Browsing by Subject "DISSOLUTION BEHAVIOR"

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  • Rautaniemi, Kaisa; Vuorimaa-Laukkanen, Elina; Strachan, Clare J.; Laaksonen, Timo (2018)
    Pharmaceutical scientists are increasingly interested in amorphous drug formulations especially because of their higher dissolution rates. Consequently, the thorough characterization and analysis of these formulations are becoming more and more important for the pharmaceutical industry. Here, fluorescence lifetime-imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to monitor the crystallization of an amorphous pharmaceutical compound, indomethacin. Initially, we identified different solid indomethacin forms, amorphous and gamma- and alpha-crystalline, on the basis of their time-resolved fluorescence. All of the studied indomethacin forms showed biexponential decays with characteristic fluorescence lifetimes and amplitudes. Using this information, the crystallization of amorphous indomethacin upon storage in 60 degrees C was monitored for 10 days with FLIM. The progress of crystallization was detected as lifetime changes both in the FLIM images and in the fluorescence-decay curves extracted from the images. The fluorescence-lifetime amplitudes were used for quantitative analysis of the crystallization process. We also demonstrated that the fluorescence-lifetime distribution of the sample changed during crystallization, and when the sample was not moved between measuring times, the lifetime distribution could also be used for the analysis of the reaction kinetics. Our results clearly show that FLIM is a sensitive and nondestructive method for monitoring solid-state transformations on the surfaces of fluorescent samples.
  • Peltonen, Leena; Strachan, Clare J. (2020)
    Poor aqueous solubility is currently a prevalent issue in the development of small molecule pharmaceuticals. Several methods are possible for improving the solubility, dissolution rate and bioavailability of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class II and class IV drugs. Two solid state approaches, which rely on reductions in order, and can theoretically be applied to all molecules without any specific chemical prerequisites (compared with e.g. ionizable or co-former groups, or sufficient lipophilicity), are the use of the amorphous form and nanocrystals. Research involving these two approaches is relatively extensive and commercial products are now available based on these technologies. Nevertheless, their formulation remains more challenging than with conventional dosage forms. This article describes these two technologies from both theoretical and practical perspectives by briefly discussing the physicochemical backgrounds behind these approaches, as well as the resulting practical implications, both positive and negative. Case studies demonstrating the benefits and challenges of these two techniques are presented.
  • Ojarinta, Rami; Saarinen, Jukka; Strachan, Clare J.; Korhonen, Ossi; Laitinen, Riikka (2018)
    Co-amorphous mixtures have rarely been formulated as oral dosage forms, even though they have been shown to stabilize amorphous drugs in the solid state and enhance the dissolution properties of poorly soluble drugs. In the present study we formulated tablets consisting of either spray dried co-amorphous ibuprofen-arginine or indomethacin-arginine, mannitol or xylitol and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (PVP). Experimental design was used for the selection of tablet compositions, and the effect of tablet composition on tablet characteristics was modelled. Multimodal non-linear imaging, including coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and sum frequency/second harmonic generation (SFG/SHG) microscopies, as well as scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the tablets. The tablets possessed sufficient strength, but modelling produced no clear evidence about the compaction characteristics of co-amorphous salts. However, co-amorphous drug-arginine mixtures resulted in enhanced dissolution behaviour, and the PVP in the tableting mixture stabilized the supersaturation. The co-amorphous mixtures were physically stable during compaction, but the excipient selection affected the long term stability of the ibuprofen-arginine mixture. CARS and SFG/SHG proved feasible techniques in imaging the component distribution on the tablet surfaces, but possibly due to the limited imaging area, recrystallization detected with xray diffraction was not detected.