Browsing by Subject "DIRECT-COUPLING ANALYSIS"

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  • Skwark, Marcin J.; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Puranen, Santeri; Chewapreecha, Claire; Pesonen, Maiju; Xu, Ying Ying; Turner, Paul; Harris, Simon R.; Beres, Stephen B.; Musser, James M.; Parkhill, Julian; Bentley, Stephen D.; Aurell, Erik; Corander, Jukka (2017)
    Recent advances in the scale and diversity of population genomic datasets for bacteria now provide the potential for genome-wide patterns of co-evolution to be studied at the resolution of individual bases. Here we describe a new statistical method, genomeDCA, which uses recent advances in computational structural biology to identify the polymorphic loci under the strongest co-evolutionary pressures. We apply genomeDCA to two large population data sets representing the major human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) and Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus). For pneumococcus we identified 5,199 putative epistatic interactions between 1,936 sites. Over three-quarters of the links were between sites within the pbp2x, pbp1a and pbp2b genes, the sequences of which are critical in determining non-susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics. A network-based analysis found these genes were also coupled to that encoding dihydrofolate reductase, changes to which underlie trimethoprim resistance. Distinct from these antibiotic resistance genes, a large network component of 384 protein coding sequences encompassed many genes critical in basic cellular functions, while another distinct component included genes associated with virulence. The group A Streptococcus (GAS) data set population represents a clonal population with relatively little genetic variation and a high level of linkage disequilibrium across the genome. Despite this, we were able to pinpoint two RNA pseudouridine synthases, which were each strongly linked to a separate set of loci across the chromosome, representing biologically plausible targets of co-selection. The population genomic analysis method applied here identifies statistically significantly co-evolving locus pairs, potentially arising from fitness selection interdependence reflecting underlying protein- protein interactions, or genes whose product activities contribute to the same phenotype. This discovery approach greatly enhances the future potential of epistasis analysis for systems biology, and can complement genome-wide association studies as a means of formulating hypotheses for targeted experimental work.
  • Xu, Yingying; Puranen, Santeri; Corander, Jukka; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki (2018)
    We propose an efficient procedure for significance determination in high-dimensional dependence learning based on surrogate data testing, termed inverse finite-size scaling (IFSS). The IFSS method is based on our discovery of a universal scaling property of random matrices which enables inference about signal behavior from much smaller scale surrogate data than the dimensionality of the original data. As a motivating example, we demonstrate the procedure for ultra-high-dimensional Potts models with order of 1010 parameters. IFSS reduces the computational effort of the data-testing procedure by several orders of magnitude, making it very efficient for practical purposes. This approach thus holds considerable potential for generalization to other types of complex models.
  • Puranen, Santeri; Pesonen, Maiju; Pensar, Johan; Xu, Ying Ying; Lees, John A.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Corander, Jukka (2018)
    The potential for genome-wide modelling of epistasis has recently surfaced given the possibility of sequencing densely sampled populations and the emerging families of statistical interaction models. Direct coupling analysis (DCA) has previously been shown to yield valuable predictions for single protein structures, and has recently been extended to genome-wide analysis of bacteria, identifying novel interactions in the co-evolution between resistance, virulence and core genome elements. However, earlier computational DCA methods have not been scalable to enable model fitting simultaneously to 10(4)-10(5) polymorphisms, representing the amount of core genomic variation observed in analyses of many bacterial species. Here, we introduce a novel inference method (SuperDCA) that employs a new scoring principle, efficient parallelization, optimization and filtering on phylogenetic information to achieve scalability for up to 10(5) polymorphisms. Using two large population samples of Streptococcus pneumoniae, we demonstrate the ability of SuperDCA to make additional significant biological findings about this major human pathogen. We also show that our method can uncover signals of selection that are not detectable by genome-wide association analysis, even though our analysis does not require phenotypic measurements. SuperDCA, thus, holds considerable potential in building understanding about numerous organisms at a systems biological level.