Browsing by Subject "Cognitive impairment"

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  • FINGER Study Grp; Stephen, Ruth; Liu, Yawu; Ngandu, Tiia; Antikainen, Riitta; Hulkkonen, Juha; Koikkalainen, Juha; Levälahti, Esko; Parkkola, Riitta; Pippola, Pauliina; Rinne, Juha; Strandberg, Timo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Vanninen, Ritva; Kivipelto, Miia; Soininen, Hilkka; Solomon, Alina (2019)
    BackgroundThe Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) was a multicenter randomized controlled trial that reported beneficial effects on cognition for a 2-year multimodal intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring) versus control (general health advice). This study reports exploratory analyses of brain MRI measures.MethodsFINGER targeted 1260 older individuals from the general Finnish population. Participants were 60-77years old, at increased risk for dementia but without dementia/substantial cognitive impairment. Brain MRI scans were available for 132 participants (68 intervention, 64 control) at baseline and 112 participants (59 intervention, 53 control) at 2years. MRI measures included regional brain volumes, cortical thickness, and white matter lesion (WML) volume. Cognition was assessed at baseline and 1- and 2-year visits using a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. We investigated the (1) differences between the intervention and control groups in change in MRI outcomes (FreeSurfer 5.3) and (2) post hoc sub-group analyses of intervention effects on cognition in participants with more versus less pronounced structural brain changes at baseline (mixed-effects regression models, Stata 12).ResultsNo significant differences between the intervention and control groups were found on the changes in MRI measures. Beneficial intervention effects on processing speed were more pronounced in individuals with higher baseline cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease signature areas (composite measure of entorhinal, inferior and middle temporal, and fusiform regions). The randomization groupxtimexcortical thickness interaction coefficient was 0.198 (p=0.021). A similar trend was observed for higher hippocampal volume (groupxtimexhippocampus volume interaction coefficient 0.1149, p=0.085).ConclusionsThe FINGER MRI exploratory sub-study did not show significant differences between the intervention and control groups on changes in regional brain volumes, regional cortical thicknesses, or WML volume after 2years in at-risk elderly without substantial impairment. The cognitive benefits on processing speed of the FINGER intervention may be more pronounced in individuals with fewer structural brain changes on MRI at baseline. This suggests that preventive strategies may be more effective if started early, before the occurrence of more pronounced structural brain changes.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01041989. Registered January 5, 2010.
  • Stephen, Ruth; Liu, Yawu; Ngandu, Tiia; Antikainen, Riitta; Hulkkonen, Juha; Koikkalainen, Juha; Kemppainen, Nina; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Levälahti, Esko; Parkkola, Riitta; Pippola, Pauliina; Rinne, Juha; Strandberg, Timo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Vanninen, Ritva; Kivipelto, Miia; Soininen, Hilkka; Solomon, Alina (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background The Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) was a multicenter randomized controlled trial that reported beneficial effects on cognition for a 2-year multimodal intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring) versus control (general health advice). This study reports exploratory analyses of brain MRI measures. Methods FINGER targeted 1260 older individuals from the general Finnish population. Participants were 60–77 years old, at increased risk for dementia but without dementia/substantial cognitive impairment. Brain MRI scans were available for 132 participants (68 intervention, 64 control) at baseline and 112 participants (59 intervention, 53 control) at 2 years. MRI measures included regional brain volumes, cortical thickness, and white matter lesion (WML) volume. Cognition was assessed at baseline and 1- and 2-year visits using a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. We investigated the (1) differences between the intervention and control groups in change in MRI outcomes (FreeSurfer 5.3) and (2) post hoc sub-group analyses of intervention effects on cognition in participants with more versus less pronounced structural brain changes at baseline (mixed-effects regression models, Stata 12). Results No significant differences between the intervention and control groups were found on the changes in MRI measures. Beneficial intervention effects on processing speed were more pronounced in individuals with higher baseline cortical thickness in Alzheimer’s disease signature areas (composite measure of entorhinal, inferior and middle temporal, and fusiform regions). The randomization group × time × cortical thickness interaction coefficient was 0.198 (p = 0.021). A similar trend was observed for higher hippocampal volume (group × time × hippocampus volume interaction coefficient 0.1149, p = 0.085). Conclusions The FINGER MRI exploratory sub-study did not show significant differences between the intervention and control groups on changes in regional brain volumes, regional cortical thicknesses, or WML volume after 2 years in at-risk elderly without substantial impairment. The cognitive benefits on processing speed of the FINGER intervention may be more pronounced in individuals with fewer structural brain changes on MRI at baseline. This suggests that preventive strategies may be more effective if started early, before the occurrence of more pronounced structural brain changes. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01041989 . Registered January 5, 2010.
  • Castaneda, Anu E.; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Aronen, Eeva T.; Marttunen, Mauri; Kolho, Kaija-Leena (2013)
  • Hale, Jo Mhairi; Schneider, Daniel C.; Mehta, Neil K.; Myrskylä, Mikko (2020)
    Prior studies have analyzed the burden of cognitive impairment, but often use potentially biased prevalence-based methods or measure only years lived with impairment, without estimating other relevant metrics. We use the Health and Retirement Study (1998–2014; n = 29,304) and the preferred incidence-based Markov-chain models to assess three key measures of the burden of cognitive impairment: lifetime risk, mean age at onset, and number of years lived impaired. We analyze both mild and severe cognitive impairment (dementia) and gender, racial/ethnic, and educational variation in impairment. Our results paint a multi-dimensional picture of cognitive health, presenting the first comprehensive analysis of the burden of cognitive impairment for the U.S. population age 50 and older. Approximately two out of three Americans experience some level of cognitive impairment at an average age of approximately 70 years. For dementia, lifetime risk for women (men) is 37% (24%) and mean age at onset 83 (79) years. Women can expect to live 4.2 years with mild impairment and 3.2 with dementia, men 3.5 and 1.8 years. A critical finding is that for the most advantaged groups (i.e., White and/or higher educated), cognitive impairment is both delayed and compressed toward the very end of life. In contrast, despite the shorter lives of disadvantaged subgroups (Black and/or lower educated), they experience a younger age of onset, higher lifetime risk, and more years cognitively impaired. For example, men with at least an Associate degree have 21% lifetime dementia risk, compared to 35% among men with less than high school education. White women have 6 years of cognitively-impaired life expectancy, compared to 12 and 13 years among Black women and Latinas. These educational and racial/ethnic gradients highlight the very uneven burden of cognitive impairment. Further research is required to identify the mechanisms driving these disparities in cognitive impairment.
  • Rosenberg, Anna; Ngandu, Tiia; Rusanen, Minna; Antikainen, Riitta; Bäckman, Lars; Havulinna, Satu; Hänninen, Tuomo; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lehtisalo, Jenni; Levälahti, Esko; Lindström, Jaana; Paajanen, Teemu; Peltonen, Markku; Soininen, Hilkka; Stigsdotter-Neely, Anna; Strandberg, Timo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Solomon, Alina; Kivipelto, Miia (2018)
    Introduction: The 2-year Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) multidomain lifestyle intervention trial (NCT01041989) demonstrated beneficial effects on cognition. We investigated whether sociodemographics, socioeconomic status, baseline cognition, or cardiovascular factors influenced intervention effects on cognition. Methods: The FINGER recruited 1260 people from the general Finnish population (60-77 years, at risk for dementia). Participants were randomized 1: 1 to multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognition, and vascular risk management) and regular health advice. Primary outcome was change in cognition (Neuropsychological Test Battery z-score). Prespecified analyses to investigate whether participants' characteristics modified response to intervention were carried out using mixed-model repeated-measures analyses. Results: Sociodemographics (sex, age, and education), socioeconomic status (income), cognition (Mini-Mental State Examination), cardiovascular factors (body mass index, blood pressure, cholesterol, fasting glucose, and overall cardiovascular risk), and cardiovascular comorbidity did not modify response to intervention (P-values for interaction > .05). Conclusions: The FINGER intervention was beneficial regardless of participants' characteristics and can thus be implemented in a large elderly population at increased risk for dementia. (C) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the Alzheimer's Association.
  • Saario, Eeva L.; Mäkinen, Marja T.; Jämsen, Esa R. K.; Nikander, Pia; Castren, Maaret K. (2021)
    Background: Inadequate nutrition, falls, and cognitive impairment are common problems among acutely ill older people and are associated with complicated and prolonged health problems and mortality. Objectives: To assess if the emergency medical services can identify patients with nutritional risk, falls risk, and cognitive impairment by using simple screening tools and to assess the prevalence of risks and rate they are reported to the emergency department. Setting: The study was carried out in Espoo, Finland to patients over the age of 70 requiring non-urgent ambulance transfer to the emergency department. Outcome measures: A set of validated electronic screening tools was used to identify patients at nutritional risk, risk of falling and having cognitive impairment. Main results: A total of 488 (8%) out of 5792 patients were screened. Of the patients 60%, (n = 292) had at least one risk: 17% (n = 81) had nutritional risk, 43% (n = 209) falls risk, and 28% (n = 137) cognitive impairment. Twenty-two (5%) were screened positive in all three categories. The observed risk was reported to the emergency department staff in 59% (n = 173) of the patients. Conclusion: The emergency medical services can be used in preventive health care to identify patients having nutritional risk, falls risk, or cognitive impairment.
  • Hale, Jo Mhairi; Schneider, Daniel C.; Gampe, Jutta; Mehta, Neil K.; Myrskyla, Mikko (2020)
    Background: Accumulating evidence suggests risk of cognitive impairment is declining in high-income countries. Much of this research uses longitudinal surveys in which learning over repeated tests may bias results. We analyze trends in cognitive impairment in the United States, accounting for prior test experience and selective mortality. Methods: We use the Health and Retirement Study, a population-based, nationally representative panel dataset and include individuals ages 50 years and older in 1996-2014 (n = 32,784). We measure cognitive impairment and dementia using standard cutpoints of the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status. We estimate logistic regression models for any impairment and dementia over time, adjusting for age, sex, and race/ethnicity, comparing models with and without adjustment for practice effects and education. We examine heterogeneity in trends by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and education. Results: Models not controlling for test experience suggest that risk of cognitive impairment and dementia decreased over the study period. Controlling for test experience reverses the trend. In our primary models, prevalence of any cognitive impairment increased for women from 18.7% to 21.2% (annual change 0.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1%, 1.3%) and for men from 17.6% to 21.0% (annual change 1.0%, CI, 0.5%, 1.4%). For dementia, women's annual increase was 1.7% (CI, 0.8%, 2.6%) and men's 2.0% (CI, 1.0%, 2.9%). If not for education, the increase would have been stronger. Increased risk was particularly rapid for Latinas, the least educated, and older ages. Conclusions: Risk of cognitive impairment increased from 1996 to 2014. Uncovering determinants of increasing cognitive impairment risk should become a research priority. See video abstract:.