Browsing by Subject "DENDRITIC CELLS"

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  • Guenther, Carla; Faisal, Imrul; Uotila, Liisa; Llort Asens, Marc; Harjunpää, Heidi; Savinko, Terhi; Öhman, Tiina; Yao, Sean; Moser, Markus; Morris, Stephan W.; Tojkander, Sari; Fagerholm, Susanna (2019)
    beta2-integrins are essential for immune system function because they mediate immune cell adhesion and signaling. Consequently, a loss of beta2-integrin expression or function causes the immunodeficiency disorders, Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (LAD) type I and III. LAD-III is caused by mutations in an important integrin regulator, kindlin-3, but exactly how kindlin-3 regulates leukocyte adhesion has remained incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that mutation of the kindlin-3 binding site in the b2-integrin (TTT/AAA-b2-integrin knock-in mouse/KI) abolishes activation of the actin-regulated myocardin related transcription factor A/serum response factor (MRTF-A/SRF) signaling pathway in dendritic cells and MRTF-A/SRF-dependent gene expression. We show that Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) activation and filamentous-actin (F-actin) polymerization is abolished in murine TTT/AAA-b2-integrin KI dendritic cells, which leads to a failure ofMRTF-A to localize to the cell nucleus to coactivate genes together with SRF. In addition, we show that dendritic cell gene expression, adhesion and integrin-mediated traction forces on ligand coated surfaces is dependent on the MRTF-A/SRF signaling pathway. The participation of b2-integrin and kindlin-3-mediated cell adhesion in the regulation of the ubiquitous MRTF-A/SRF signaling pathway in immune cells may help explain the role of b2-integrin and kindlin-3 in integrin-mediated gene regulation and immune system function.
  • Havunen, Riikka; Santos, Joao M.; Sorsa, Suvi; Rantapero, Tommi; Lumen, Dave; Siurala, Mikko; Airaksinen, Anu J.; Cervera-Carrascon, Victor; Tähtinen, Siri; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2018)
    Cancer treatment with local administration of armed oncolytic viruses could potentially induce systemic antitumor effects, or the abscopal effect, as they self-amplify in tumors, induce danger signaling, and promote tumor-associated antigen presentation. In this study, oncolytic adenovirus coding for human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 (also known as [a.k.a.] TILT-123) provoked antitumor efficacy in tumors that were injected with Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 and those that were left non-injected in the same animal. Importantly, the virus was able to travel to distant tumors. To dissect the effects of oncolysis and cytokines, we studied replication-incompetent viruses in mice. Systemic antitumor effects were similar in both models, highlighting the importance of the arming device. The cytokines induced positive changes in immune cell infiltrates and induced the expression of several immune-reaction-related genes in tumors. In addition, Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 was able to increase homing of adoptively transferred tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes into both injected and non-injected tumors, possibly mediated through chemokine expression. In summary, local treatment with Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNF-alpha-IRES-hIL-2 resulted in systemic antitumor efficacy by inducing immune cell infiltration and trafficking into both treated and untreated tumors. Moreover, the oncolytic adenovirus platform had superior systemic effects over replication-deficient vector through spreading into distant tumors.
  • Saellstrom, Sara; Sadeghi, Arian; Eriksson, Emma; Segall, Thomas; Dimopoulou, Maria; Korsgren, Olle; Loskog, Angelica SI.; Totterman, Thomas H.; Hemminki, Akseli; Ronnberg, Henrik (2021)
    Malignant melanoma is a serious disease in both humans and dogs, and the high metastatic potential results in poor prognosis for many patients. Its similarities with human melanoma make spontaneous canine melanoma an excellent model for comparative studies of novel therapies and tumor biology. Gene therapy using adenoviruses encoding the immunostimulatory gene CD40L (AdCD40L) has shown promise in initial clinical trials enrolling human patients with various malignancies including melanoma. We report a study of local AdCD40L treatment in 32 cases of canine melanoma (23 oral, 5 cutaneous, 3 ungual and 1 conjunctival). Eight patients were World Health Organization (WHO) stage I, 9 were stage II, 12 stage III, and 3 stage IV. One to six intratumoral injections of AdCD40L were given every seven days, combined with cytoreductive surgery in 20 cases and only immunotherapy in 12 cases. Tumor tissue was infiltrated with T and B lymphocytes after treatment, suggesting immune stimulation. The best overall response based on result of immunotherapy included 7 complete responses, 5 partial responses, 5 stable and 2 progressive disease statuses according to the World Health Organization response criteria. Median survival was 285 days (range 20-3435 d). Our results suggest that local AdCD40L therapy is safe and could have beneficial effects in dogs, supporting further treatment development. Clinical translation to human patients is ongoing.
  • Rademakers, Timo; van der Vorst, Emiel P. C.; Daissormont, Isabelle T. M. N.; Otten, Jeroen J. T.; Theodorou, Kosta; Theelen, Thomas L.; Gijbels, Marion; Anisimov, Andrey; Nurmi, Harri; Lindeman, Jan H. N.; Schober, Andreas; Heeneman, Sylvia; Alitalo, Kari; Biessen, Erik A. L. (2017)
    During plaque progression, inflammatory cells progressively accumulate in the adventitia, paralleled by an increased presence of leaky vasa vasorum. We here show that next to vasa vasorum, also the adventitial lymphatic capillary bed is expanding during plaque development in humans and mouse models of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we investigated the role of lymphatics in atherosclerosis progression. Dissection of plaque draining lymph node and lymphatic vessel in atherosclerotic ApoE(-/-)mice aggravated plaque formation, which was accompanied by increased intimal and adventitial CD3(+) T cell numbers. Likewise, inhibition of VEGF-C/D dependent lymphangiogenesis by AAV aided gene transfer of hVEGFR3-Ig fusion protein resulted in CD3(+) T cell enrichment in plaque intima and adventitia. hVEGFR3-Ig gene transfer did not compromise adventitial lymphatic density, pointing to VEGF-C/D independent lymphangiogenesis. We were able to identify the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis, which has previously been shown to indirectly activate VEGFR3, as a likely pathway, in that its focal silencing attenuated lymphangiogenesis and augmented T cell presence. Taken together, our study not only shows profound, partly CXCL12/CXCR4 mediated, expansion of lymph capillaries in the adventitia of atherosclerotic plaque in humans and mice, but also is the first to attribute an important role of lymphatics in plaque T cell accumulation and development.
  • Liu, Xingzhi; Zhang, Hongbo; Cheng, Ruoyu; Gu, Yanzheng; Yin, Yin; Sun, Zhiyong; Pan, Guoqing; Deng, Zhongbin; Yang, Huilin; Deng, Lianfu; Cui, Wenguo; Almeida Santos, Helder; Shi, Qin (2018)
    Antibody-based cancer immune therapy has attracted lots of research interest in recent years; however, it is greatly limited by the easy distribution and burst release of antibodies. In addition, after the clearance of the tissue, healthy tissue regeneration is another challenge for cancer treatment. Herein, we have developed a specific immunological tissue engineering scaffold using the agonistic mouse anti-human CD40 antibody (CD40mAb) incorporated into poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) electrospun fibers through the dopamine (PDA) motif (PLLA-PDA-CD40mAb). CD40mAb is successfully incorporated onto the surface of the electrospun fibrous scaffold, which is proved by immunofluorescence staining, and the PLLA-PDA-CD40mAb scaffold has an anti-tumor effect by locally releasing CD40mAb. Therefore, this immunological electrospun scaffold has very good potential to be developed as a powerful tool for localized tumor treatment, and this is the first to be reported in this area.
  • Windbichler, Katharina; Michalopoulou, Eleni; Palamides, Pia; Pesch, Theresa; Jelinek, Christine; Vapalahti, Olli; Kipar, Anja; Hetzel, Udo; Hepojoki, Jussi (2019)
    Boid Inclusion Body Disease (BIBD) is a potentially fatal disease reported in captive boid snakes worldwide that is caused by reptarenavirus infection. Although the detection of intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IB) in blood cells serves as the gold standard for the ante mortem diagnosis of BIBD, the mechanisms underlying IB formation and the pathogenesis of BIBD are unknown. Knowledge on the reptile immune system is sparse compared to the mammalian counterpart, and in particular the response towards reptarenavirus infection is practically unknown. Herein, we investigated a breeding collection of 70 Boa constrictor snakes for BIBD, reptarenavirus viraemia, anti-reptarenavirus IgM and IgY antibodies, and population parameters. Using NGS and RT-PCR on pooled blood samples of snakes with and without BIBD, we could identify three different reptarenavirus S segments in the collection. The examination of individual samples by RT-PCR indicated that the presence of University of Giessen virus (UGV)-like S segment strongly correlates with IB formation. We could also demonstrate a negative correlation between BIBD and the presence of anti-UGV NP IgY antibodies. Further evidence of an association between antibody response and BIBD is the finding that the level of anti-reptarenavirus antibodies measured by ELISA was lower in snakes with BIBD. Furthermore, female snakes had a significantly lower body weight when they had BIBD. Taken together our findings suggest that the detection of the UGV-/S6-like S segment and the presence of anti-reptarenavirus IgY antibodies might serve as a prognostic tool for predicting the development of BIBD.
  • Hetemaki, Iivo; Jarva, Hanna; Kluger, Nicolas; Baldauf, Hanna-Mari; Laakso, Sini; Bratland, Eirik; Husebye, Eystein S.; Kisand, Kai; Ranki, Annamari; Peterson, Part; Arstila, T. Petteri (2016)
    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a monogenic autoimmune disease caused by mutations in the AIRE gene. Although mainly an endocrine disease, a substantial fraction of patients have gastrointestinal manifestations. In this study, we have examined the role of anticommensal responses and their regulation. APECED patients had increased levels of Abs against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (p <0.0001) and against several species of commensal gut bacteria, but not against species predominantly associated with other locations. The anticommensal Ab levels did not correlate with gastrointestinal autoantibodies, neutralizing anti-IL-17 or -IL-22 Abs, or gastrointestinal symptoms, although scarcity of the available clinical data suggests that further study is required. However, the anti-S. cerevisiae Ab levels showed a significant inverse correlation with FOXP3 expression levels in regulatory T cells (Treg), previously shown to be dysfunctional in APECED. The correlation was strongest in the activated CD45RO(+) population (rho = 20.706; p <0.01). APECED patients also had decreased numbers of FOXP3(+) cells in gut biopsies. These results show that APECED patients develop early and sustained responses to gut microbial Ags in a pattern reminiscent of Crohn's disease. This abnormal immune recognition of gut commensals is linked to a systemic Treg defect, which is also reflected as a local decrease of gut-associated Treg. To our knowledge, these data are the first to show dysregulated responses to non-self commensal Ags in APECED and indicate that AIRE contributes to the regulation of gut homeostasis, at least indirectly. The data also raise the possibility of persistent microbial stimulation as a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of APECED.
  • Fagerholm, Susanna C.; Guenther, Carla; Asens, Marc Llort; Savinko, Terhi; Uotila, Liisa M. (2019)
    Beta2-integrins are complex leukocyte-specific adhesion molecules that are essential for leukocyte (e.g., neutrophil, lymphocyte) trafficking, as well as for other immunological processes such as neutrophil phagocytosis and ROS production, and T cell activation. Intriguingly, however, they have also been found to negatively regulate cytokine responses, maturation, and migratory responses in myeloid cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, revealing new, and unexpected roles of these molecules in immunity. Because of their essential role in leukocyte function, a lack of expression or function of beta2-integrins causes rare immunodeficiency syndromes, Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I, and type III (LAD-I and LAD-III). LAD-I is caused by reduced or lost expression of beta2-integrins, whilst in LAD-III, beta2-integrins are expressed but dysfunctional because a major integrin cytoplasmic regulator, kindlin-3, is mutated. Interestingly, some LAD-related phenotypes such as periodontitis have recently been shown to be due to an uncontrolled inflammatory response rather than to an uncontrolled infection, as was previously thought. This review will focus on the recent advances concerning the regulation and functions of beta2-integrins in leukocyte trafficking, immune suppression, and immune deficiency disease.
  • Eichin, Dominik; Pessia, Alberto; Takeda, Akira; Laakkonen, Joni; Bellmann, Lydia; Kankainen, Matti; Imhof, Beat A.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Tang, Jing; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa (2021)
    CD73 is an important ectoenzyme responsible for the production of extracellular adenosine. It is involved in regulating inflammatory responses and cell migration and is overexpressed in various cancers. The functions of CD73 in blood endothelial cells are understood in detail, but its role on afferent lymphatics remains unknown. Moreover, anti‐CD73 antibodies are now used in multiple clinical cancer trials, but their effects on different endothelial cell types have not been studied. This study reveals that a previously unknown role of CD73 on afferent lymphatics is to dampen immune responses. Knocking it out or suppressing it by siRNA leads to the upregulation of inflammation‐associated genes on lymphatic endothelial cells and a more pro‐inflammatory phenotype of interacting dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo. In striking contrast, anti‐CD73 antibodies had only negligible effects on the gene expression of lymphatic‐ and blood‐endothelial cells. Our data thus reveal new functions of lymphatic CD73 and indicate a low likelihood of endothelial cell–related adverse effects by CD73 targeting therapeutic antibodies.
  • Jahromi, Leila Pourtalebi; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Maleki, Aziz; Azadi, Amir; Santos, Helder A. (2021)
    Over the past decades, considerable attention has been dedicated to the exploitation of diverse immune cells as therapeutic and/or diagnostic cell-based microrobots for hard-to-treat disorders. To date, a plethora of therapeutics based on alive immune cells, surface-engineered immune cells, immunocytes' cell membranes, leukocyte-derived extracellular vesicles or exosomes, and artificial immune cells have been investigated and a few have been introduced into the market. These systems take advantage of the unique characteristics and functions of immune cells, including their presence in circulating blood and various tissues, complex crosstalk properties, high affinity to different self and foreign markers, unique potential of their on-demand navigation and activity, production of a variety of chemokines/cytokines, as well as being cytotoxic in particular conditions. Here, the latest progress in the development of engineered therapeutics and diagnostics inspired by immune cells to ameliorate cancer, inflammatory conditions, autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular complications, and infectious diseases is reviewed, and finally, the perspective for their clinical application is delineated.
  • Kaustio, Meri; Haapaniemi, Emma; Göös, Helka; Hautala, Timo; Park, Giljun; Syrjänen, Jaana; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Sahu, Biswajyoti; Kilpinen, Sanna; Rounioja, Samuli; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Glumoff, Virpi; Kulmala, Petri; Katayama, Shintaro; Tamene, Fitsum; Trotta, Luca; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Krjutskov, Kaarel; Nurmi, Katariina; Eklund, Kari; Lagerstedt, Anssi; Helminen, Merja; Martelius, Timi; Mustjoki, Satu; Taipale, Jussi; Saarela, Janna; Kere, Juha; Varjosalo, Markku; Seppanen, Mikko (2017)
    Background: The nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-kappa B) signaling pathway is a key regulator of immune responses. Accordingly, mutations in several NF-kappa B pathway genes cause immunodeficiency. Objective: We sought to identify the cause of disease in 3 unrelated Finnish kindreds with variable symptoms of immunodeficiency and autoinflammation. Methods: We applied genetic linkage analysis and next-generation sequencing and functional analyses of NFKB1 and its mutated alleles. Results: In all affected subjects we detected novel heterozygous variants in NFKB1, encoding for p50/p105. Symptoms in variant carriers differed depending on the mutation. Patients harboring a p.I553M variant presented with antibody deficiency, infection susceptibility, and multiorgan autoimmunity. Patients with a p.H67R substitution had antibody deficiency and experienced autoinflammatory episodes, including aphthae, gastrointestinal disease, febrile attacks, and small-vessel vasculitis characteristic of Behc, et disease. Patients with a p.R157X stop-gain experienced hyperinflammatory responses to surgery and showed enhanced inflammasome activation. In functional analyses the p.R157X variant caused proteasome-dependent degradation of both the truncated and wild-type proteins, leading to a dramatic loss of p50/p105. The p.H67R variant reduced nuclear entry of p50 and showed decreased transcriptional activity in luciferase reporter assays. The p.I553M mutation in turn showed no change in p50 function but exhibited reduced p105 phosphorylation and stability. Affinity purification mass spectrometry also demonstrated that both missense variants led to altered protein-protein interactions. Conclusion: Our findings broaden the scope of phenotypes caused by mutations in NFKB1 and suggest that a subset of autoinflammatory diseases, such as Behcet disease, can be caused by rare monogenic variants in genes of the NF-kappa B pathway.
  • Lahtela, Elisa; Kankainen, Matti; Sinisalo, Juha; Selroos, Olof; Lokki, Marja-Liisa (2019)
    Many sarcoidosis-associating immunological genes have been shown to be shared between other immune-mediated diseases. In Finnish sarcoidosis patients, good prognosis subjects more commonly have HLA-DRB1*03:01 and/or HLA-DRB1*04:01-DPB1*04:01 haplotype, but no marker for persistent disease have been found. The objective was to further pinpoint genetic differences between prognosis subgroups in relation to the HLA markers. Whole-exome sequencing was conducted for 72 patients selected based on disease activity (resolved disease, n = 36; persistent disease, n = 36). Both groups were further divided by the HLA markers (one/both markers, n = 18; neither of the markers, n = 18). The Finnish exome data from the Genome Aggregation Database was used as a control population in the WES sample. Statistical analyses included single-variant analysis for common variants and gene level analysis for rare variants. We attempted to replicate associated variants in 181 Finnish sarcoidosis patients and 150 controls. An association was found in chromosome 1p36.21 (AADACL3 and C1orf158), which has recently been associated with sarcoidosis in another WES study. In our study, variations in these genes were associated with resolved disease (AADACL3, p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0003; C1orf158, p = 7.03E-05). Another interesting chromosomal region also peaked, Leucocyte Receptor Complex in 19q13.42, but the association diminished in the replication sample. In conclusion, this WES study supports the previously found association in the region 1p36.21. Furthermore, a novel to sarcoidosis region was found, but additional studies are warranted to verify this association.
  • Niittyvuopio, Riitta; Juvonen, Eeva; Heiskanen, Jouni; Lindstrom, Vesa; Nihtinen, Anne; Sahlstedt, Leila; Volin, Liisa (2018)
    BACKGROUND: Steroid-refractory acute graft-versushost disease (aGVHD) is a serious complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The long-term outcome of the patients is poor. Various immunosuppressive agents have been proposed as the second-line therapy but none of them has turned out more effective than the others. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is a treatment option that does not predispose the patients to severe side effects of the immunosuppressive drugs. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed the treatment results of ECP in 52 patients with steroidrefractory or steroid-dependent aGVHD. Eighty-one percent of the patients suffered from a severe, Grade III or IV, aGVHD. ECP was started alone as the second-line treatment in 23 patients and in combination with an immunosuppressive drug in 18 patients. Eleven patients received ECP as the third-line or later treatment. RESULTS: A total of 62% of the patients responded, with 48% achieving complete response. In the patients with complete or partial response, the probabilities of survival at 4 years were 54 and 17%, respectively. The outcome of nonresponders was poor. The 1-year overall survivals of the patients with ECP as the second-line treatment either alone or in combination with an immunosuppressive drug or as the third-line treatment were 51, 28, and 18%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, starting ECP no later than 10 days after the start of the first-line treatment correlated with a good response and a consequent survival benefit. CONCLUSION: Extracorporeal photopheresis is an effective and well-tolerated treatment that should be considered as a second-line treatment for aGVHD.
  • Tahtinen, Siri; Kaikkonen, Saija; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Gronberg-Vaha-Koskela, Susanna; Kanerva, Anna; Parviainen, Suvi; Vaha-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli (2015)
    Unfavorable ratios between the number and activation status of effector and suppressor immune cells infiltrating the tumor contribute to resistance of solid tumors to T-cell based therapies. Here, we studied the capacity of FDA and EMA approved recombinant cytokines to manipulate this balance in favor of efficient anti-tumor responses in B16. OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. Intratumoral administration of IFN-alpha 2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-2 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T-cell (OT-I) therapy, whereas GM-CSF increased tumor growth in association with an increase in immunosuppressive cell populations. None of the cytokines augmented tumor trafficking of OT-I cells significantly, but injections of IFN-alpha 2, IFN-gamma and IL-2 increased intratumoral cytokine secretion and recruitment of endogenous immune cells capable of stimulating T-cells, such as natural killer and maturated CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IFN-alpha 2 and IL-2 increased the levels of activated tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells concomitant with reduction in the CD8+ T-cell expression of anergy markers CTLA-4 and PD-1. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of IFN-alpha 2, IFN-gamma and IL-2 can lead to immune sensitization of the established tumor, whereas GM-CSF may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. The results described here provide rationale for including local administration of immunostimulatory cytokines into T-cell therapy regimens. One appealing embodiment of this would be vectored delivery which could be advantageous over direct injection of recombinant molecules with regard to efficacy, cost, persistence and convenience.
  • Lorey, Martina B.; Rossi, Katriina; Eklund, Kari; Nyman, Tuula A.; Matikainen, Sampsa (2017)
    Gram-negative bacteria are associated with a wide spectrum of infectious diseases in humans. Inflammasomes are cytosolic protein complexes that are assembled when the cell encounters pathogens or other harmful agents. The non-canonical caspase-4/5 inflammasome is activated by Gram-negative bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and by endogenous oxidized phospholipids. Protein secretion is a critical component of the innate immune response. Here, we have used label-free quantitative proteomics to characterize global protein secretion in response to non-canonical inflammasome activation upon intracellular LPS recognition in human primary macrophages. Before proteomics, the total secretome was separated into two fractions, enriched extracellular vesicle (EV) fraction and rest-secretome (RS) fraction using size-exclusion centrifugation. We identified 1048 proteins from the EV fraction and 1223 proteins from the RS fraction. From these, 640 were identified from both fractions suggesting that the non-canonical inflammasome activates multiple, partly overlapping protein secretion pathways. We identified several secreted proteins that have a critical role in host response against severe Gram-negative bacterial infection. The soluble secretome (RS fraction) was highly enriched with inflammation-associated proteins upon intracellular LPS recognition. Several ribosomal proteins were highly abundant in the EV fraction upon infection, and our data strongly suggest that secretion of translational machinery and concomitant inhibition of translation are important parts of host response against Gram-negative bacteria sensing caspase-4/5 inflammasome. Intracellular recognition of LPS resulted in the secretion of two metalloproteinases, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10) and MMP14, in the enriched EV fraction. ADAM10 release was associated with the secretion of TNF, a key inflammatory cytokine, and M-CSF, an important growth factor for myeloid cells probably through ADAM10-dependent membrane shedding of these cytokines. Caspase-4/5 inflammasome activation also resulted in secretion of danger-associated molecules S100A8 and prothymosin- in the enriched EV fraction. Both S100A8 and prothymosin- are ligands for toll-like receptor 4 recognizing extracellular LPS, and they may contribute to endotoxic shock during non-canonical inflammasome activation.
  • Yang, Kun; Park, Chae G.; Cheong, Cheolho; Bulgheresi, Silvia; Zhang, Shusheng; Zhang, Pei; He, Yingxia; Jiang, Lingyu; Huang, Hongping; Ding, Honghui; Wu, Yiping; Wang, Shaogang; Zhang, Lin; Li, Anyi; Xia, Lianxu; Bartra, Sara S.; Plano, Gregory V.; Skurnik, Mikael; Klena, John D.; Chen, Tie (2015)
    Yersinia pestis is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes plague. After Y. pestis overcomes the skin barrier, it encounters antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as Langerhans and dendritic cells. They transport the bacteria from the skin to the lymph nodes. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial transmission are unclear. Langerhans cells (LCs) express Langerin (CD207), a calcium-dependent (C-type) lectin. Furthermore, Y. pestis possesses exposed core oligosaccharides. In this study, we show that Y. pestis invades LCs and Langerin-expressing transfectants. However, when the bacterial core oligosaccharides are shielded or truncated, Y. pestis propensity to invade Langerhans and Langerin-expressing cells decreases. Moreover, the interaction of Y. pestis with Langerin-expressing transfectants is inhibited by purified Langerin, a DC-SIGN (DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 grabbing nonintegrin)-like molecule, an anti-CD207 antibody, purified core oligosaccharides and several oligosaccharides. Furthermore, covering core oligosaccharides reduces the mortality associated with murine infection by adversely affecting the transmission of Y. pestis to lymph nodes. These results demonstrate that direct interaction of core oligosaccharides with Langerin facilitates the invasion of LCs by Y. pestis. Therefore, Langerin-mediated binding of Y. pestis to APCs may promote its dissemination and infection.
  • Rahikkala, Antti; Fontana, Flavia; Bauleth-Ramos, Tomás; Rebelo Correia, Alexandra Maria; Kemell, Marianna; Seitsonen, Jani; Mäkilä, Ermei; Sarmento, Bruno; Salonen, Jarno; Ruokolainen, Janne; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A. (2020)
    Erythrocyte-based drug delivery systems have been investigated for their biocompatibility, long circulation time, and capability to transport cargo all around the body, thus presenting enormous potential in medical applications. In this study, we investigated hybrid nanoparticles consisting of nano-sized autologous or allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) membranes encapsulating porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs). These NPs were functionalized with a model cancer antigen TRP2, which was either expressed on the surface of the RBCs by a cell membrane-mimicking block copolymer polydimethylsiloxane-b-poly-2-methyl-2-oxazoline, or attached on the PSi NPs, thus hidden within the encapsulation. When in the presence of peripheral blood immune cells, these NPs resulted in apoptotic cell death of T cells, where the NPs having TRP2 within the encapsulation led to a stronger T cell deletion. The deletion of the T cells did not change the relative proportion of CD4+ and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. Overall, this work shows the combination of nano-sized RBCs, PSi, and antigenic peptides may have use in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.
  • Malmström, Kristiina; Lohi, Jouko; Sajantila, Antti; Jahnsen, Frode L.; Kajosaari, Merja; Sarna, Seppo; Makela, Mika J. (2017)
    Background: Thickening of reticular basement membrane, increased airway smooth muscle mass and eosinophilic inflammation are found in adult fatal asthma. At the present study the histopathology of fatal paediatric and adolescent asthma is evaluated. Methods: Post-mortem lung autopsies from 12 fatal asthma cases and 8 non-asthmatic control subjects were examined. Thickness of reticular basement membrane (RBM) and percentage of airway smooth muscle (ASM%) mass area were measured and inflammatory cells were counted. Patient records were reviewed for clinical history. Results: The age range of the cases was from 0.9 to 19.5 years, eight were males and five had received inhaled corticosteroids. Thickened RBM was detected in majority of the cases without any correlation to treatment delay, age at onset of symptoms or diagnosis. In the large airways ASM was clearly increased in one third of the cases whereas the median ASM% did not differ from that in healthy controls (14.0% vs. 14.0%). In small airways no increase of ASM was found, instead mucous plugs were seen in fatal asthma. The number of eosinophils, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, macrophages, and B-cells were significantly increased in fatal asthma cases compared with controls and the two latter correlated with the length of the fatal exacerbation. Conclusions: The findings highlight the strong presence of eosinophils and mucous plugs even in small airways in children and adolescents with fatal asthma. Thickened RBM was obvious in majority of the patients. Contrary to our hypothesis, increased ASM% was detected in only one third of the patients.
  • Kortesoja, Maarit; Karhu, Elina; Olafsdottir, Elin Soffia; Freysdottir, Jona; Hanski, Leena (2019)
  • Jiang, Miao; Österlund, Pamela; Poranen, Minna; Julkunen, Ilkka (2020)
    Mammalian cells express different types of RNA molecules that can be classified as protein coding RNAs (mRNA) and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) the latter of which have housekeeping and regulatory functions in cells. Cellular RNAs are not recognized by cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and innate immunity is not activated. RNA viruses encode and express RNA molecules that usually differ from cell-specific RNAs and they include for instance 5'capped and 5-mono- and triphosphorylated RNAs, small viral RNAs and viral RNA-protein complexes called vRNPs. These molecules are recognized by certain members of Toll-like receptor (TLR) and RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) families leading to activation of innate immune responses and the production of antiviral cytokines, such as type I and type III interferons (IFNs). Virus-specific ssRNA and dsRNA molecules that mimic the viral genomic RNAs or their replication intermediates can efficiently be produced by bacteriophage T7 DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and bacteriophage phi6 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, respectively. These molecules can then be delivered into mammalian cells and the mechanisms of activation of innate immune responses can be studied. In addition, synthetic viral dsRNAs can be processed to small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by a Dicer enzyme to produce a swarm of antiviral siRNAs. Here we describe the biology of RNAs, their in vitro production and delivery into mammalian cells as well as how these molecules can be used to inhibit virus replication and to study the mechanisms of activation of the innate immune system.