Browsing by Subject "Carotenoid"

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  • Tossavainen, Marika; Ilyass, Usman; Ollilainen, Velimatti; Valkonen, Kalle; Ojala, Anne; Romantschuk, Martin (2019)
    Nitrogen limitation is considered a good strategy for enhancement of algal lipid production while conversely N repletion has been shown to result in biomass rich in proteins. In this study, the influence of long-term N limitation on Euglena gracilis fatty acid (FA), protein, chlorophyll a, and carotenoid concentrations was studied in N limited cultures. Biomass composition was analyzed from three-time points from N starved late stationary phase cultures, exposed to three different initial N concentrations in the growth medium. Total lipid content increased under N limitation in ageing cultures, but the low N content and prolonged cultivation time resulted in the formation of a high proportion of saturated FAs. Furthermore, growth as well as the production of proteins, chlorophyll a and carotenoids were enhanced in higher N concentrations and metabolism of these cellular components stayed stable during the stationary growth phase. Our findings showed that a higher N availability and a shorter cultivation time is a good strategy for efficient E. gracilis biomass production, regardless of whether the produced biomass is intended for maximal recovery of polyunsaturated FAs, proteins, or photosynthetic pigments. Additionally, we showed an increase of neoxanthin, beta-carotene, and diadinoxanthin as a response to higher N availability.
  • Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Atherton, Jon; Olascoaga, Beñat; Kolari, Pasi; Porcar Castell, Albert; García-Plazaola, José I. (2018)
    Subarctic plants in summer (subjected to continuous light) showed photosynthetic pigment contents mainly driven by PPFD (unrelated to day/night cycles) and a xanthophyll cycle responsiveness to PPFD exacerbated during night-times. Composition and content of photosynthetic pigments is finely tuned by plants according to a subtle equilibrium between the absorbed and used energy by the photosynthetic apparatus. Subarctic and Arctic plants are subjected to extended periods of continuous light during summer. This condition represents a unique natural scenario to study the influence of light on pigment regulation and the presence of diurnal patterns potentially governed by circadian rhythms. Here, we examined the modulation of the photosynthetic apparatus in three naturally co-occurring woody species: mountain birch (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii), alpine bearberry (Arctostaphylos alpina) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) around the summer solstice, at 67 A degrees N latitude. Plants were continuously exposed to solar radiation during the 3-day study period, although PPFD fluctuated, being lower during night-times. Photochemical efficiencies for a given PPFD were similar during daytime and night-time for the three species. In Scots pine, for a given PPFD, net assimilation was slightly higher during daytime than during night-time. Overall, the dynamism in pigment content was mainly driven by PPFD, and was generally unrelated to day/night cycles. Weak indications of potential circadian regulation were found over a few pigments only. Interestingly, the xanthophyll cycle was active at any time of the day in the three species but its responsiveness to PPFD was exacerbated during night-times. This was particularly evident for bearberry, which maintained a highly de-epoxidised state even at night-times. The results could indicate an incomplete acclimation to a 24-h photoperiod for these species, which have colonised subarctic latitudes only recently.