Browsing by Subject "Colour"

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  • Dominguez-Hernandez, Elisa; Salaseviciene, Alvija; Ertbjerg, Per (2018)
    Abstract Heat treatment of meat at temperatures between 50 and 65 °C, for extended periods of time, is known as low-temperature long-time (LTLT) cooking. This cooking method produces meat that has increased tenderness and better appearance than when cooked at higher temperatures. Public concerns regarding this method have focused on the ability to design heat treatments that can reach microbiological safety. The heat treatment induces modification of the meat structure and its constituents, which can explain the desirable eating quality traits obtained. Denaturation, aggregation, and degradation of myofibrillar, sarcoplasmic and connective tissue proteins occur depending on the combination of time and temperature during the heat treatment. The protein changes, especially in relation to collagen denaturation, along with proteolytic activity, have often been regarded to be the main contributors to the increased meat tenderness. The mechanisms involved and the possible contribution of other factors are reviewed and discussed.
  • Jonauskaite, Domicele; Abdel-Khalek, Ahmed; Abu-Akel, Ahmad; Al-Rasheed, Abdulrahman Saud; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Ásgeirsson, Árni Gunnar; Atitsogbe, Kokou Amenyona; Barma, Marodégueba; Barratt, Daniel; Bogushevskaya, Victoria; Bouayed Meziane, Maliha Khadidja; Chamseddine, Amer; Charernboom, Thammanard; Chkonia, Eka; Ciobanu, Teofil; Corona, Violeta; Creed, Allison; Dael, Nele; Daouk, Hassan; Dimitrova, Nevena; Doorenbos, Cornelis B.; Fomins, Sergejs; Fonseca-Pedrero, Eduardo; Gaspar, Augusta; Gizdic, Alena; Griber, Yulia A.; Grimshaw, Gina; Hasan Aya, Ahmed; Havelka, Jelena; Hirnstein, Marco; Karlsson, Bodil S.A.; Kim, Jejoong; Konstantinou, Nikos; Laurent, Eric; Lindeman, Marjaana; Manav, Banu; Marquardt, Lynn; Mefoh, Philip; Mroczko-Wąsowicz, Aleksandra; Mutandwa, Phillip; Muthusi, Steve; Ngabolo, Georgette; Oberfeld, Daniel; Papadatou-Pastou, Marietta; Perchtold, Corinna M.; Pérez-Albéniz, Alicia; Pouyan, Niloufar; Rashid Soron, Tanjir; Roinishvili, Maya; Romanyuk, Lyudmyla; Salgado Montejo, Alejandro; Sultanova, Aygun; Tau, Ramiro; Uusküla, Mari; Vainio, Suvi; Vargas-Soto, Veronica; Volkan, Eliz; Wąsowicz, Grażyna; Zdravković, Sunčica; Zhang, Meng; Mohr, Christine (2019)
    Across cultures, people associate colours with emotions. Here, we test the hypothesis that one driver of this cross-modal correspondence is the physical environment we live in. We focus on a prime example – the association of yellow with joy, – which conceivably arises because yellow is reminiscent of life-sustaining sunshine and pleasant weather. If so, this association should be especially strong in countries where sunny weather is a rare occurrence. We analysed yellow-joy associations of 6625 participants from 55 countries to investigate how yellow-joy associations varied geographically, climatologically, and seasonally. We assessed the distance to the equator, sunshine, precipitation, and daytime hours. Consistent with our hypotheses, participants who live further away from the equator and in rainier countries are more likely to associate yellow with joy. We did not find associations with seasonal variations. Our findings support a role for the physical environment in shaping the affective meaning of colour.