Browsing by Subject "DATA SET"

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  • Marjakangas, Emma-Liina; Abrego, Nerea; Grøtan, Vidar; de Lima, Renato A. F.; Bello, Carolina; Bovendorp, Ricardo S.; Culot, Laurence; Hasui, Érica; Lima, Fernando; Muylaert, Renata Lara; Niebuhr, Bernardo Brandão; Oliveira, Alexandre A.; Pereira, Lucas Augusto; Prado, Paulo I.; Stevens, Richard D.; Vancine, Maurício Humberto; Ribeiro, Milton Cezar; Galetti, Mauro; Ovaskainen, Otso (2020)
    Abstract Aim Forest fragmentation is among the principal causes of global biodiversity loss, yet how it affects mutualistic interactions between plants and animals at large spatial scale is poorly understood. In particular, tropical forest regeneration depends on animal-mediated seed dispersal, but the seed-dispersing animals face rapid decline due to forest fragmentation and defaunation. Here, we assess how fragmentation influences the pairwise interactions between 407 seed disperser and 1,424 tree species in a highly fragmented biodiversity hotspot. Location Atlantic Forest, South America. Methods We predicted interaction networks in 912 sites covering the entire biome by combining verified interaction data with co-occurrence probabilities obtained from a spatially explicit joint species distribution model. We identified keystone seed dispersers by computing a species-specific keystone index and by selecting those species belonging to the top 5% quantile. Results We show that forest fragmentation affects seed dispersal interactions negatively, and the decreased area of functionally connected forest, rather than increased edge effects, is the main driver behind the loss of interactions. Both the seed disperser availability for the local tree communities and in particular the proportion of interactions provided by keystone seed dispersers decline with increasing degree of fragmentation. Importantly, just 21 keystone species provided >40% of all interactions. The numbers of interactions provided by keystone and non-keystone species, however, were equally negatively affected by fragmentation, suggesting that seed dispersal interactions may not be rewired under strong fragmentation effects. Conclusions We highlight the importance of understanding the fragmentation-induced compositional shifts in seed disperser communities as they may lead to lagged and multiplicative effects on tree communities. Our results illustrate the utility of model-based prediction of interaction networks as well as model-based identification of keystone species as a tool for prioritizing conservation efforts. Similar modelling approaches could be applied to other threatened ecosystems and interaction types globally.
  • Pavicic, M.; Wang, F.; Mouhu, K.; Himanen, K. (2019)
    Seed quality is an important factor for seedling vigour as well as adult plant resilience. The key quality attributes are related to physical characteristics, physiological performance, genetic background and health status of the seeds. Many ways to address seed quality attributes have been developed and recently many of them have featured automated high throughput methods. In our study, we addressed two of the seed quality attributes, namely physiological performance and genetic background by analysing germination rates in our mutant collection. These mutants represent ubiquitin E3 ligases that transcriptionally respond to abscisic acid (ABA). This plant hormone is an important regulator of germination and seedling establishment. To facilitate in vitro germination screens of large seed collections a high throughput image-based assay was developed. As a read out of the germination on ABA treatment the cotyledon emergence was detected with top view chlorophyll fluorescence camera. By applying the ABA treatment during germination, RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase mutants were identified, showing either resistant or sensitive responses to ABA. In conclusion, a scalable high throughput screen for in vitro germination assay was established that allowed fast screening of tens of mutants in a hormone supplemented media.
  • Kerches-Rogeri, Patricia; Ramos, Danielle Leal; Siren, Jukka; Teles, Beatriz de Oliveira; Cruz Alves, Rafael Souza; Priante, Camila Fatima; Ribeiro, Milton Cezar; Araujo, Marcio Silva; Ovaskainen, Otso (2021)
    Background There is growing evidence that individuals within populations can vary in both habitat use and movement behavior, but it is still not clear how these two relate to each other. The aim of this study was to test if and how individual bats in a Stunira lilium population differ in their movement activity and preferences for landscape features in a correlated manner. Methods We collected data on movements of 27 individuals using radio telemetry. We fitted a heterogeneous-space diffusion model to the movement data in order to evaluate signals of movement variation among individuals. Results S. lilium individuals generally preferred open habitat with Solanum fruits, regularly switched between forest and open areas, and showed high site fidelity. Movement variation among individuals could be summarized in four movement syndromes: (1) average individuals, (2) forest specialists, (3) explorers which prefer Piper, and (4) open area specialists which prefer Solanum and Cecropia. Conclusions Individual preferences for landscape features plus food resource and movement activity were correlated, resulting in different movement syndromes. Individual variation in preferences for landscape elements and food resources highlight the importance of incorporating explicitly the interaction between landscape structure and individual heterogeneity in descriptions of animal movement.