Browsing by Subject "Congenital abdominal wall defect"

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  • Raitio, Arimatias; Syvänen, Johanna; Tauriainen, Asta; Hyvarinen, Anna; Sankilampi, Ulla; Gissler, Mika; Helenius, Ilkka (2021)
    Purpose Several studies have reported high prevalence of undescended testis (UDT) among boys with congenital abdominal wall defects (AWD). Due to rarity of AWDs, however, true prevalence of testicular maldescent among these boys is not known. We conducted a national register study to determine the prevalence of UDT among Finnish males with an AWD. Methods All male infants with either gastroschisis or omphalocele born between Jan 1, 1998 and Dec 31, 2015 were identified in the Register of Congenital Malformations. The data on all performed operations were acquired from the Care Register for Health Care. The register data were examined for relevant UDT diagnosis and operation codes. Results We identified 99 males with gastroschisis and 89 with omphalocele. UDT was diagnosed in 10 (10.1%) infants with gastroschisis and 22 (24.7%) with omphalocele. Majority of these required an operation; 8/99 (8.1%) gastroschisis and 19/89 (21.3%) omphalocele patients. UDT is more common among AWD patients than general population with the highest prevalence in omphalocele. Conclusions Cryptorchidism is more common among boys with an AWD than general population. Furthermore, omphalocele carries significantly higher risk of UDT and need for orchidopexy than gastroschisis. Due to high prevalence testicular maldescent, careful follow-up for UDT is recommended.
  • Raitio, Arimatias; Syvänen, Johanna; Tauriainen, Asta; Hyvärinen, Anna; Sankilampi, Ulla; Gissler, Mika; Helenius, Ilkka (2021)
    Congenital abdominal wall defects, namely, gastroschisis and omphalocele, are rare congenital malformations with significant morbidity. The long-term burden of these anomalies to families and health care providers has not previously been assessed. We aimed to determine the need for hospital admissions and the requirement for surgery after initial admission at birth. For our analyses, we identified all infants with either gastroschisis (n=178) or omphalocele (n=150) born between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2014, in the Register of Congenital Malformations. The data on all hospital admissions and operations performed were acquired from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register between Jan 1, 1998, and Dec 31, 2015, and compared to data on the whole Finnish pediatric population (0.9 million) live born 1993-2008. Patients with gastroschisis and particularly those with omphalocele required hospital admissions 1.8 to 5.7 times more than the general pediatric population (p Conclusion: Patients with gastroschisis and especially those with omphalocele, are significantly more likely than the general pediatric population to require hospital care. Nevertheless, almost half of the patients can be treated without further surgery, and redo abdominal surgery is only required in a third of these children. What is Known: Gastroschisis and omphalocele are congenital malformations with significant morbidity There are no reports on the long-term need for hospital admissions and surgery in these children What is New: Patients with abdominal wall defects are significantly more likely than the general pediatric population to require hospital care Almost half of the patients can be treated without further surgery, and abdominal redo operations are only required in a third of these children