Browsing by Subject "DNA DELETIONS"

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  • Forsström, Saara; Jackson, Christopher B.; Carroll, Christopher J.; Kuronen, Mervi; Pirinen, Eija; Pradhan, Swagat; Marmyleva, Anastasiia; Auranen, Mari; Kleine, Iida-Marja; Khan, Nahid A.; Roivainen, Anne; Marjamäki, Paivi; Liljenbäck, Heidi; Wang, Liya; Battersby, Brendan J.; Richter, Uwe; Velagapudi, Vidya; Nikkanen, Joni; Euro, Liliya; Suomalainen, Anu (2019)
    Mitochondrial dysfunction elicits stress responses that safeguard cellular homeostasis against metabolic insults. Mitochondrial integrated stress response (ISRmt) is a major response to mitochondrial (mt)DNA expression stress (mtDNA maintenance, translation defects), but the knowledge of dynamics or interdependence of components is lacking. We report that in mitochondrial myopathy, ISRmt progresses in temporal stages and development from early to chronic and is regulated by autocrine and endocrine effects of FGF21, a metabolic hormone with pleiotropic effects. Initial disease signs induce transcriptional ISRmt (ATF5, mitochondria) one-carbon cycle, FGF21, and GDF15). The local progression to 2nd metabolic ISRmt stage (ATF3, ATF4, glucose uptake, serine biosynthesis, and transsulfuration) is FGF21 dependent. Mitochondria! unfolded protein response marks the 3rd ISRmt stage of failing tissue. Systemically, FGF21 drives weight loss and glucose preference, and modifies metabolism and respiratory chain deficiency in a specific hippocampal brain region. Our evidence indicates that FGF21 is a local and systemic messenger of mtDNA stress in mice and humans with mitochondrial disease.
  • Buzkova, Jana; Nikkanen, Joni; Ahola, Sofia; Hakonen, Anna H.; Sevastianova, Ksenia; Hovinen, Topi; Yki-Järvinen, Hannele; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Velagapudi, Vidya; Carroll, Christopher J.; Suomalainen, Anu (2018)
    Mitochondrial disorders (MDs) are inherited multi-organ diseases with variable phenotypes. Inclusion body myositis (IBM), a sporadic inflammatory muscle disease, also shows mitochondrial dysfunction. We investigated whether primary and secondary MDs modify metabolism to reveal pathogenic pathways and biomarkers. We investigated metabolomes of 25 mitochondrial myopathy or ataxias patients, 16 unaffected carriers, six IBM and 15 non-mitochondrial neuromuscular disease (NMD) patients and 30 matched controls. MD and IBM metabolomes clustered separately from controls and NMDs. MDs and IBM showed transsulfuration pathway changes; creatine and niacinamide depletion marked NMDs, IBM and infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia (IOSCA). Low blood and muscle arginine was specific for patients with m.3243A>G mutation. A four-metabolite blood multi-biomarker (sorbitol, alanine, myoinositol, cystathionine) distinguished primary MDs from others (76% sensitivity, 95% specificity). Our omics approach identified pathways currently used to treat NMDs and mitochondrial stroke-like episodes and proposes nicotinamide riboside in MDs and IBM, and creatine in IOSCA and IBM as novel treatment targets. The disease-specific metabolic fingerprints are valuable "multi-biomarkers" for diagnosis and promising tools for follow-up of disease progression and treatment effect.
  • Richter, Uwe; Ng, Kah Ying; Suomi, Fumi; Marttinen, Paula; Turunen, Taina; Jackson, Christopher; Suomalainen, Anu; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Nyman, Tuula A.; Isokallio, Marita A.; Stewart, James B.; Mancini, Cecilia; Brusco, Alfredo; Seneca, Sara; Lombes, Anne; Taylor, Robert W.; Battersby, Brendan J. (2019)
    Mitochondria have a compartmentalized gene expression system dedicated to the synthesis of membrane proteins essential for oxidative phosphorylation. Responsive quality control mechanisms are needed to ensure that aberrant protein synthesis does not disrupt mitochondrial function. Pathogenic mutations that impede the function of the mitochondrial matrix quality control protease complex composed of AFG3L2 and paraplegin cause a multifaceted clinical syndrome. At the cell and molecular level, defects to this quality control complex are defined by impairment to mitochondrial form and function. Here, we establish the etiology of these phenotypes. We show how disruptions to the quality control of mitochondrial protein synthesis trigger a sequential stress response characterized first by OMA1 activation followed by loss of mitochondrial ribosomes and by remodelling of mitochondrial inner membrane ultrastructure. Inhibiting mitochondrial protein synthesis with chloramphenicol completely blocks this stress response. Together, our data establish a mechanism linking major cell biological phenotypes of AFG3L2 pathogenesis and show how modulation of mitochondrial protein synthesis can exert a beneficial effect on organelle homeostasis.
  • Ahola, Sofia; Auranen, Mari; Isohanni, Pirjo; Niemisalo, Satu; Urho, Niina; Buzkova, Jana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Lundbom, Nina; Hakkarainen, Antti; Muurinen , Tiina; Piirilä, Päivi; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Suomalainen, Anu (2016)
    Mitochondrial myopathy (MM) with progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease in adulthood, for which there is no curative therapy. In mice with MM, ketogenic diet significantly delayed progression of the disease. We asked in this pilot study what effects high-fat, low-carbohydrate modified Atkins diet (mAD) had for PEO/MM patients and control subjects and followed up the effects by clinical, morphological, transcriptomic, and metabolomic analyses. All of our five patients, irrespective of genotype, showed a subacute response after 1.5-2weeks of diet, with progressive muscle pain and leakage of muscle enzymes, leading to premature discontinuation of the diet. Analysis of muscle ultrastructure revealed selective fiber damage, especially in the ragged-red-fibers (RRFs), a MM hallmark. Two years of follow-up showed improvement of muscle strength, suggesting activation of muscle regeneration. Our results indicate that (i) nutrition can modify mitochondrial disease progression, (ii) dietary counseling should be part of MM care, (iii) short mAD is a tool to induce targeted RRF lysis, and (iv) mAD, a common weight-loss method, may induce muscle damage in a population subgroup.