Browsing by Subject "DOC"

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  • Miettinen, H.; Pumpanen, J.; Rantakari, M.; Ojala, A. (2020)
    We studied in 2013 and 2014 the spring carbon dynamics in a Boreal landscape consisting of a lake and 15 inflowing streams and an outlet. The first year had weather and a hydrological regime typical of past years with a distinct spring freshet connected with the thaw of the average snowpack. The latter year had higher air temperatures which did not permit snow accumulation, despite similar winter precipitation. As such, there was hardly any spring freshet in 2014, and stream discharge peaked in January, i.e., the conditions resembled those predicted in the future climate. Despite the hydrological differences between the years, there were only small interannual differences in the stream CO2 and DOC concentrations. The relationship between the concentrations and discharge was stronger in the typical year. CO2 concentrations in medium-sized streams correlated negatively with the discharge, indicating dilution effect of melting snowpacks, while in large-sized streams the correlation was positive, suggesting stronger groundwater influence. The DOC pathway to these streams was through the subsurface soil layers, not the groundwater. The total amount of carbon transported into the lake was ca. 1.5-fold higher in the typical year than in the year with warm winter. In 2013, most of the lateral inputs took place during spring freshet. In 2014, the majority of inputs occurred earlier, during the winter months. The lateral CO2 signal was visible in the lake at 1.5 m depth. DOC dominated the carbon transport, and in both years, 12% of the input C was in inorganic form.
  • Kankaala, Paula; Arvola, Lauri; Hiltunen, Minna; Huotari, Jussi; Jones, Roger I.; Hannu, Nykänen; Ojala, Anne; Olin, Mikko; Peltomaa, Elina; Peura, Sari; Rask, Martti; Tulonen, Tiina; Vesala, Sami (2019)
    Recent increases in terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in northern inland waters have many ecological consequences. We examined available data on carbon cycles and food webs of 2 boreal headwater lakes in southern Finland. Basic limnology and catchment characteristics of a pristine lake, Valkea-Kotinen (VK), were monitored over the past 25 years while the lake has undergone browning and DOC increased from similar to 11 to 13 mg L-1. Pronounced changes in the early 2000s represent a regime shift in DOC concentration and color. Lake Alinen Mustajarvi (AM) was manipulated for 2 years by additions of labile DOC (cane sugar), raising the DOC concentration from similar to 10 to 12 mg L-1, but not changing light conditions. The 2 different approaches both revealed increased concentrations and efflux of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the lakes and thus net heterotrophy and changes in the pelagic community structure following an increase in DOC concentration. Long-term monitoring of VK revealed a decline in phytoplankton primary production (PP) along with browning, which was reflected in retarded growth of young (1-2-year-old) perch. In the experimentally manipulated lake (AM), PP was not affected, and the growth of young perch was more variable. The results suggested the importance of a pathway from labile DOC via benthic invertebrates to perch. Although provided with this extra resource, the food chain based on DOC proved inefficient. Long-term monitoring and whole-lake experimentation are complementary approaches for revealing how freshwater ecosystems respond to climate and/or atmospheric deposition-induced changes, such as browning.
  • Manninen, Noora Johanna; Soinne, Helena Susanna; Lemola, Riitta; Hoikkala, Laura Kristiina; Turtola, Eila (2018)
    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) load in discharges from cultivated soils may have negative impacts on surface waters. The magnitude of the load may vary according to soil properties or agricultural management practices. This study quantifies the DOC load of cultivated mineral soils and investigates whether the load is affected by agricultural practices. Discharge volumes and concentrations of DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) were continually measured at three sites from surface runoff and artificial subsurface drainage or from combined total discharge over a two-year period (2012-2014). Two experimental sites in South-West Finland had clayey soils (with soil carbon contents of 2.7-5.9% in the topmost soil layer), and the third site in West-Central Finland had sandy soil (soil carbon contents of 4.3-6.2%). Permanent grassland, organic manure application, mineral fertilization, and conventional ploughing or no-till activities were studied. Furthermore, the biodegradable DOC pool of surface runoff and subsurface drainage water from no-till and ploughed fields was estimated in a 2-month incubation experiment with natural bacterial communities collected from the Baltic Sea seawater. The annual DOC and DON loads were affected by discharge volume and seasonal weather conditions. The loads varied between 25-52 kg ha(-1) and 0.8-3.2 kg ha(-1), respectively, and were comparable to those from boreal forests with similar soil types. The DOC load increased with increasing topsoil carbon content at all sites. There were slightly higher DOC concentrations and DOC load from permanent grassland, but otherwise we could not distinguish any clear management-induced differences in the total DOC loads. While only 6-17% of the DOC in discharge water was biologically degraded during the 2-month incubation, the proportion of biodegradable (labile) DOC in surface runoff appeared to increase when soil was ploughed compared to no-till. (c) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Wang, Shijun (Helsingin yliopisto, 2018)
    The article shows the history of studies of DC, stresses the importance of lateral transport of DC, explores and reviews the factors (vegetation, soil, temperature and precipitation, discharge, pH, weathering, global change and human perturbations) affecting transport of DC from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems and reveals many research gaps, which currently hinder a systematic understanding of lateral transport of DC from aquatic to ecosystems. The inclusion of DIC and DOC in the context of lateral transport of carbon offers more information on studies of DC. This article offers insight into the factors affecting the lateral transport of DC for future studies that focus on constructing models of the global carbon cycle and the estimate of terrestrial/global carbon budget. In addition, the factors affecting the transport of DC from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems shed some light on the management of forests, peatlands, agricultural activities and land use changes.
  • Peltomaa, Elina; Könönen, Mari; Palviainen, Marjo; Laurén, Annamari (Ari); Zhu, Xudan; Kinnunen, Niko; Aaltonen, Heidi; Ojala, Anne; Pumpanen, Jukka (2022)
    Boreal peatlands are vast carbon (C) stores but also major sources of dissolved organic C (DOC) and nutrients to surface waters. Drainage and forest harvesting accelerates DOC leaching. Continuous cover forestry (CCF) is considered to cause fewer adverse environmental effects. Yet, the effects of CCF on DOC processes are unrecognised. We study DOC production and quality in unharvested, CCF, and clear-cut drained peatland forests and in a non-forested alluvial sedge fen. Parallel replicate peat columns with ground vegetation are collected from the uppermost 50 cm at each site, and the water table (WT) is set to -20 or -40 cm depths on the columns. During the eight-month ex situ incubation experiment, the soil water samples are extracted monthly or bi-monthly. The samples are incubated at 15 degrees C for multiple 72 h incubation cycles to study pore water quality and biodegradation of DOC. The CO2 production occurs during the first three days. The DOC concentrations and the CO2 release per volume of water are significantly lower in the sedge fen than in the drained peatland forests. The WT has a negligible effect on DOC concentrations and no effect on DOC quality, but the higher WT has generally higher CO2 production per DOC than the lower WT. The results suggest that peat in the drained peatlands is not vulnerable to changes per se but that forest management alters biotic and abiotic factors that control the production, transport, and biodegradation of DOC.
  • Keva, Ossi; Taipale, Sami J.; Hayden, Brian; Thomas, Stephen M.; Vesterinen, Jussi; Kankaala, Paula; Kahilainen, Kimmo K. (2021)
    Climate change in the Arctic is outpacing the global average and land-use is intensifying due to exploitation of previously inaccessible or unprofitable natural resources. A comprehensive understanding of how the joint effects of changing climate and productivity modify lake food web structure, biomass, trophic pyramid shape and abundance of physiologically essential biomolecules (omega-3 fatty acids) in the biotic community is lacking. We conducted a space-for-time study in 20 subarctic lakes spanning a climatic (+3.2 degrees C and precipitation: +30%) and chemical (dissolved organic carbon: +10 mg/L, total phosphorus: +45 mu g/L and total nitrogen: +1,000 mu g/L) gradient to test how temperature and productivity jointly affect the structure, biomass and community fatty acid content (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) of whole food webs. Increasing temperature and productivity shifted lake communities towards dominance of warmer, murky-water-adapted taxa, with a general increase in the biomass of primary producers, and secondary and tertiary consumers, while primary invertebrate consumers did not show equally clear trends. This process altered various trophic pyramid structures towards an hour glass shape in the warmest and most productive lakes. Increasing temperature and productivity had negative fatty acid content trends (mg EPA + DHA/g dry weight) in primary producers and primary consumers, but not in secondary nor tertiary fish consumers. The massive biomass increment of fish led to increasing areal fatty acid content (kg EPA + DHA/ha) towards increasingly warmer, more productive lakes, but there were no significant trends in other trophic levels. Increasing temperature and productivity are shifting subarctic lake communities towards systems characterized by increasing dominance of cyanobacteria and cyprinid fish, although decreasing quality in terms of EPA + DHA content was observed only in phytoplankton, zooplankton and profundal benthos.
  • Taipale, S. J.; Vuorio, K.; Strandberg, U.; Kahilainen, K. K.; Jarvinen, M.; Hiltunen, M.; Peltomaa, E.; Kankaala, P. (2016)
    Fish are an important source of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for birds, mammals and humans. In aquatic food webs, these highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) are essential for many physiological processes and mainly synthetized by distinct phytoplankton taxa. Consumers at different trophic levels obtain essential fatty acids from their diet because they cannot produce these sufficiently de novo. Here, we evaluated how the increase in phosphorus concentration (eutrophication) or terrestrial organic matter inputs (brownification) change EPA and DHA content in the phytoplankton. Then, we evaluated whether these changes can be seen in the EPA and DHA content of piscivorous European perch (Perca fluviatilis), which is a widely distributed species and commonly consumed by humans. Data from 713 lakes showed statistically significant differences in the abundance of EPA- and DHA-synthesizing phytoplankton as well as in the concentrations and content of these essential fatty acids among oligo-mesotrophic, eutrophic and dystrophic lakes. The EPA and DHA content of phytoplankton biomass (mg HUFA g(-1)) was significantly lower in the eutrophic lakes than in the oligo-mesotrophic or dystrophic lakes. We found a strong significant correlation between the DHA content in the muscle of piscivorous perch and phytoplankton DHA content (r = 0.85) as well with the contribution of DHA-synthesizing phytoplankton taxa (r = 0.83). Among all DHA-synthesizing phytoplankton this correlation was the strongest with the dinoflagellates (r = 0.74) and chrysophytes (r = 0.70). Accordingly, the EPA + DHA content of perch muscle decreased with increasing total phosphorus (r(2) = 0.80) and dissolved organic carbon concentration (r(2) = 0.83) in the lakes. Our results suggest that although eutrophication generally increase biomass production across different trophic levels, the high proportion of low-quality primary producers reduce EPA and DHA content in the food web up to predatory fish. Ultimately, it seems that lake eutrophication and brownification decrease the nutritional quality of fish for human consumers. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • Fransner, Filippa; Gustafsson, Erik; Tedesco, Letizia; Vichi, Marcello; Hordoir, Robinson; Roquet, Fabien; Spilling, Kristian; Kuznetsov, Ivan; Eilola, Kari; Morth, Carl-Magnus; Humborg, Christoph; Nycander, Jonas (2018)
    High inputs of nutrients and organic matter make coastal seas places of intense air-sea CO2 exchange. Due to their complexity, the role of coastal seas in the global air-sea CO2 exchange is, however, still uncertain. Here, we investigate the role of phytoplankton stoichiometric flexibility and extracellular DOC production for the seasonal nutrient and CO2 partial pressure (pCO(2)) dynamics in the Gulf of Bothnia, Northern Baltic Sea. A 3-D ocean biogeochemical-physical model with variable phytoplankton stoichiometry is for the first time implemented in the area and validated against observations. By simulating non-Redfieldian internal phytoplankton stoichiometry, and a relatively large production of extracellular dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the model adequately reproduces observed seasonal cycles in macronutrients and pCO(2). The uptake of atmospheric CO2 is underestimated by 50% if instead using the Redfield ratio to determine the carbon assimilation, as in other Baltic Sea models currently in use. The model further suggests, based on the observed drawdown of pCO(2), that observational estimates of organic carbon production in the Gulf of Bothnia, derived with the 14C method, may be heavily underestimated. We conclude that stoichiometric variability and uncoupling of carbon and nutrient assimilation have to be considered in order to better understand the carbon cycle in coastal seas.
  • Luoto, Tomi P.; Rantala, Marttiina V.; Kivilä, E. Henriikka; Nevalainen, Liisa (2019)
    A key question in aquatic elemental cycling is related to the influence of bottom water oxygen conditions in regulating the burial and release of carbon under climate warming. In this study, we used head capsules of Chironomidae larvae to assess community and diversity change between the past (estimated as Pre-Industrial Period) and present and to reconstruct changes in hypolimnetic oxygen conditions from 30 subarctic ecotonal lakes (northeastern Lapland) using the top-bottom paleolimnological approach applying surface sediment (topmost 0-2 cm) and reference (4-5 cm) samples. Subsequently, we tested the findings against dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration of the sites. We found that the benthic communities were statistically dissimilar between the past and the present with largest changes occurring in the more transparent oligo-mesohumic lakes. However, murky polyhumic lakes displayed uniformly a decrease in diversity. The chironomid-inferred oxygen values showed a general decrease toward the present with largest shifts in low-DOC lakes, whereas no significant changes were found in the hypolimnetic oxygen conditions of high-DOC lakes, which were often located in wet-land areas. These finding suggest that lakes associated with constant organic carbon inputs are more resilient toward climate-induced reductions in hypolimnetic oxygen. (c) 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Elovaara, Samu; Degerlund, Maria; Franklin, Daniel J.; Kaartokallio, Hermanni; Tamelander, Tobias (2020)
    Cell death drives the magnitude and community composition of phytoplankton and can result in the conversion of particulate organic carbon to dissolved organic carbon (DOC), thereby affecting carbon cycling in the aquatic food web. We used a membrane integrity probe (Sytox Green) to study the seasonal variation in the percentage of viable cells in the phytoplankton population in an estuary in the northern Baltic Sea for 21 months. The associated dissolved and particulate organic matter concentrations were also studied. The viable fraction of phytoplankton cells varied from 
  • Elovaara, Samu; Degerlund, Maria; Franklin, Daniel J.; Kaartokallio, Hermanni; Tamelander, Tobias (Springer Link, 2020)
    Hydrobiologia 847 11 (2020)
    Cell death drives the magnitude and community composition of phytoplankton and can result in the conversion of particulate organic carbon to dissolved organic carbon (DOC), thereby affecting carbon cycling in the aquatic food web. We used a membrane integrity probe (Sytox Green) to study the seasonal variation in the percentage of viable cells in the phytoplankton population in an estuary in the northern Baltic Sea for 21 months. The associated dissolved and particulate organic matter concentrations were also studied. The viable fraction of phytoplankton cells varied from < 20% to almost 100%, with an average of 62%. Viability was highest when a single phytoplankton group (diatoms or dinoflagellates) dominated the community. Viability of sinking phytoplankton cells, including some motile species, was in general as high as in surface water. Changes in viability were not closely related to nutrient concentrations, virus-like particle abundance, seawater temperature or salinity. There was a weak but significant negative correlation between viability and DOC, although at this location, the DOC pool was mainly influenced by the inflow of riverine water. This study demonstrates that cell viability, and its relationship with carbon export, is highly variable in the complex microbial populations common within estuarine and coastal marine ecosystems.
  • Huovinen, Lena (Helsingin yliopisto, 2021)
    Lake ecosystems are shaped by water chemistry processes that affect the lake environment and the species communities within. Changes in the water chemistry thus have far-reaching consequences. Water colour is one variable that affects water chemistry and stems from humic substances in the water. Dark water reduces light availability and also affects nutrient and oxygen availability. A trend of brownification of freshwater systems has been observed in recent years and it is expected to influence species community’s diversity and composition. The aim of this thesis was to study whether brownification is an ongoing issue in the study lakes and whether it has had a negative effect on phytoplankton diversity and resulted in shifts in the phytoplankton composition. A data set including about a 100 lakes in Finland with measurements from 1965 up until now served as the study system which was analysed with statistical methods. The results indicated a brownification trend in the past decades. The brownification so far had a positive impact on species richness but a negative impact on beta diversity. Brownification also affected species composition. Flagellates and autotrophic species increased in darker waters but mixotrophic species that are known to dominate in dark water colour, did not show a clear increase with water colour. Other hydrological variables than water colour could have had a bigger impact on the phytoplankton community than water colour but future monitoring of the phytoplankton community is recommended to see if water colour will have a negative impact on species diversity in the future.
  • Niinikoski-Fusswinkel, Paula; Purkamo, Lotta; Karhu, Juha (2020)
    This study examines the effect of poly-aluminium chloride (PACl) pre-treatment on the biological purification process taking place during managed aquifer recharge (MAR). PACl treatment is used in waste and surface water treatment to remove organic material. PACl can decrease the organic carbon contents of water significantly. However, aluminium is toxic to microbes, which may be detrimental when the PACl treatment is followed by infiltration into an aquifer (MAR). In this study the effect of pre-treatment with PACl on the water purification process in MAR was examined, by using sediment from a MAR site in four test columns. Two columns were filled with PACl-treated water, and the remaining ones with river water without PACl. The residence time of water in the columns was raised from direct sampling gradually to 64 days. Among the parameters monitored were the pH of the water, microbial activity and the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The results showed active decomposition in all columns. Decomposition of organic matter, and the amount of living/active microbial cells, was marginally higher in the untreated water, which could imply a better functioning MAR system. However, this may also be due to higher DOC starting concentration.
  • Zhu, Xudan; Chen, Liang; Pumpanen, Jukka; Ojala, Anne; Zobitz, John; Zhou, Xuan; Laudon, Hjalmar; Palviainen, Marjo; Neitola, Kimmo; Berninger, Frank (2022)
    Abstract The past decades have witnessed an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the catchments of the Northern Hemisphere. Increasing terrestrial productivity and changing hydrology may be reasons for the increases in DOC concentration. The aim of this study is to investigate the impacts of increased terrestrial productivity and changed hydrology following climate change on DOC concentrations. We tested and quantified the effects of gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (RE) and discharge on DOC concentrations in boreal catchments over three years. As catchment characteristics can regulate the extent of rising DOC concentrations caused by the regional or global environmental changes, we selected four catchments with different sizes (small, medium and large) and landscapes (forest, mire and forest-mire mixed). We applied multiple models: Wavelet coherence analysis detected the delay-effects of terrestrial productivity and discharge on aquatic DOC variations of boreal catchments; thereafter, the distributed-lag linear models (DLMs) quantified the contributions of each factor on DOC variations. Our results showed that the combined impacts of terrestrial productivity and discharge explained 62% of aquatic DOC variations on average across all sites, whereas discharge, GPP and RE accounted for 26%, 22% and 3%, respectively. The impact of gross primary production (GPP) and discharge on DOC changes was directly related to catchment size: GPP dominated DOC fluctuations in small catchments (1 km2). The direction of the relation between GPP and discharge on DOC varied. Increasing RE always made a positive contribution to DOC concentration. This study reveals that climate change-induced terrestrial greening and shifting hydrology change the DOC export from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. The work improves our mechanistic understanding of surface water DOC regulation in boreal catchments and confirms the importance of DOC fluxes in regulating ecosystem C budgets.
  • Palviainen, Marjo; Peltomaa, Elina; Laurén, Ari; Kinnunen, Niko; Ojala, Anne; Berninger, Frank; Zhu, Xudan; Pumpanen, Jukka (2022)
    Boreal peatiands are major sources of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to downstream aquatic ecosystems, and forest harvesting generally further increases the loading of DOC and nutrients. Continuous cover forestry (CCF) is proposed to be an environmentally more sustainable management option for peatland forests than conventional even-aged clear-cutting. However, the impacts of CCF on water quality, the biodegradability of DOC and consequent CO2 emissions from inland waters are poorly known. We studied the concentrations of N, P and DOC, the quality of DOC, and the mineralization of DOC to CO2 in ground water and ditch water in clear-cut, partially harvested, i.e. CCF, and uncut drained forests in Finland. Groundwater total N, NH4-N and PO4-P concentrations were significantly lower in CCF and uncut forest than in the clear-cut forest. Groundwater DOC concentrations were often highest in the clear-cut forest, where the water table was doser to the soil surface. Ditch water DOC and N concentrations were lowest next to the clear-cut area. DOC aromaticity in ground water was higher in the uncut forest than in the clear-cut and CCF, whereas ditch water aromaticity did not differ between the treatments. The biodegradation of DOC was studied by incubating water (at 15 degrees C for 24 h) 1, 3, 7 and 21 days after sampling. The results indicated that the majority of the CO2 production took place during the first three days, and CO2 fluxes were considerably higher from the ditch water than from the groundwater. The CO2 emissions were lower in summer than in the other seasons. Ditch water and groundwater CO2 production were generally significantly higher in the clear-cut than in the uncut forest. The results suggest that CCF can decrease the nutrient concentrations as well as CO2 emissions from inland waters compared to conventional clear-cutting. (C) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.