Browsing by Subject "Contact"

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  • Kauppila, Timo; Eriksson, Johan G.; Honkasalo, Mikko; Raina, Marko; Laine, Merja K. (2019)
    Aim: Previous study findings have shown that more frequent contacts with the diabetes care team predict better diabetes control. It is unknown whether this is true also for previous dropouts with type 2 diabetes (T2D). The aim of this study was to evaluate if those previous dropouts with T2D who succeeded to improve their glycaemic control had more frequent contacts with health care professionals in the public primary diabetes health care system than those dropouts who did not show improvement. Methods: In this "real life" retrospective cohort study, we identified 115 dropouts with T2D who were contacted by trained diabetes nurses and who returned to a public T2D-care system. Those previous dropouts who had baseline haemoglobin A(1c) >= 53 mmoVmol (7%) and had a reduction in HbA(1c) >= 6 mmol/mol (0.5%) during the follow-up were compared with those with unsatisfactory change in HbA(1c) (baseline HbA(1c) >= 53 mmoVmol and change Results: Previous dropouts showing improvement had more visits to the diabetes nurse (p = 0.003) and other nurses (p <0.001) than those with no improvement or those with satisfactory glycaemic control. Telephone calls not focusing on diabetes (p <0.001) were also more frequent among previous dropouts with improvement than among the others. Conclusions: Especially previous dropouts with T2D who had poor glycaemic control, may benefit from more frequent contacts including visits and telephone calls. Recalling dropouts does not seem to lead to overuse of the T2D care-system by those recalled patients whose glycaemic control does not require special care. (C) 2019 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Tolvi, Morag; Tuominen-Salo, Hanna; Paavola, Mika; Mattila, Kimmo; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Lehtonen, Lasse (2020)
    Background While previous studies have evaluated the effect of some patient characteristics (e.g. gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class and comorbidity) on outcome in orthopedic and hand day surgery, more detailed information on anesthesia related factors has previously been lacking. Our goal was to investigate the perioperative factors that affect overstay, readmission and contact after day surgery in order to find certain patient profiles more prone to problemed outcomes after day surgery. Methods We examined orthopedic and hand day surgery at an orthopedic day surgery unit of Helsinki University Hospital. Patient data of all adult orthopedic and hand day surgery patients (n = 542) over a 3-month period (January 1 - March 31, 2015) operated on at the unit were collected retrospectively using the hospital's surgery database. These data comprised anesthesia and patient records with a follow-up period of 30 days post-operation. Patients under the age of 16 and patients not eligible for day surgery were excluded. Patient records were searched for an outcome of overstay, readmission or contact with the emergency room or policlinic. Pearson chi-square test, Fischer's exact test and multivariable logistic regression were used to analyze the effect of various perioperative factors on postoperative outcome. Results Various patient and anesthesia related factors were examined for their significance in the outcomes of overstay, readmission or contact. Female gender (p = 0.043), total amount of fentanyl (p = 0.00), use of remifentanil (p = 0.036), other pain medication during procedure (p = 0.005) and administration of antiemetic medication (p = 0.048) emerged as statistically significant on outcome after day surgery. Conclusions Overstay and readmission in orthopedic and hand day surgery were clearly connected with female patients undergoing general anesthesia and needing larger amounts of intraoperative opioids. By favoring local and regional anesthesia, side effects of general anesthesia, as well as recovery time, will decrease.
  • Tolvi, Morag; Tuominen-Salo, Hanna; Paavola, Mika; Mattila, Kimmo; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Lehtonen, Lasse (BioMed Central, 2020)
    Abstract Background While previous studies have evaluated the effect of some patient characteristics (e.g. gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class and comorbidity) on outcome in orthopedic and hand day surgery, more detailed information on anesthesia related factors has previously been lacking. Our goal was to investigate the perioperative factors that affect overstay, readmission and contact after day surgery in order to find certain patient profiles more prone to problemed outcomes after day surgery. Methods We examined orthopedic and hand day surgery at an orthopedic day surgery unit of Helsinki University Hospital. Patient data of all adult orthopedic and hand day surgery patients (n = 542) over a 3-month period (January 1 – March 31, 2015) operated on at the unit were collected retrospectively using the hospital’s surgery database. These data comprised anesthesia and patient records with a follow-up period of 30 days post-operation. Patients under the age of 16 and patients not eligible for day surgery were excluded. Patient records were searched for an outcome of overstay, readmission or contact with the emergency room or policlinic. Pearson chi-square test, Fischer’s exact test and multivariable logistic regression were used to analyze the effect of various perioperative factors on postoperative outcome. Results Various patient and anesthesia related factors were examined for their significance in the outcomes of overstay, readmission or contact. Female gender (p = 0.043), total amount of fentanyl (p = 0.00), use of remifentanil (p = 0.036), other pain medication during procedure (p = 0.005) and administration of antiemetic medication (p = 0.048) emerged as statistically significant on outcome after day surgery. Conclusions Overstay and readmission in orthopedic and hand day surgery were clearly connected with female patients undergoing general anesthesia and needing larger amounts of intraoperative opioids. By favoring local and regional anesthesia, side effects of general anesthesia, as well as recovery time, will decrease.