Browsing by Subject "DESIRE"

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  • Tuominen, Leena; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Meretoja, Riitta (2020)
    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore comprehensively expectations of patients with colorectal cancer towards nursing care in the chemotherapy context. Methods: A purposive sample of patients with colorectal cancer (n = 15) was interviewed individually at the outpatient clinic in one university hospital chemotherapy unit. The data were analysed with thematic analysis. Results: Three main themes were identified in the data. Firstly, patients expected to be empowered with knowledge of disease process, side effects and their self-management and peer support. Secondly, patients expected to be humanely encountered, which included being encountered with support, compassion and hope. Thirdly, patients expected to be skillfully cared for with systematic assessment, expertise, continuity and advocacy. Conclusions: Besides reliable knowledge of cancer treatment and care, patients expected the sympathetic presence of a nurse whose professional skills they can trust. The results may be utilised in intervention development by focusing on themes significant to these patients. The results may help nurses to enhance person-centred care as well as to encounter patients according to their expectations.
  • Jayanti, Anuradha; Neuvonen, Markus; Wearden, Alison; Morris, Julie; Foden, Philip; Brenchley, Paul; Mitra, Sandip; BASIC-HHD Study Grp (2015)
    Background: Medical decision-making is critical to patient survival and well-being. Patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) are faced with incrementally complex decision-making throughout their treatment journey. The extent to which patients seek involvement in the decision-making process and factors which influence these in ESRD need to be understood. Methods: 535 ESRD patients were enrolled into the cross-sectional study arm and 30 patients who started dialysis were prospectively evaluated. Patients were enrolled into 3 groups-'predialysis' (group A), 'in-centre' haemodialysis (HD) (group B) and self-care HD (93 % at home-group C) from across five tertiary UK renal centres. The Autonomy Preference Index (API) has been employed to study patient preferences for information-seeking (IS) and decision-making (DM). Demographic, psychosocial and neuropsychometric assessments are considered for analyses. Results: 458 complete responses were available. API items have high internal consistency in the study population (Cronbach's alpha > 0.70). Overall and across individual study groups, the scores for information-seeking and decision-making are significantly different indicating that although patients had a strong preference to be well informed, they were more neutral in their preference to participate in DM (p <0.05). In the age, education and study group adjusted multiple linear regression analysis, lower age, female gender, marital status; higher API IS scores and white ethnicity background were significant predictors of preference for decision-making. DM scores were subdivided into tertiles to identify variables associated with high (DM > 70: and low DM ( Conclusion: ESRD patients prefer to receive information, but this does not always imply active involvement in decision-making. By understanding modifiable and non-modifiable factors which affect patient preferences for involvement in healthcare decision-making, health professionals may acknowledge the need to accommodate individual patient preferences to the extent determined by the individual patient factors.
  • Rommel, Carl Anders Truls (2018)
    This article explores men at a state-owned youth center in Cairo, struggling to cope with uncertainties and change in the aftermath of Egypt's January 2011 Revolution. Conceptually, the article critically engages anthropologist Laura Bear's suggestion that an ethics of productivity saturate neoliberal masculinity. As my ethnographic stories about football coaches and state bureaucrats illustrate, being a good man recurrently surfaced as a problem of how to work productively in and on time: as ambiguities between discordant futures that left material needs, familiar care, and development of football talents difficult to reconcile. Often, my interlocutors linked this conundrum to a wide-ranging opacity, conjured as corruption (fisad). My analysis of this male predicament allows me to spotlight one of the Egyptian revolution's most luring promises: a transparent and meritocratic system, where a man's work would finally be allowed to work on all futures deemed morally and materially significant.