Browsing by Subject "Chronic kidney disease"

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  • Kamara, David A.; Ryom, Lene; Ross, Michael; Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Morlat, Philippe; Moranne, Olivier; Fux, Christoph A.; Mocroft, Amanda; Sabin, Caroline; Lundgren, Jens D.; Smith, Colette J.; DAD Study Grp; Ristola, Matti A (2014)
  • Strain, William David; Paldánius, Päivi Maria (2020)
    Aim: Clinical inertia is a multifactorial phenomenon, with contributing factors from people with diabetes and their healthcare team. It is widely cited that clinical inertia is minimised by participation in clinical trials. We assessed whether trial participation per se improves metabolic parameters in people with diabetes, or a specific focus on glycaemia is required. Methods: We compared improvement in glycaemic control in a pooled set of people assigned to the "placebo" arm from 25 glycaemia-focused trials with a pooled group of people with diabetes allocated to sham or non-pharmacological intervention for the treatment of diabetic retinal disease. Mean change in HbA1c (ANCOVA) was evaluated. Results: The overall placebo effect in studies focused on glucose control (N = 3081) was comparable between strata groups with and without complications. Adjusted least square mean change in HbA1c at 24 weeks was between-0.23% (-2.50 mmol/mol) and -0.32% (-3.50 mmol/mol). In studies focused on retinal disease (N = 288), the change from baseline in HbA1c was +0.10% (1.10 mmol/mol) and fasting plasma glucose was +0.50 mmol/L showing no improvement in metabolic parameters at 12 months. Conclusions: Clinical trial participation alone does not seem to improve metabolic parameters in people living with diabetes. The benefits observed in glycaemia-focused studies were independent of age and comorbidities. (C) 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Törmänen, Suvi; Pörsti, Ilkka; Lakkisto, Päivi; Tikkanen, Ilkka; Niemelä, Onni; Paavonen, Timo; Mustonen, Jukka; Eräranta, Arttu (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background We studied whether endothelin receptor antagonist and calcimimetic treatments influence renal damage and kidney renin-angiotensin (RA) components in adenine-induced chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). Methods Male Wistar rats (n = 80) were divided into 5 groups for 12 weeks: control (n = 12), 0.3% adenine (Ade; n = 20), Ade + 50 mg/kg/day sitaxentan (n = 16), Ade + 20 mg/kg/day cinacalcet (n = 16), and Ade + sitaxentan + cinacalcet (n = 16). Blood pressure (BP) was measured using tail-cuff, kidney histology was examined, and RA components measured using RT-qPCR. Results Adenine caused tubulointerstitial damage with severe CRI, anemia, hyperphosphatemia, 1.8-fold increase in urinary calcium excretion, and 3.5-fold and 18-fold increases in plasma creatinine and PTH, respectively. Sitaxentan alleviated tubular atrophy, while sitaxentan + cinacalcet combination reduced interstitial inflammation, tubular dilatation and atrophy in adenine-rats. Adenine diet did not influence kidney angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and AT4 receptor mRNA, but reduced mRNA of renin, AT1a, AT2, (pro)renin receptor and Mas to 40–60%, and suppressed ACE2 to 6% of that in controls. Sitaxentan reduced BP by 8 mmHg, creatinine, urea, and phosphate concentrations by 16–24%, and PTH by 42%. Cinacalcet did not influence BP or creatinine, but reduced PTH by 84%, and increased hemoglobin by 28% in adenine-rats. The treatments further reduced renin mRNA by 40%, while combined treatment normalized plasma PTH, urinary calcium, and increased ACE2 mRNA 2.5-fold versus the Ade group (p < 0.001). Conclusions In adenine-induced interstitial nephritis, sitaxentan improved renal function and tubular atrophy. Sitaxentan and cinacalcet reduced kidney renin mRNA by 40%, while their combination alleviated tubulointerstitial damage and urinary calcium loss, and increased kidney tissue ACE2 mRNA.
  • Törmänen, Suvi; Pörsti, Ilkka; Lakkisto, Päivi; Tikkanen, Ilkka; Niemelä, Onni; Paavonen, Timo; Mustonen, Jukka; Eräranta, Arttu (2017)
    Background: We studied whether endothelin receptor antagonist and calcimimetic treatments influence renal damage and kidney renin-angiotensin (RA) components in adenine-induced chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). Methods: Male Wistar rats (n = 80) were divided into 5 groups for 12 weeks: control (n = 12), 0.3% adenine (Ade; n = 20), Ade + 50 mg/kg/day sitaxentan (n = 16), Ade + 20 mg/kg/day cinacalcet (n = 16), and Ade + sitaxentan + cinacalcet (n = 16). Blood pressure (BP) was measured using tail-cuff, kidney histology was examined, and RA components measured using RT-qPCR. Results: Adenine caused tubulointerstitial damage with severe CRI, anemia, hyperphosphatemia, 1.8-fold increase in urinary calcium excretion, and 3.5-fold and 18-fold increases in plasma creatinine and PTH, respectively. Sitaxentan alleviated tubular atrophy, while sitaxentan + cinacalcet combination reduced interstitial inflammation, tubular dilatation and atrophy in adenine-rats. Adenine diet did not influence kidney angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and AT(4) receptor mRNA, but reduced mRNA of renin, AT(1a), AT(2), (pro) renin receptor and Mas to 40-60%, and suppressed ACE2 to 6% of that in controls. Sitaxentan reduced BP by 8 mmHg, creatinine, urea, and phosphate concentrations by 16-24%, and PTH by 42%. Cinacalcet did not influence BP or creatinine, but reduced PTH by 84%, and increased hemoglobin by 28% in adenine-rats. The treatments further reduced renin mRNA by 40%, while combined treatment normalized plasma PTH, urinary calcium, and increased ACE2 mRNA 2.5-fold versus the Ade group (p <0.001). Conclusions: In adenine-induced interstitial nephritis, sitaxentan improved renal function and tubular atrophy. Sitaxentan and cinacalcet reduced kidney renin mRNA by 40%, while their combination alleviated tubulointerstitial damage and urinary calcium loss, and increased kidney tissue ACE2 mRNA.
  • Shaw, Vanessa; Polderman, Nonnie; Renken-Terhaerdt, Jose; Paglialonga, Fabio; Oosterveld, Michiel; Tuokkola, Jetta; Anderson, Caroline; Desloovere, An; Greenbaum, Laurence; Haffner, Dieter; Nelms, Christina; Qizalbash, Leila; Vande Walle, Johan; Warady, Bradley; Shroff, Rukshana; Rees, Lesley (2020)
    Dietary management in pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an area fraught with uncertainties and wide variations in practice. Even in tertiary pediatric nephrology centers, expert dietetic input is often lacking. The Pediatric Renal Nutrition Taskforce (PRNT), an international team of pediatric renal dietitians and pediatric nephrologists, was established to develop clinical practice recommendations (CPRs) to address these challenges and to serve as a resource for nutritional care. We present CPRs for energy and protein requirements for children with CKD stages 2-5 and those on dialysis (CKD2-5D). We address energy requirements in the context of poor growth, obesity, and different levels of physical activity, together with the additional protein needs to compensate for dialysate losses. We describe how to achieve the dietary prescription for energy and protein using breastmilk, formulas, food, and dietary supplements, which can be incorporated into everyday practice. Statements with a low grade of evidence, or based on opinion, must be considered and adapted for the individual patient by the treating physician and dietitian according to their clinical judgment. Research recommendations have been suggested. The CPRs will be regularly audited and updated by the PRNT.
  • Barlovic, Drazenka Pongrac; Tikkanen-Dolenc, Heidi; Groop, Per-Henrik (2019)
    Purpose of Review Physical activity is a fundamental part of lifestyle management in diabetes care. Although its benefits are very well recognized in the general population and in people with type 2 diabetes, much less is known about the effects of exercise in type 1 diabetes. In particular, exercise effects in relation to diabetic kidney disease (DKD) are understudied. Some uncertainties about physical activity recommendations stem from the fact that strenuous exercise may worsen albuminuria immediately after the activity. However, in middle-aged and older adults without diabetes, observational studies have suggested that physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of rapid kidney function deterioration. In this review, we focus on the role of physical activity in patients with DKD and type 1 diabetes.\ Recent Findings Hereby, we present data that show that in individuals at risk of DKD or with established DKD, regular moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was associated with reduced incidence and progression of DKD, as well as reduced risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. Summary Therefore, regular moderate-to-vigorous exercise should become a central part of the management of individuals with type 1 diabetes, in the absence of contraindications and accompanied with all needed educational support for optimal diabetes management.
  • Palanca, Ana; Castelblanco, Esmeralda; Perpinan, Hector; Betriu, Angels; Soldevila, Berta; Manuel Valdivielso, Jose; Bermudez, Marcelino; Duran, Xavier; Fernandez, Elvira; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Groop, Per-Henrik; Alonso, Nuria; Mauricio, Didac (2018)
    Background and aims: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors fail to fully account for the increase in cardiovascular risk in these patients. This study aims to analyse the prevalence and progression of subclinical atherosclerosis in CKD patients with and without diabetes. Methods: We included data from CKD patients with and without diabetes free from previous cardiovascular events from the NEFRONA cohort. Patients underwent baseline and 24-month follow-up carotid and femoral ultrasound examinations. Multivariable models were used to assess the contribution of diabetes to the presence and plaque progression. Results: A total of 419 patients with diabetes and 1129 without diabetes were included. Diabetic patients were older, had higher BMIs, more hypertension and dyslipidaemia. At baseline, the proportion of patients with plaque was higher among diabetic patients (81.4% vs. 64.1%, p <0.001). Diabetic patients more frequently had more than two vascular territories with plaque (64.4% vs. 48.4%, p <0.001). Multivariable analysis indicated that plaque at baseline was significantly associated with age, gender, smoking and renal replacement therapy (RRT) in the non-diabetic patients, but only with age and male gender in diabetic patients. Plaque progression was significantly associated with age, number of territories with basal plaque, smoking and RRT in both groups. Conclusions: Subclinical atherosclerosis is more prevalent, carries a higher plaque burden and is more rapidly progressive in renal patients with diabetes. In these patients, diabetes outweighs other described risk factors associated with the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis. (c) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Forni, L. G.; Darmon, M.; Ostermann, M.; Oudemans-van Straaten, H. M.; Pettilä, Ville; Prowle, J. R.; Schetz, M.; Joannidis, M. (2017)
    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of critical illness and carries a significant risk of short-and long-term mortality, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular events. The degree of renal recovery from AKI may substantially affect these long-term endpoints. Therefore maximising recovery of renal function should be the goal of any AKI prevention and treatment strategy. Defining renal recovery is far from straightforward due in part to the limitations of the tests available to assess renal function. Here, we discuss common pitfalls in the evaluation of renal recovery and provide suggestions for improved assessment in the future. We review the epidemiology of renal recovery and of the association between AKI and the development of CKD. Finally, we stress the importance of post-discharge follow-up of AKI patients and make suggestions for its incorporation into clinical practice. Summary key points are that risk factors for non-recovery of AKI are age, CKD, comorbidity, higher severity of AKI and acute disease scores. Second, AKI and CKD are mutually related and seem to have a common denominator. Third, despite its limitations full recovery of AKI may best be defined as the absence of AKI criteria, and partial recovery as a fall in AKI stage. Fourth, after an episode of AKI, serial follow-up measurements of serum creatinine and proteinuria are warranted to diagnose renal impairment and prevent further progression. Measures to promote recovery are similar to those preventing renal harm. Specific interventions promoting repair are still experimental.
  • Päivärinta, Johanna; Oikonen, Vesa; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Tolvanen, Tuula; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Hidehiro, Iida; Nuutila, Pirjo; Metsärinne, Kaj; Koivuviita, Niina (2019)
    Background Despite improvement in short-term outcome of kidney transplants, the long-term survival of kidney transplants has not changed over past decades. Kidney biopsy is the gold standard of transplant pathology but it's invasive. Quantification of transplant blood flow could provide a novel non-invasive method to evaluate transplant pathology. The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional pilot study was to evaluate positron emission tomography (PET) as a method to measure kidney transplant perfusion and find out if there is correlation between transplant perfusion and histopathology. Methods Renal cortical perfusion of 19 kidney transplantation patients [average time from transplantation 33 (17-54) months; eGFR 55 (47-69) ml/min] and 10 healthy controls were studied by [(15) O]H2O PET. Perfusion and Doppler resistance index (RI) of transplants were compared with histology of one-year protocol transplant biopsy. Results Renal cortical perfusion of healthy control subjects and transplant patients were 2.7 (2.4-4.0) ml min(- 1) g(- 1) and 2.2 (2.0-3.0) ml min(- 1) g(- 1), respectively (p = 0.1). Renal vascular resistance (RVR) of the patients was 47.0 (36.7-51.4) mmHg mL(- 1)min(- 1)g(- 1) and that of the healthy 32.4 (24.6-39.6) mmHg mL(- 1)min(-1)g(-1) (p = 0.01). There was a statistically significant correlation between Doppler RI and perfusion of transplants (r = - 0.51, p = 0.026). Transplant Doppler RI of the group of mild fibrotic changes [0.73 (0.70-0.76)] and the group of no fibrotic changes [0.66 (0.61-0.72)] differed statistically significantly (p = 0.03). No statistically significant correlation was found between cortical perfusion and fibrosis of transplants (p = 0.56). Conclusions [(15) O]H2O PET showed its capability as a method in measuring perfusion of kidney transplants. RVR of transplant patients with stage 2-3 chronic kidney disease was higher than that of the healthy, although kidney perfusion values didn't differ between the groups. Doppler based RI correlated with perfusion and fibrosis of transplants.
  • Palanca, Ana; Castelblanco, Esmeralda; Betriu, Àngels; Perpiñán, Hèctor; Soldevila, Berta; Valdivielso, José M; Bermúdez-Lopez, Marcelino; Puig-Jové, Carlos; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Groop, Per-Henrik; Fernández, Elvira; Alonso, Núria; Mauricio, Didac (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background Individuals with diabetes have remarkably high rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the incremental cardiovascular risk in diabetes is heterogeneous and has often been related to renal involvement. The purpose of this study was to analyse the prognostic value of subclinical atherosclerosis in determining the incidence of first cardiovascular events (CVEs) in individuals with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) compared to CKD individuals without diabetes. Methods We included data from individuals with CKD with and without diabetes, free from pre-existing cardiovascular disease, from the NEFRONA cohort. Participants underwent baseline carotid and femoral ultrasound and were followed up for 4 years. All CVEs during follow-up were registered. Bivariate analysis and Fine–Gray competing risk models were used to perform the statistical analysis. Results During the mean follow-up time of 48 months, a total of 203 CVE was registered. 107 CVE occurred among participants without diabetes (19.58 per 1000 person-years) and 96 CVE occurred among participants with diabetes (44.44 per 1000 person-years). Following the competing risk analysis, the variables predicting CVEs in CKD individuals without diabetes were the number of territories with plaque at baseline (HR 1.862, 95% CI [1.432;2.240]), age (HR 1.026, 95% CI [1.003;1.049]) and serum concentrations of 25-OH vitamin D (HR 0.963, 95% CI [0.933;0.094]). The only variable predicting CVEs among CKD participants with diabetes was the number of territories with plaque at baseline (HR 1.782, 95% CI [1.393, 2.278]). For both models, concordance (C) index yielded was over 0.7. Conclusions The burden of subclinical atherosclerosis is the strongest predictor of future CVEs in diabetic individuals with CKD. Early detection of subclinical atherosclerotic burden by multiterritorial vascular ultrasound could improve CVE prediction in this population.
  • Palanca, Ana; Castelblanco, Esmeralda; Betriu, Angels; Perpinan, Hector; Soldevila, Berta; Manuel Valdivielso, Jose; Bermudez-Lopez, Marcelino; Puig-Jove, Carlos; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Groop, Per-Henrik; Fernandez, Elvira; Alonso, Nuria; Mauricio, Didac (2019)
    Background: Individuals with diabetes have remarkably high rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the incremental cardiovascular risk in diabetes is heterogeneous and has often been related to renal involvement. The purpose of this study was to analyse the prognostic value of subclinical atherosclerosis in determining the incidence of first cardiovascular events (CVEs) in individuals with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) compared to CKD individuals without diabetes. Methods: We included data from individuals with CKD with and without diabetes, free from pre-existing cardiovascular disease, from the NEFRONA cohort. Participants underwent baseline carotid and femoral ultrasound and were followed up for 4 years. All CVEs during follow-up were registered. Bivariate analysis and Fine-Gray competing risk models were used to perform the statistical analysis. Results: During the mean follow-up time of 48 months, a total of 203 CVE was registered. 107 CVE occurred among participants without diabetes (19.58 per 1000 person-years) and 96 CVE occurred among participants with diabetes (44.44 per 1000 person-years). Following the competing risk analysis, the variables predicting CVEs in CKD individuals without diabetes were the number of territories with plaque at baseline (HR 1.862, 95% CI [1.432;2.240]), age (HR 1.026, 95% CI [1.003;1.049]) and serum concentrations of 25-OH vitamin D (HR 0.963, 95% CI [0.933;0.094]). The only variable predicting CVEs among CKD participants with diabetes was the number of territories with plaque at baseline (HR 1.782, 95% CI [1.393, 2.278]). For both models, concordance (C) index yielded was over 0.7. Conclusions: The burden of subclinical atherosclerosis is the strongest predictor of future CVEs in diabetic individuals with CKD. Early detection of subclinical atherosclerotic burden by multiterritorial vascular ultrasound could improve CVE prediction in this population.
  • Desloovere, An; Renken-Terhaerdt, Jose; Tuokkola, Jetta; Shaw, Vanessa; Greenbaum, Larry A.; Haffner, Dieter; Anderson, Caroline; Nelms, Christina L.; Oosterveld, Michiel J. S.; Paglialonga, Fabio; Polderman, Nonnie; Qizalbash, Leila; Warady, Bradley A.; Shroff, Rukshana; Vande Walle, Johan (2021)
    Dyskalemias are often seen in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). While hyperkalemia is common, with an increasing prevalence as glomerular filtration rate declines, hypokalemia may also occur, particularly in children with renal tubular disorders and those on intensive dialysis regimens. Dietary assessment and adjustment of potassium intake is critically important in children with CKD as hyperkalemia can be life-threatening. Manipulation of dietary potassium can be challenging as it may affect the intake of other nutrients and reduce palatability. The Pediatric Renal Nutrition Taskforce (PRNT), an international team of pediatric renal dietitians and pediatric nephrologists, has developed clinical practice recommendations (CPRs) for the dietary management of potassium in children with CKD stages 2-5 and on dialysis (CKD2-5D). We describe the assessment of dietary potassium intake, requirements for potassium in healthy children, and the dietary management of hypo- and hyperkalemia in children with CKD2-5D. Common potassium containing foods are described and approaches to adjusting potassium intake that can be incorporated into everyday practice discussed. Given the poor quality of evidence available, a Delphi survey was conducted to seek consensus from international experts. Statements with a low grade or those that are opinion-based must be carefully considered and adapted to individual patient needs, based on the clinical judgment of the treating physician and dietitian. These CPRs will be regularly audited and updated by the PRNT.