Browsing by Subject "Cardiovascular risk factors"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-2 of 2
  • Urtamo, Annele; Jyväkorpi, Satu K.; Kautiainen, Hannu; Pitkälä, Kaisu H.; Strandberg, Timo E. (2020)
    Background The studies on the association of various midlife risk factors with reaching 90 years or more are scarce. We studied this association in a socioeconomically homogenous cohort of businessmen. Methods The study consists of men (n = 970) from the Helsinki Businessmen Study cohort (born 1919-1928). Five major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (smoking, BMI, blood pressure, serum lipids, fasting glucose), consumption of alcohol and coffee, self-rated health and self-rated fitness, were assessed in 1974, at an average age of 50 years. The number of major risk factors was tested as a risk burden. The Charlson Comorbidity Index and the RAND-36 (SF-36) Physical and Mental health summary scores were calculated from surveys in year 2000, at age of 73 years. Mortality dates were retrieved through 31 March 2018 from the Population Information System of Finland. Results 244 men survived to the age of 90 representing 25.2% of the study cohort. The survivors had less risk factor burden in midlife, and less morbidity and higher physical health summary score in 2000. Of those with five major risk factors only 7% survived up to 90 years, whereas 51% of those without any risk factors reached that age. Single risk factors reducing odds of reaching 90 years were smoking (odds ratio [OR] 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.67), glucose (0.66, 0.49-0.88), BMI (0.63, 0.46-0.86), and cholesterol (0.71, 0.53-0.96). Conclusion Lack of five major CVD risk factors in midlife strongly increased odds of reaching 90 years of age and also predicted factors related to successful ageing in late life.
  • Urtamo, Annele; Huohvanainen, Emmi; Pitkälä, Kaisu H.; Strandberg, Timo E. (2019)
    BackgroundActive and healthy aging (AHA) is an important phenomenon in aging societies.AimsOur aim was to investigate midlife predictors of AHA in a socioeconomically homogenous male cohort.MethodsIn 2010, AHA was defined in the Helsinki Businessmen Study (men born in 1919-1934) with six criteria: (1) being alive, (2) responding to the mailed survey, (3) no reported cognitive problems, (4) feeling of happiness, (5) no difficulties in activities of daily living (ADL), and (6) no significant chronic diseases. Midlife factors were assessed in 1974 (n=1759, mean age 47years). Of the survivors in 2010 (n=839), 10.0% (n=84) fulfilled all AHA criteria, whilst 13.7% (n=115) had chronic diseases but fulfilled other five criteria. Midlife predictors of AHA were analyzed with logistic models.ResultsOf the midlife factors, smoking [Odds ratio (OR) 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.25-0.77], higher body mass index (BMI) (OR 0.75, 0.59-0.96), andhigher total cholesterol (OR 0.76, 0.60-0.97)prevented significantly full AHA criteria, whereas higher self-rated health (SRH) (OR 1.73, 1.07-2.80) predicted significantly offulfilling all AHA criteria. Midlife smoking (OR 0.87, 0.84-0.91), higher BMI (OR 0.73, 0.61-0.86), andhigher alcohol consumption (OR 0.73, 0.60-0.90)prevented significantly of fulfilling the five AHA criteria with chronic diseases, and higher SRH (OR 1.90, 1.37-2.63) predictedsignificantly thefive AHA criteria (chronic diseases present).DiscussionOur study suggests that midlife factors, especially good SRH and low levels of cardiovascular risk factors, are associated with AHA.ConclusionsThe study emphasizes the importance of life-course predictors of healthy aging.