inform future HRQoL assessment in the OHCA population. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Bäcklund, Minna; Efendijev, Ilmar; Raj, Rahul; Folger, Daniel; Litonius, Erik; Laitio, Ruut; Bendel, Stepani; Hoppu, Sanna; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Reinikainen, Matti; Skrifvars, Markus B. (2019)
    BackgroundOrgan dysfunction is common after cardiac arrest and associated with worse short-term outcome, but its impact on long-term outcome and treatment costs is unknown.MethodsWe used nationwide registry data from the intensive care units (ICU) of the five Finnish university hospitals to evaluate the association of 24-h extracerebral Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (24h-EC-SOFA) score with 1-year survival and healthcare-associated costs after cardiac arrest. We included adult cardiac arrest patients treated in the participating ICUs between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013. We acquired the confirmed date of death from the Finnish Population Register Centre database and gross 1-year healthcare-associated costs from the hospital billing records and the database of the Finnish Social Insurance Institution.ResultsA total of 5814 patients were included in the study, and 2401 were alive 1year after cardiac arrest. Median (interquartile range (IQR)) 24h-EC-SOFA score was 6 (5-8) in 1-year survivors and 7 (5-10) in non-survivors. In multivariate regression analysis, adjusting for age and prior independency in self-care, the 24h-EC-SOFA score had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.16 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-1.18) per point for 1-year mortality.Median (IQR) healthcare-associated costs in the year after cardiac arrest were Euro47,000 (Euro28,000-75,000) in 1-year survivors and Euro12,000 (Euro6600-25,000) in non-survivors. In a multivariate linear regression model adjusting for age and prior independency in self-care, an increase of one point in the 24h-EC-SOFA score was associated with an increase of Euro170 (95% CI Euro150-190) in the cost per day alive in the year after cardiac arrest. In the same model, an increase of one point in the 24h-EC-SOFA score was associated with an increase of Euro4400 (95% CI Euro3300-5500) in the total healthcare-associated costs in 1-year survivors.ConclusionsExtracerebral organ dysfunction is associated with long-term outcome and gross healthcare-associated costs of ICU-treated cardiac arrest patients. It should be considered when assessing interventions to improve outcomes and optimize the use of resources in these patients.
  • Pekkarinen, Pirkka T; Bäcklund, Minna; Efendijev, Ilmar; Raj, Rahul; Folger, Daniel; Litonius, Erik; Laitio, Ruut; Bendel, Stepani; Hoppu, Sanna; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Reinikainen, Matti; Skrifvars, Markus B (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background Organ dysfunction is common after cardiac arrest and associated with worse short-term outcome, but its impact on long-term outcome and treatment costs is unknown. Methods We used nationwide registry data from the intensive care units (ICU) of the five Finnish university hospitals to evaluate the association of 24-h extracerebral Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (24h-EC-SOFA) score with 1-year survival and healthcare-associated costs after cardiac arrest. We included adult cardiac arrest patients treated in the participating ICUs between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013. We acquired the confirmed date of death from the Finnish Population Register Centre database and gross 1-year healthcare-associated costs from the hospital billing records and the database of the Finnish Social Insurance Institution. Results A total of 5814 patients were included in the study, and 2401 were alive 1 year after cardiac arrest. Median (interquartile range (IQR)) 24h-EC-SOFA score was 6 (5–8) in 1-year survivors and 7 (5–10) in non-survivors. In multivariate regression analysis, adjusting for age and prior independency in self-care, the 24h-EC-SOFA score had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.16 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14–1.18) per point for 1-year mortality. Median (IQR) healthcare-associated costs in the year after cardiac arrest were €47,000 (€28,000–75,000) in 1-year survivors and €12,000 (€6600–25,000) in non-survivors. In a multivariate linear regression model adjusting for age and prior independency in self-care, an increase of one point in the 24h-EC-SOFA score was associated with an increase of €170 (95% CI €150–190) in the cost per day alive in the year after cardiac arrest. In the same model, an increase of one point in the 24h-EC-SOFA score was associated with an increase of €4400 (95% CI €3300–5500) in the total healthcare-associated costs in 1-year survivors. Conclusions Extracerebral organ dysfunction is associated with long-term outcome and gross healthcare-associated costs of ICU-treated cardiac arrest patients. It should be considered when assessing interventions to improve outcomes and optimize the use of resources in these patients.
  • Young, Paul J.; Bailey, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Bernard, Stephen; Bray, Janet; Jakkula, Pekka; Kuisma, Markku; Mackle, Diane; Martin, Daniel; Nolan, Jerry P.; Panwar, Rakshit; Reinikainen, Matti; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Thomas, Matt (2020)
    Aim: The effect of conservative versus liberal oxygen therapy on mortality rates in post cardiac arrest patients is uncertain. Methods: We undertook an individual patient data meta-analysis of patients randomised in clinical trials to conservative or liberal oxygen therapy after a cardiac arrest. The primary end point was mortality at last follow-up. Results: Individual level patient data were obtained from seven randomised clinical trials with a total of 429 trial participants included. Four trials enrolled patients in the pre-hospital period. Of these, two provided protocol-directed oxygen therapy for 60 min, one provided it until the patient was handed over to the emergency department staff, and one provided it for a total of 72 h or until the patient was extubated. Three trials enrolled patients after intensive care unit (ICU) admission and generally continued protocolised oxygen therapy for a longer period, often until ICU discharge. A total of 90 of 221 patients (40.7%) assigned to conservative oxygen therapy and 103 of 206 patients (50%) assigned to liberal oxygen therapy had died by this last point of followup; absolute difference; odds ratio (OR) adjusted for study only; 0.67; 95% CI 0.45 to 0.99; P = 0.045; adjusted OR, 0.58; 95% CI 0.35 to 0.96; P = 0.04. Conclusion: Conservative oxygen therapy was associated with a statistically significant reduction in mortality at last follow-up compared to liberal oxygen therapy but the certainty of available evidence was low or very low due to bias, imprecision, and indirectness. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42019138931.
  • COSCA collaborators; Haywood, Kirstie; Castren, Maaret (2018)
    Cardiac arrest effectiveness trials have traditionally reported outcomes that focus on survival. A lack of consistency in outcome reporting between trials limits the opportunities to pool results for meta-analysis. The COSCA initiative (Core Outcome Set for Cardiac Arrest), a partnership between patients, their partners, clinicians, research scientists, and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, sought to develop a consensus core outcome set for cardiac arrest for effectiveness trials. Core outcome sets are primarily intended for large, randomised clinical effectiveness trials (sometimes referred to as pragmatic trials or phase III/IV trials) rather than for pilot or efficacy studies. A systematic review of the literature combined with qualitative interviews among cardiac arrest survivors was used to generate a list of potential outcome domains. This list was prioritised through a Delphi process, which involved clinicians, patients, and their relatives/partners. An international advisory panel narrowed these down to 3 core domains by debate that led to consensus. The writing group refined recommendations for when these outcomes should be measured and further characterised relevant measurement tools. Consensus emerged that a core outcome set for reporting on effectiveness studies of cardiac arrest (COSCA) in adults should include survival, neurological function, and health-related quality of life. This should be reported as survival status and modified Rankin scale score at hospital discharge, at 30 days, or both. Health-related quality of life should be measured with >= 1 tools from Health Utilities Index version 3, Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey, and EuroQol 5D-5L at 90 days and at periodic intervals up to 1 year after cardiac arrest, if resources allow. (C) 2018 European Resuscitation Council and American Heart Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Humaloja, Jaana; Litonius, Erik; Efendijev, Ilmar; Folger, Daniel; Raj, Rahul; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Skrifvars, Markus B. (2019)
    Aim: Studies suggest that hyperoxemia increases short-term mortality after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), but the effect of hyperoxemia on long-term outcomes is unclear. We determined the prevalence of early hyperoxemia after CPR and its association with long-term neurological outcome and mortality. Methods: We analysed data from adult cardiac arrest patients treated after CPR in tertiary ICUs during 2005-2013. We retrieved data from the resuscitation and the first arterial blood sample collected after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) (severe hyperoxemia defined as PaO2 > 40 kPa and moderate as PaO2 16-40 kPa). We inspected two outcomes, neurological performance at one year after resuscitation according to the Cerebral Performance Category and one-year mortality. We used logistic regression to test associations between hyperoxemia and the outcome and interaction analyses to test the effect of hyperoxemia exposure on the outcomes in smaller subgroups. Results: Of 1110 patients 11% had severe hyperoxemia, prevalence was 10% for out-of-hospital arrests, 13% for in-hospital arrests and 9% for in-ICU arrests. In total 585(53%) patients had an unfavourable neurological outcome. Compared to normoxemia, severe (Odds ratio [OR] 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50-1.30) and moderate hyperoxemia (OR 0.94 95%CI 0.69-1.27) did not associate with neurological outcome. Additionally, hyperoxemia had no association with mortality. In subgroup analyses there were no significant associations between severe hyperoxemia and outcomes regardless of cardiac arrest location, initial rhythm or time-to-ROSC. Conclusion: We found no association between early post-arrest hyperoxemia and unfavourable outcome, Subgroup analysis found no differential effect depending on arrest location, initial rhythm or time-to-ROSC.
  • Kortelainen, Jukka; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Tiainen, Marjaana; Strbian, Daniel; Rantanen, Kirsi; Laurila, Jouko; Koskenkari, Juha; Kallio, Mika; Toppila, Jussi; Väyrynen, Eero; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Hästbacka, Johanna (2021)
    Aim of the study: EEG slow wave activity (SWA) has shown prognostic potential in post-resuscitation care. In this prospective study, we investigated the accuracy of continuously measured early SWA for prediction of the outcome in comatose cardiac arrest (CA) survivors. Methods: We recorded EEG with a disposable self-adhesive frontal electrode and wireless device continuously starting from ICU admission until 48 h from return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in comatose CA survivors sedated with propofol. We determined SWA by offline calculation of C-Trend (R) Index describing SWA as a score ranging from 0 to 100. The functional outcome was defined based on Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) at 6 months after the CA to either good (CPC 1-2) or poor (CPC 3-5). Results: Outcome at six months was good in 67 of the 93 patients. During the first 12 h after ROSC, the median C-Trend Index value was 38.8 (interquartile range 28.0-56.1) in patients with good outcome and 6.49 (3.01-18.2) in those with poor outcome showing significant difference (p < 0.001) at every hour between the groups. The index values of the first 12h predicted poor outcome with an area under curve of 0.86 (95% CI0.61-0.99). With a cutoff value of 20, the sensitivity was 83.3% (69.6%-92.3%) and specificity 94.7% (83.4%-99.7%) for categorization of outcome. Conclusion: EEG SWA measured with C-Trend Index during propofol sedation offers a promising practical approach for early bedside evaluation of recovery of brain function and prediction of outcome after CA.
  • Ristagno, Giuseppe; Masson, Serge; Tiainen, Marjaana; Bendel, Stepani; Bernasconi, Roberto; Varpula, Tero M; Milani, Valentina; Vaahersalo, Jukka; Magnoli, Michela; Spanuth, Eberhard; Barlera, Simona; Latini, Roberto; Hoppu, Sanna; Pettila, Ville; Skrifvars, Markus; FINNRESUSCI Study Grp (2016)
    Background: An intense systemic inflammatory response is observed following reperfusion after cardiac arrest. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is a granule protein released by neutrophils that intervenes in endothelial permeability regulation. In the present study, we investigated plasma levels of HBP in a large population of patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We hypothesized that high circulating levels of HBP are associated with severity of post-cardiac arrest syndrome and poor outcome. Methods: Plasma was obtained from 278 patients enrolled in a prospective multicenter observational study in 21 intensive care units (ICU) in Finland. HBP was assayed at ICU admission and 48 h later. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) was defined as the 24 h Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score >= 12. ICU death and 12-month Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) were evaluated. Multiple linear and logistic regression tests and receiver operating characteristic curves with area under the curve (AUC) were performed. Results: Eighty-two percent of patients (229 of 278) survived to ICU discharge and 48 % (133 of 276) to 1 year with a favorable neurological outcome (CPC 1 or 2). At ICU admission, median plasma levels of HBP were markedly elevated, 15.4 [9.6-31.3] ng/mL, and persisted high 48 h later, 14.8 [9.8-31.1] ng/mL. Admission levels of HBP were higher in patients who had higher 24 h SOFA and cardiovascular SOFA score (p <0.0001) and in those who developed MODS compared to those who did not (29.3 [13.7-60.1] ng/mL vs. 13.6 [9.1-26.2] ng/mL, p <0.0001; AUC = 0.70 +/- 0.04, p = 0.0001). Admission levels of HBP were also higher in patients who died in ICU (31.0 [17.7-78.2] ng/mL) compared to those who survived (13.5 [9.1-25.5] ng/mL, p <0.0001) and in those with an unfavorable 12-month neurological outcome compared to those with a favorable one (18.9 [11.3-44.3] ng/mL vs. 12.8 [8.6-30.4] ng/mL, p <0.0001). Admission levels of HBP predicted early ICU death with an AUC of 0.74 +/- 0. 04 (p <0.0001) and were independently associated with ICU death (OR [95 %CI] 1.607 [1.076-2.399], p = 0.020), but not with unfavorable 12-month neurological outcome (OR [95 %CI] 1.154 [0.834-1.596], p = 0.387). Conclusions: Elevated plasma levels of HBP at ICU admission were independently associated with early death in ICU.
  • Irfan, Furqan B.; Bhutta, Zain Ali; Castren, Maaret; Straney, Lahn; Djarv, Therese; Tariq, Tooba; Thomas, Stephen Hodges; Alinier, Guillaume; Al Shaikh, Loua; Owen, Robert Campbell; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Singh, Rajvir; Cameron, Peter Alistair (2016)
    Background: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) studies from the Middle East and Asian region are limited. This study describes the epidemiology, emergency health services, and outcomes of OHCA in Qatar. Methods: This was a prospective nationwide population-based observational study on OHCA patients in Qatar according to Utstein style guidelines, from June 2012 to May 2013. Data was collected from various sources; the national emergency medical service, 4 emergency departments, and 8 public hospitals. Results: The annual crude incidence of presumed cardiac OHCA attended by EMS was 23.5 per 100,000. The age sex standardized incidence was 87.8 per 100,000 population. Of the 447 OHCA patients included in the final analysis, most were male (n = 360, 80.5%) with median age of 51 years (IQR = 39-66). Frequently observed nationalities were Qatari (n = 89, 19.9%), Indian (n = 74, 16.6%) and Nepalese (n = 52, 11.6%). Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was carried out in 92 (20.6%) OHCA patients. Survival rate was 8.1% (n = 36) and multivariable logistic regression indicated that initial shockable rhythm (OR 13.4, 95% CI 5.4-33.3, p = 0.001) was associated with higher odds of survival while male gender (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.1-0.8, p = 0.01) and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.04-0.5, p = 0.02) were associated with lower odds of survival. Conclusions: Standardized incidence and survival rates were comparable to Western countries. Although expatriates comprise more than 80% of the population, Qataris contributed 20% of the total cardiac arrests observed. There are significant opportunities to improve outcomes, including community-based CPR and defibrillation training. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Graesner, Jan-Thorsten; Lefering, Rolf; Koster, Rudolph W.; Masterson, Siobhan; Boettiger, Bernd W.; Herlitz, Johan; Wnent, Jan; Tjelmeland, Ingvild B. M.; Rosell Ortiz, Fernando; Maurer, Holger; Baubin, Michael; Mols, Pierre; Hadzibegovic, Irzal; Ioannides, Marios; Skulec, Roman; Wissenberg, Mads; Salo, Ari; Hubert, Herve; Nikolaou, Nikolaos I.; Loczi, Gerda; Svavarsdottir, Hildigunnur; Semeraro, Federico; Wright, Peter J.; Clarens, Carlo; Pijls, Ruud; Cebula, Grzegorz; Correia, Vitor Gouveia; Cimpoesu, Diana; Raffay, Violetta; Trenkler, Stefan; Markota, Andrej; Stroemsoee, Anneli; Burkart, Roman; Perkins, Gavin D.; Bossaert, Leo L.; EuReCa ONE Collaborators (2016)
    Introduction: The aim of the EuReCa ONE study was to determine the incidence, process, and outcome for out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) throughout Europe. Methods: This was an international, prospective, multi-centre one-month study. Patients who suffered an OHCA during October 2014 who were attended and/or treated by an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) were eligible for inclusion in the study. Data were extracted from national, regional or local registries. Results: Data on 10,682 confirmed OHCAs from 248 regions in 27 countries, covering an estimated population of 174 million. In 7146 (66%) cases, CPR was started by a bystander or by the EMS. The incidence of CPR attempts ranged from 19.0 to 104.0 per 100,000 population per year. 1735 had ROSC on arrival at hospital (25.2%), Overall, 662/6414 (10.3%) in all cases with CPR attempted survived for at least 30 days or to hospital discharge. Conclusion: The results of EuReCa ONE highlight that OHCA is still a major public health problem accounting for a substantial number of deaths in Europe. EuReCa ONE very clearly demonstrates marked differences in the processes for data collection and reported outcomes following OHCA all over Europe. Using these data and analyses, different countries, regions, systems, and concepts can benchmark themselves and may learn from each other to further improve survival following one of our major health care events. (C) 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • Nolan, Jerry P.; Sandroni, Claudio; Böttiger, Bernd W.; Cariou, Alain; Cronberg, Tobias; Friberg, Hans; Genbrugge, Cornelia; Haywood, Kirstie; Lilja, Gisela; Moulaert, Veronique R. M.; Nikolaou, Nikolaos; Olasveengen, Theresa Mariero; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Taccone, Fabio; Soar, Jasmeet (2021)
    The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) and the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) have collaborated to produce these post-resuscitation care guidelines for adults, which are based on the 2020 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Science with Treatment Recommendations. The topics covered include the post-cardiac arrest syndrome, diagnosis of cause of cardiac arrest, control of oxygenation and ventilation, coronary reperfusion, haemodynamic monitoring and management, control of seizures, temperature control, general intensive care management, prognostication, long-term outcome, rehabilitation and organ donation.
  • Kupari, Petteri; Skrifvars, Markus; Kuisma, Markku (2017)
    Background: The return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest (RACA) score may have implications as a quality indicator for the emergency medical services (EMS) system. We aimed to validate this score externally in a physician staffed urban EMS system. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study. Data on resuscitation attempts from the Helsinki EMS cardiac arrest registry from 1.1.2008 to 31.12.2010 were collected and analyzed. For each attempted resuscitation the RACA score variables were collected and the score calculated. The endpoint was ROSC defined as palpable pulse over 30 s. Calibration was assessed by comparing predicted and observed ROSC rates in the whole sample, separately for shockable and non-shockable rhythm, and separately for resuscitations lead by a specialist, registrar or medical supervisor (i.e., senior paramedic). Data are presented as medians and interquartile ranges. Statistical testing included chi-square test, the Mann-Whitney U test, Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness of fit test and calculation of 95% confidence intervals (CI) for proportions. Results: A total of 680 patients were included of whom 340 attained ROSC. The RACA score was higher in patients with ROSC (0.62 [0.46-0.69] than in those without (0.46 [0.36-0.57]) (p <0.001). Observed against predicted ROSC indicated reasonable calibration overall (p = 0.30), with better calibration in patients with a shockable initial rhythm (p = 0.75) than in patients with a non-shockable rhythm (p = 0.04). There was no statistical difference between observed and predicted ROSC rates in resuscitations attended by a specialist (50% vs 53%, 95% CI 45-55) or registrar (55% vs 53%, 95% CI 48-62), but rates were lower than predicted in resuscitations lead by a medical supervisor (36% vs 49%, 95% CI 25-47). Discussion: Developing a practical severity-of-illness scoring system for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients would allow patient heterogeneity adjustment and measurement of quality of care in analogy to commoly used severity-of-illness-scores developed for the similar purposes for the general intensive care unit population. However, transferring RACA score to another country with different population and EMS system might affect the performance and generalizability of the score. Conclusions: This study found a good overall calibration and moderate discrimination of the RACA score in a physician staffed urban EMS system which suggests external validity of the score. Calibration was suboptimal in patients with a non-shockable rhythm which may due to a local do-not-attempt-resuscitation policy. The lower than expected overall ROSC rate in resuscitations attended by medical supervisors requires further study.
  • Tiainen, Marjaana; Poutiainen, Erja; Oksanen, Tuomas; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Pettila, Ville; Skrifvars, Markus; Varpula, Tero; Castren, Maaret (2015)
  • Pasquier, Mathieu; Hugli, Olivier; Paal, Peter; Darocha, Tomasz; Blancher, Marc; Husby, Paul; Silfvast, Tom; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Rousson, Valentin (2018)
    Aims: Currently, the decision to initiate extracorporeal life support for patients who suffer cardiac arrest due to accidental hypothermia is essentially based on serum potassium level. Our goal was to build a prediction score in order to determine the probability of survival following rewarming of hypothermic arrested patients based on several covariates available at admission. Methods: We included consecutive hypothermic arrested patients who underwent rewarming with extracorporeal life support. The sample comprised 237 patients identified through the literature from 18 studies, and 49 additional patients obtained from hospital data collection. We considered nine potential predictors of survival: age; sex; core temperature; serum potassium level; mechanism of hypothermia; cardiac rhythm at admission; witnessed cardiac arrest, rewarming method and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration prior to the initiation of extracorporeal life support. The primary outcome parameter was survival to hospital discharge. Results: Overall, 106 of the 286 included patients survived (37%; 95% CI: 32-43%), most (84%) with a good neurological outcome. The final score included the following variables: age, sex, core temperature at admission, serum potassium level, mechanism of cooling, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration. The corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.895 (95% CI: 0.859-0.931) compared to 0.774 (95% CI: 0.720-0.828) when based on serum potassium level alone. Conclusions: In this large retrospective study we found that our score was superior to dichotomous triage based on serum potassium level in assessing which hypothermic patients in cardiac arrest would benefit from extracorporeal life support. External validation of our findings is required.
  • Holmström, Ester; Efendijev, Ilmar; Raj, Rahul; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Litonius, Erik; Skrifvars, Markus B. (2021)
    BackgroundCardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. As population ages, the need for research focusing on CA in elderly increases. This study investigated treatment intensity, 12-month neurological outcome, mortality and healthcare-associated costs for patients aged over 75 years treated for CA in an intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary hospital.MethodsThis single-centre retrospective study included adult CA patients treated in a Finnish tertiary hospital's ICU between 2005 and 2013. We stratified the study population into two age groups: 75 years. We compared interventions defined by the median daily therapeutic scoring system (TISS-76) between the age groups to find differences in treatment intensity. We calculated cost-effectiveness by dividing the total one-year healthcare-associated costs of all patients by the number of survivors with a favourable neurological outcome. Favourable outcome was defined as a cerebral performance category (CPC) of 1-2 at 12 months after cardiac arrest. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent associations between age group, mortality and neurological outcome.ResultsThis study included a total of 1,285 patients, of which 212 (16%) were >= 75 years of age. Treatment intensity was lower for the elderly compared to the younger group, with median TISS scores of 116 and 147, respectively (p
  • De Fazio, Chiara; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Soreide, Eldar; Creteur, Jacques; Grejs, Anders M.; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Laitio, Timo; Nee, Jens; Kirkegaard, Hans; Taccone, Fabio Silvio (2019)
    BackgroundThe aim of this study was to explore the performance and outcomes for intravascular (IC) versus surface cooling devices (SFC) for targeted temperature management (TTM) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.MethodsA retrospective analysis of data from the Time-differentiated Therapeutic Hypothermia (TTH48) trial (NCT01689077), which compared whether TTM at 33 degrees C for 48h results in better neurologic outcomes compared with standard 24-h duration. Devices were assessed for the speed of cooling and rewarming rates. Precision was assessed by measuring temperature variability (TV), i.e., the standard deviation (SD) of all temperature measurements in the cooling phase. Main outcomes were overall mortality and poor neurological outcome, including death, severe disability, or vegetative status.ResultsA total of 352 patients had available data and were included in the analysis; of those, 218 (62%) were managed with IC. A total of 114/218 (53%) patients with IC and 61/134 (43%) with SFC were cooled for 48h (p=0.22). Time to target temperature (34 degrees C) was significantly shorter for patients treated with endovascular devices (2.2 [1.1-4.0] vs. 4.2 [2.7-6.0] h, p
  • De Fazio, Chiara; Skrifvars, Markus B; Søreide, Eldar; Creteur, Jacques; Grejs, Anders M; Kjærgaard, Jesper; Laitio, Timo; Nee, Jens; Kirkegaard, Hans; Taccone, Fabio S (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to explore the performance and outcomes for intravascular (IC) versus surface cooling devices (SFC) for targeted temperature management (TTM) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods A retrospective analysis of data from the Time-differentiated Therapeutic Hypothermia (TTH48) trial (NCT01689077), which compared whether TTM at 33 °C for 48 h results in better neurologic outcomes compared with standard 24-h duration. Devices were assessed for the speed of cooling and rewarming rates. Precision was assessed by measuring temperature variability (TV), i.e., the standard deviation (SD) of all temperature measurements in the cooling phase. Main outcomes were overall mortality and poor neurological outcome, including death, severe disability, or vegetative status. Results A total of 352 patients had available data and were included in the analysis; of those, 218 (62%) were managed with IC. A total of 114/218 (53%) patients with IC and 61/134 (43%) with SFC were cooled for 48 h (p = 0.22). Time to target temperature (≤ 34 °C) was significantly shorter for patients treated with endovascular devices (2.2 [1.1–4.0] vs. 4.2 [2.7–6.0] h, p < 0.001), but temperature was also lower on admission (35.0 [34.2–35.6] vs. 35.3 [34.5–35.8]°C; p = 0.02) and cooling rate was similar (0.4 [0.2–0.8] vs. 0.4 [0.2–0.6]°C/h; p = 0.14) when compared to SFC. Temperature variability was significantly lower in the endovascular device group when compared with SFC methods (0.6 [0.4–0.9] vs. 0.7 [0.5–1.0]°C; p = 0.007), as was rewarming rate (0.31 [0.22–0.44] vs. 0.37 [0.29–0.49]°C/hour; p = 0.02). There was no statistically significant difference in mortality (endovascular 65/218, 29% vs. others 43/134, 32%; p = 0.72) or poor neurological outcome (endovascular 69/218, 32% vs. others 51/134, 38%; p = 0.24) between type of devices. Conclusions Endovascular cooling devices were more precise than SFC methods in patients cooled at 33 °C after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Main outcomes were similar with regard to the cooling methods.
  • Sanmark, Johan (Helsingfors universitet, 2015)
    Vid återupplivningar på HUCS Peijas sjukvårdsområde utlarmas såväl ambulans som läkarhelikopter. Denna undersökning jämför ambulanssjukvårdarnas och läkarhelikopterns läkares journalföring vid återupplivningssituationer under år 2011. Sammanlagt 85 patientfall identifierades och i 69 fall av dessa hittades såväl ambulansjournalen som läkarjournalen. I undersökningen framgick att det råder stora skillnader i dokumentationen mellan läkar- och ambulansjournalerna. Endast i 4 av 22 patienter som uppnått spontan circulation (ROSC) var ROSC-tiden samma i bägge journalerna. Också i de antecknade tidsintervallen för olika interventioner fanns stora diskrepanser. Endast i 1 fall av 69 var läkarens ankomsttid samma i bägge journalerna. Anteckning om säkrad luftväg saknades i 25 ambulansjournaler och 18 läkarjournaler. Den stora diskrepansen mellan journalerna var överraskande. Ifall man tyr sig till endast endera källan blir databortfallet stort och datans relevans och tillförlitlighet kan ifrågasättas. I fortsättningen borde journalerna utvecklas, så att journalföringen blir enklare och tillförlitligare.