Browsing by Subject "DNA-SEQUENCING DATA"

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  • Chew, Tracy; Haase, Bianca; Bathgate, Roslyn; Willet, Cali E.; Kaukonen, Maria K.; Mascord, Lisa J.; Lohi, Hannes T.; Wade, Claire M. (2017)
    Progressive retinal atrophy is a common cause of blindness in the dog and affects >100 breeds. It is characterized by gradual vision loss that occurs due to the degeneration of photoreceptor cells in the retina. Similar to the human counterpart retinitis pigmentosa, the canine disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and the underlying cause remains unknown for many cases. We use a positional candidate gene approach to identify putative variants in the Hungarian Puli breed using genotyping data of 14 family-based samples (CanineHD BeadChip array, Illumina) and whole-genome sequencing data of two proband and two parental samples (Illumina HiSeq 2000). A single nonsense SNP in exon 2 of BBS4 (c.58A > T, p.Lys20*) was identified following filtering of high quality variants. This allele is highly associated (P-CHISQ = 3.425e(-14), n = 103) and segregates perfectly with progressive retinal atrophy in the Hungarian Puli. In humans, BBS4 is known to cause Bardet-Biedl syndrome which includes a retinitis pigmentosa phenotype. From the observed coding change we expect that no functional BBS4 can be produced in the affected dogs. We identified canine phenotypes comparable with Bbs4-null mice including obesity and spermatozoa flagella defects. Knockout mice fail to form spermatozoa flagella. In the affected Hungarian Puli spermatozoa flagella are present, however a large proportion of sperm are morphologically abnormal and
  • Dufva, Olli; Kankainen, Matti; Kelkka, Tiina; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Awad, Shady Adnan; Eldfors, Samuli; Yadav, Bhagwan; Kuusanmäki, Heikki; Malani, Disha; Andersson, Emma I.; Pietarinen, Paavo; Saikko, Leena; Kovanen, Panu E.; Ojala, Teija; Lee, Dean A.; Loughran, Thomas P.; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Suzumiya, Junji; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Ko, Young Hyeh; Kim, Won Seog; Chuang, Shih-Sung; Aittokallio, Tero; Chan, Wing C.; Ohshima, Koichi; Ishida, Fumihiro; Mustjoki, Satu (2018)
    Aggressive natural killer-cell (NK-cell) leukemia (ANKL) is an extremely aggressive malignancy with dismal prognosis and lack of targeted therapies. Here, we elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of ANKL using a combination of genomic and drug sensitivity profiling. We study 14 ANKL patients using whole-exome sequencing (WES) and identify mutations in STAT3 (21%) and RAS-MAPK pathway genes (21%) as well as in DDX3X (29%) and epigenetic modifiers (50%). Additional alterations include JAK-STAT copy gains and tyrosine phosphatase mutations, which we show recurrent also in extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (NKTCL) through integration of public genomic data. Drug sensitivity profiling further demonstrates the role of the JAK-STAT pathway in the pathogenesis of NK-cell malignancies, identifying NK cells to be highly sensitive to JAK and BCL2 inhibition compared to other hematopoietic cell lineages. Our results provide insight into ANKL genetics and a framework for application of targeted therapies in NK-cell malignancies.
  • Muona, Mikko; Ishimura, Ryosuke; Laari, Anni; Ichimura, Yoshinobu; Linnankivi, Tarja; Keski-Filppula, Riikka; Herva, Riitta; Rantala, Heikki; Paetau, Anders; Pöyhönen, Minna; Obata, Miki; Uemura, Takefumi; Karhu, Thomas; Bizen, Norihisa; Takebayashi, Hirohide; McKee, Shane; Parker, Michael J.; Akawi, Nadia; McRae, Jeremy; Hurles, Matthew E.; Kuismin, Outi; Kurki, Mitja I.; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa; Tanaka, Keiji; Palotie, Aarno; Waguri, Satoshi; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Komatsus, Masaaki; DDD Study (2016)
    The ubiquitin fold modifier 1 (UFM1) cascade is a recently identified evolutionarily conserved ubiquitin-like modification system whose function and link to human disease have remained largely uncharacterized. By using exome sequencing in Finnish individuals with severe epileptic syndromes, we identified pathogenic compound heterozygous variants in UBAS, encoding an activating enzyme for UFM1, in two unrelated families. Two additional individuals with biallelic UBAS variants were identified from the UK-based Deciphering Developmental Disorders study and one from the Northern Finland Intellectual Disability cohort. The affected individuals (n = 9) presented in early infancy with severe irritability, followed by dystonia and stagnation of development. Furthermore, the majority of individuals display postnatal microcephaly and epilepsy and develop spasticity. The affected individuals were compound heterozygous for a missense substitution, c.1111G>A (p.A1a371Thr; allele frequency of 0.28% in Europeans), and a nonsense variant or c.164G>A that encodes an amino acid substitution p.Arg5SHis, but also affects splicing by facilitating exon 2 skipping, thus also being in effect a loss-of-function allele. Using an in vitro thioester formation assay and cellular analyses, we show that the p.A1a371Thr variant is hypomorphic with attenuated ability to transfer the activated UFM1 to UFC1. Finally, we show that the CNS-specific knockout of Ufml in mice causes neonatal death accompanied by microcephaly and apoptosis in specific neurons, further suggesting that the UFM1 system is essential for CNS development and function. Taken together, our data imply that the combination of a hypomorphic p.A1a371Thr variant in trans with a loss-of-function allele in UBAS underlies a severe infantile-onset encephalopathy.
  • Williamson, Charles H. D.; Sahl, Jason W.; Smith, Theresa J.; Xie, Gary; Foley, Brian T.; Smith, Leonard A.; Fernandez, Rafael A.; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu; Keim, Paul; Foster, Jeffrey; Hill, Karen (2016)
    Background: Clostridium botulinum is a diverse group of bacteria characterized by the production of botulinum neurotoxin. Botulinum neurotoxins are classified into serotypes (BoNT/A-G), which are produced by six species/Groups of Clostridia, but the genetic background of the bacteria remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to use comparative genomics to provide insights into the genetic diversity and evolutionary history of bacteria that produce the potent botulinum neurotoxin. Results: Comparative genomic analyses of over 170 Clostridia genomes, including our draft genome assemblies for 59 newly sequenced Clostridia strains from six continents and publicly available genomic data, provided in-depth insights into the diversity and distribution of BoNT-producing bacteria. These newly sequenced strains included Group I and II strains that express BoNT/A,/B,/E, or/F as well as bivalent strains. BoNT-producing Clostridia and closely related Clostridia species were delineated with a variety of methods including 16S rRNA gene, concatenated marker genes, core genome and concatenated multi-locus sequencing typing (MLST) gene phylogenies that related whole genome sequenced strains to publicly available strains and sequence types. These analyses illustrated the phylogenetic diversity in each Group and the diversity of genomic backgrounds that express the same toxin type or subtype. Comparisons of the botulinum neurotoxin genes did not identify novel toxin types or variants. Conclusions: This study represents one of the most comprehensive analyses of whole genome sequence data for Group I and II BoNT-producing strains. Read data and draft genome assemblies generated for 59 isolates will be a resource to the research community. Core genome phylogenies proved to be a powerful tool for differentiating BoNT-producing strains and can provide a framework for the study of these bacteria. Comparative genomic analyses of Clostridia species illustrate the diversity of botulinum-neurotoxin-producing strains and the plasticity of the genomic backgrounds in which bont genes are found.
  • Akinrinade, Oyediran; Ollila, Laura; Vattulainen, Sanna; Tallila, Jonna; Gentile, Massimiliano; Salmenpera, Pertteli; Koillinen, Hannele; Kaartinen, Maija; Nieminen, Markku S.; Myllykangas, Samuel; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Koskenvuo, Juha W.; Helio, Tiina (2015)
    Aims Genetic analysis among patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is becoming an important part of clinical assessment, as it is in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The genetics of DCM is complex and therefore next-generation sequencing strategies are essential when providing genetic diagnostics. To achieve maximum yield, the diagnostic approach should include comprehensive clinical phenotyping combined with high-quality, high-coverage deep sequencing of DCM-associated genes and clinical variant classification as a basis for defining true yield in genetic testing. Our study has combined a novel sequencing strategy and clinical interpretation to analyse the yield and genotype-phenotype correlations among well-phenotyped Finnish DCM patients.Despite our increased understanding of the genetic basis of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), the clinical utility and yield of clinically meaningful findings of comprehensive next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based genetic diagnostics in DCM has been poorly described. We utilized a high-quality oligonucleotide-selective sequencing (OS-Seq)-based targeted sequencing panel to investigate the genetic landscape of DCM in Finnish population and to evaluate the utility of OS-Seq technology as a novel comprehensive diagnostic tool. Methods and results Using OS-Seq, we targeted and sequenced the coding regions and splice junctions of 101 genes associated with cardiomyopathies in 145 unrelated Finnish patients with DCM. We developed effective bioinformatic variant filtering strategy and implemented strict variant classification scheme to reveal diagnostic yield and genotype-phenotype correlations. Implemented OS-Seq technology provided high coverage of the target region (median coverage 410x and 99.42% of the nucleotides were sequenced at least 15x read depth). Diagnostic yield was 35.2% (familial 47.6% and sporadic 25.6%, P = 0.004) when both pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants are considered as disease causing. Of these, 20 (53%) were titin (TTN) truncations (non-sense and frameshift) affecting all TTN transcripts. TTN truncations accounted for 20.6% and 14.6% of the familial and sporadic DCM cases, respectively. Conclusion Panel-based, high-quality NGS enables high diagnostic yield especially in the familial form of DCM, and bioinformatic variant filtering is a reliable step in the process of interpretation of genomic data in a clinical setting.
  • Koskela, Satu; Ritari, Jarmo; Hyvärinen, Kati; Kwan, Tony; Niittyvuopio, Riitta; Itälä-Remes, Maija; Pastinen, Tomi; Partanen, Jukka (2018)
    Matching classical HLA alleles between donor and recipient is an important factor in avoiding adverse immunological effects in HSCT. Siblings with no differences in HLA alleles, either due to identical-by-state or identical-by-descent status, are considered to be optimal donors. We carried out a retrospective genomic sequence and SNP analysis of 336 fully HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 matched and 14 partially HLA-matched sibling HSCT pairs to determine the level of undetected mismatching within the MHC segment as well as to map their recombination sites. The genomic sequence of 34 genes locating in the MHC region revealed allelic mismatching at 1 to 8 additional genes in partially HLA-matched pairs. Also, fully matched pairs were found to have mismatching either at HLA-DPB1 or at non-HLA region within the MHC segment. Altogether, 3.9% of fully HLA-matched HSCT pairs had large genomic mismatching in the MHC segment. Recombination sites mapped to certain restricted locations. The number of mismatched nucleotides correlated with the risk of GvHD supporting the central role of full HLA matching in HSCT. High-density genome analysis revealed that fully HLA-matched siblings may not have identical MHC segments and even single allelic mismatching at any classical HLA gene often implies larger genomic differences along MHC.
  • Koskinen, Lotta L. E.; Seppälä, Eija H.; Belanger, Janelle M.; Arumilli, Meharji; Hakosalo, Osmo; Jokinen, Paivi; Nevalainen, Elisa M.; Viitmaa, Ranno; Jokinen, Tarja S.; Oberbauer, Anita M.; Lohi, Hannes (2015)
    Background: Idiopathic epilepsy is a common neurological disease in human and domestic dogs but relatively few risk genes have been identified to date. The seizure characteristics, including focal and generalised seizures, are similar between the two species, with gene discovery facilitated by the reduced genetic heterogeneity of purebred dogs. We have recently identified a risk locus for idiopathic epilepsy in the Belgian Shepherd breed on a 4.4 megabase region on CFA37. Results: We have expanded a previous study replicating the association with a combined analysis of 157 cases and 179 controls in three additional breeds: Schipperke, Finnish Spitz and Beagle (p(c) = 2.9e-07, p(GWAS) = 1.74E-02). A targeted resequencing of the 4.4 megabase region in twelve Belgian Shepherd cases and twelve controls with opposite haplotypes identified 37 case-specific variants within the ADAM23 gene. Twenty-seven variants were validated in 285 cases and 355 controls from four breeds, resulting in a strong replication of the ADAM23 locus (p(raw) = 2.76e-15) and the identification of a common 28 kb-risk haplotype in all four breeds. Risk haplotype was present in frequencies of 0.49-0.7 in the breeds, suggesting that ADAM23 is a low penetrance risk gene for canine epilepsy. Conclusions: These results implicate ADAM23 in common canine idiopathic epilepsy, although the causative variant remains yet to be identified. ADAM23 plays a role in synaptic transmission and interacts with known epilepsy genes, LGI1 and LGI2, and should be considered as a candidate gene for human epilepsies.
  • Ottosson-Laakso, Emilia; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Forsen, Bjorn; Gullstrom, Monika; Groop, Per-Henrik; Groop, Leif; Vikman, Petter (2016)
    Familial renal glycosuria is an inherited disorder resulting in glucose excretion in the urine despite normal blood glucose concentrations. It is most commonly due to mutations in the SLC5A2 gene coding for the glucose transporter SGLT2 in the proximal tubule. Several drugs have been introduced as means to lower glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes targeting SGLT2 resulting in renal glycosuria, but no studies have addressed the potential effects of decreased renal glucose reabsorption and chronic glycosuria on the prevention of glucose intolerance. Here we present data on a large pedigree with renal glycosuria due to two mutations (c.300-303+2del and p.A343V) in the SLC5A2 gene. The mutations, which in vitro affected glucose transport in a cell line model, and the ensuing glycosuria were not associated with better glycemic control during a follow-up period of more than 10 years. One individual, who was compound heterozygous for mutations in the SLC5A2 gene suffered from severe urogenital candida infections and postprandial hypoglycemia. In conclusion, in this family with familial glycosuria we did not find any evidence that chronic loss of glucose in the urine would protect from deterioration of the glucose tolerance over time.
  • Xu, Hongen; Pausch, Hubert; Venhoranta, Heli; Rutkowska, Karolina; Wurmser, Christine; Rieblinger, Beate; Flisikowska, Tatiana; Frishman, Dmitrij; Zwierzchowski, Lech; Fries, Ruedi; Andersson, Magnus; Kind, Alexander; Schnieke, Angelika; Flisikowski, Krzysztof (2017)
    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is caused by dysregulation of placental metabolism. Paternally inherited IUGR mutations in the fetus influence maternal physiology via the placenta. However, it is not known whether the maternal placenta also affects the extent of IUGR in such fetuses. In cattle and other ruminants, maternal-fetal communication occurs primarily at the placentomes. We previously identified a 3 deletion in the noncoding MER1 repeat containing imprinted transcript 1 (MIMT1) gene that, when inherited from the sire, causes IUGR and late abortion in Ayshire cattle with variable levels of severity. Here, we compared the transcriptome and genomic imprinting in fetal and maternal placentome components of wild-type and MIMT1(Del/WT) fetuses before IUGR became apparent, to identify key early events. Transcriptome analysis revealed fewer differentially expressed genes in maternal than fetal MIMT1(Del/WT) placentome. AST1, within the PEG3 domain, was the only gene consistently reduced in IUGR in both fetal and maternal samples. Several genes showed an imprinting pattern associated with IUGR, of which only secernin 3 (SCRN3) and paternally expressed 3 (PEG3) were differentially imprinted in both placentome components. Loss of strictly monoallelic, allele-specific expression (similar to 80:20) of PEG3 in the maternal MIMT1(Del/WT) placenta could be associated with incomplete penetrance of MIMT1(Del). Our data show that dysregulation of the PEG3 domain is involved in IUGR, but also reveal that maternal placental tissues may affect the penetrance of the paternally inherited IUGR mutation.
  • Jiao, Xiang; Aravidis, Christos; Marikkannu, Rajeshwari; Rantala, Johanna; Picelli, Simone; Adamovic, Tatjana; Liu, Tao; Maguire, Paula; Kremeyer, Barbara; Luo, Liping; Von Holst, Susanna; Kontham, Vinaykumar; Thutkawkorapin, Jessada; Margolin, Sara; Du, Quan; Lundin, Johanna; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Boeckx, Bram; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Bruning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L.; Devilee, Peter; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dork, Thilo; Eriksson, Mikael; Fasching, Peter A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; NBCS Collaborators; kConFab AOCS Investigators (2017)
    Most non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families have no identified genetic cause. We used linkage and haplotype analyses in familial and sporadic breast cancer cases to identify a susceptibility locus on chromosome 6q. Two independent genome-wide linkage analysis studies suggested a 3 Mb locus on chromosome 6q and two unrelated Swedish families with a LOD > 2 together seemed to share a haplotype in 6q14.1. We hypothesized that this region harbored a rare high-risk founder allele contributing to breast cancer in these two families. Sequencing of DNA and RNA from the two families did not detect any pathogenic mutations. Finally, 29 SNPs in the region were analyzed in 44,214 cases and 43,532 controls from BCAC, and the original haplotypes in the two families were suggested as low-risk alleles for European and Swedish women specifically. There was also some support for one additional independent moderate-risk allele in Swedish familial samples. The results were consistent with our previous findings in familial breast cancer and supported a breast cancer susceptibility locus at 6q14.1 around the PHIP gene.