Browsing by Subject "DNA-POLYMERASE-GAMMA"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-4 of 4
  • Hikmat, Omar; Naess, Karin; Engvall, Martin; Klingenberg, Claus; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Fiskerstrand, Torunn; Isohanni, Pirjo; Uusimaa, Johanna; Darin, Niklas; Rahman, Shamima; Bindoff, Laurence A. (2018)
    Objective: Epilepsy is common in individuals with mutations in POLG, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Early recognition and aggressive seizure management are crucial for patient survival. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is implicated in various neurological disorders including epilepsy. The aim of this study was to assess whether POLG-related disease is associated with BBB dysfunction and what clinical implications this has for patients. Methods: Our retrospective study used data from 83 patients with pathogenic POLG mutations from 4 countries-Norway, Sweden, Finland, and the United Kingdom. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire. We used the presence of raised cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein and a raised CSF/serum ratio of albumin (Q-alb) to evaluate the integrity of the blood-CSF bather. Results: Raised CSF protein was found in 70% of patients (n = 58/83) and appeared to be associated with the most severe phenotypes. In those in whom it was measured, the Q-alb ratio was markedly elevated (n = 18). The majority of those with epilepsy (n = 50/66, 76%) had raised CSF protein, and this preceded seizure debut in 75% (n = 15/20). The median survival time from symptom onset for those with raised CSF protein was decreased (13 months) compared to those with normal CSF protein (32 months). Significance: Our results indicate that there is disruption of the BBB in POLG-related disease, as evidenced by a raised CSF protein and Q-alb ratio. We also find that raised CSF protein is a common finding in patients with POLG disease. Our data suggest that the presence of BBB dysfunction predicts a poorer outcome, and elevated CSF protein may therefore be an additional biomarker both for early diagnosis and to identify those at high risk of developing epilepsy.
  • Shi, Yonghong; Posse, Viktor; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hyvärinen, Anne K.; Jacobs, Howard T.; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M. (2016)
    During replication of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), clashes with the transcription apparatus can cause replication fork collapse and genomic instability. To avoid this problem, a replication fork barrier protein is situated downstream of rDNA, there preventing replication in the direction opposite rDNA transcription. A potential candidate for a similar function in mitochondria is the mitochondrial transcription termination factor 1 (MTERF1, also denoted mTERF), which binds to a sequence just downstream of the ribosomal transcription unit. Previous studies have shown that MTERF1 prevents antisense transcription over the ribosomal RNA genes, a process which we here show to be independent of the transcription elongation factor TEFM. Importantly, we now demonstrate that MTERF1 arrests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication with distinct polarity. The effect is explained by the ability of MTERF1 to act as a directional contrahelicase, blocking mtDNA unwinding by the mitochondrial helicase TWINKLE. This conclusion is also supported by in vivo evidence that MTERF1 stimulates TWINKLE pausing. We conclude that MTERF1 can direct polar replication fork arrest in mammalian mitochondria.
  • Hikmat, Omar; Naess, Karin; Engvall, Martin; Klingenberg, Claus; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Samsonsen, Christian; Brodtkorb, Eylert; Ostergaard, Elsebet; de Coo, Rene; Pias-Peleteiro, Leticia; Isohanni, Pirjo; Uusimaa, Johanna; Darin, Niklas; Rahman, Shamima; Bindoff, Laurence A. (2020)
    Objective To study the impact of gender, puberty, and pregnancy on the expression of POLG disease, one of the most common mitochondrial diseases known. Methods Clinical, laboratory, and genetic data were collected retrospectively from 155 patients with genetically confirmed POLG disease recruited from seven European countries. We used the available data to study the impact of gender, puberty, and pregnancy on disease onset and deterioration. Results We found that disease onset early in life was common in both sexes but there was also a second peak in females around the time of puberty. Further, pregnancy had a negative impact with 10 of 14 women (71%) experiencing disease onset or deterioration during pregnancy. Interpretation Gender clearly influences the expression of POLG disease. While onset very early in life was common in both males and females, puberty in females appeared associated both with disease onset and increased disease activity. Further, both disease onset and deterioration, including seizure aggravation and status epilepticus, appeared to be associated with pregnancy. Thus, whereas disease activity appears maximal early in life with no subsequent peaks in males, both menarche and pregnancy appear associated with disease onset or worsening in females. This suggests that hormonal changes may be a modulating factor.