Browsing by Subject "DUST EMISSION"

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  • Liu, Tie; Li, Pak Shing; Juvela, Mika; Kim, Kee-Tae; Evans, Neal J.; Di Francesco, James; Liu, Sheng-Yuan; Yuan, Jinghua; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi; Zhang, Qizhou; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Fuller, Gary; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Koch, P. M.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Ristorcelli, I.; Kang, Sung-ju; Chen, Huei-Ru; Hirano, N.; Wu, Yuefang; Sokolov, Vlas; Lee, Chang Won; White, Glenn J.; Wang, Ke; Eden, David; Li, Di; Thompson, Mark; Pattle, Kate M.; Soam, Archana; Nasedkin, Evert; Kim, Jongsoo; Kim, Gwanjeong; Lai, Shih-Ping; Park, Geumsook; Qiu, Keping; Zhang, Chuan-Peng; Alina, Dana; Eswaraiah, Chakali; Falgarone, Edith; Fich, Michel; Greaves, Jane; Gu, Q. -L.; Kwon, Woojin; Li, Hua-bai; Malinen, Johanna; Montier, Ludovic; Parsons, Harriet; Qin, Sheng-Li; Rawlings, Mark G.; Tang, Y. -W. (2018)
    Magnetic field plays a crucial role in shaping molecular clouds and regulating star formation, yet the complete information on the magnetic field is not well constrained owing to the limitations in observations. We study the magnetic field in the massive infrared dark cloud G035.39-00.33 from dust continuum polarization observations at 850 mu m with SCUBA-2/POL-2 at JCMT for the first time. The magnetic field tends to be perpendicular to the densest part of the main filament (F-M), whereas it has a less defined relative orientation in the rest of the structure, where it tends to be parallel to some diffuse regions. A mean plane-of-the-sky magnetic field strength of similar to 50 mu G for F-M is obtained using the Davis-Chandrasekhar-Fermi method. Based on (CO)-C-13 (1-0) line observations, we suggest a formation scenario of F-M due to large-scale (similar to 10 pc) cloud-cloud collision. Using additional NH3 line data, we estimate that F-M will be gravitationally unstable if it is only supported by thermal pressure and turbulence. The northern part of F-M, however, can be stabilized by a modest additional support from the local magnetic field. The middle and southern parts of F-M are likely unstable even if the magnetic field support is taken into account. We claim that the clumps in F-M may be supported by turbulence and magnetic fields against gravitational collapse. Finally, we identified for the first time a massive (similar to 200 M-circle dot, collapsing starless clump candidate, "c8," in G035.39-00.33. The magnetic field surrounding "c8" is likely pinched, hinting at an accretion flow along the filament.
  • Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Poutanen, T.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Valiviita, J.; Planck Collaboration (2014)
  • Ade, P. A. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Poutanen, T.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tuovinen, J.; Valiviita, J.; Planck Collaboration (2014)
  • Benedetti, Angela; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Knippertz, Peter; Marsham, John H.; Di Giuseppe, Francesca; Remy, Samuel; Basart, Sara; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Ian M.; Menut, Laurent; Mona, Lucia; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Baklanov, Alexander; Brooks, Malcolm; Colarco, Peter R.; Cuevas, Emilio; da Silva, Arlindo; Escribano, Jeronimo; Flemming, Johannes; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jorba, Oriol; Kazadzis, Stelios; Kinne, Stefan; Popp, Thomas; Quinn, Patricia K.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu; Terradellas, Enric (2018)
    Numerical prediction of aerosol particle properties has become an important activity at many research and operational weather centers. This development is due to growing interest from a diverse set of stakeholders, such as air quality regulatory bodies, aviation and military authorities, solar energy plant managers, climate services providers, and health professionals. Owing to the complexity of atmospheric aerosol processes and their sensitivity to the underlying meteorological conditions, the prediction of aerosol particle concentrations and properties in the numerical weather prediction (NWP) framework faces a number of challenges. The modeling of numerous aerosol-related parameters increases computational expense. Errors in aerosol prediction concern all processes involved in the aerosol life cycle including (a) errors on the source terms (for both anthropogenic and natural emissions), (b) errors directly dependent on the meteorology (e.g., mixing, transport, scavenging by precipitation), and (c) errors related to aerosol chemistry (e.g., nucleation, gas-aerosol partitioning, chemical transformation and growth, hygroscopicity). Finally, there are fundamental uncertainties and significant processing overhead in the diverse observations used for verification and assimilation within these systems. Indeed, a significant component of aerosol forecast development consists in streamlining aerosol-related observations and reducing the most important errors through model development and data assimilation. Aerosol particle observations from satellite- and ground-based platforms have been crucial to guide model development of the recent years and have been made more readily available for model evaluation and assimilation. However, for the sustainability of the aerosol particle prediction activities around the globe, it is crucial that quality aerosol observations continue to be made available from different platforms (space, near surface, and aircraft) and freely shared. This paper reviews current requirements for aerosol observations in the context of the operational activities carried out at various global and regional centers. While some of the requirements are equally applicable to aerosol-climate, the focus here is on global operational prediction of aerosol properties such as mass concentrations and optical parameters. It is also recognized that the term "requirements" is loosely used here given the diversity in global aerosol observing systems and that utilized data are typically not from operational sources. Most operational models are based on bulk schemes that do not predict the size distribution of the aerosol particles. Others are based on a mix of "bin" and bulk schemes with limited capability of simulating the size information. However the next generation of aerosol operational models will output both mass and number density concentration to provide a more complete description of the aerosol population. A brief overview of the state of the art is provided with an introduction on the importance of aerosol prediction activities. The criteria on which the requirements for aerosol observations are based are also outlined. Assimilation and evaluation aspects are discussed from the perspective of the user requirements.
  • Väisälä, M. S.; Gent, F. A.; Juvela, M.; Käpylä, M. J. (2018)
    Context. Efforts to compare polarization measurements with synthetic observations from magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models have previously concentrated on the scale of molecular clouds. Aims. We extend the model comparisons to kiloparsec scales, taking into account hot shocked gas generated by supernovae and a non-uniform dynamo-generated magnetic field at both large and small scales down to 4 pc spatial resolution. Methods. We used radiative transfer calculations to model dust emission and polarization on top of MHD simulations. We computed synthetic maps of column density N-H, polarization fraction p, and polarization angle dispersion S, and studied their dependencies on important properties of MHD simulations. These include the large-scale magnetic field and its orientation, the small-scale magnetic field, and supernova-driven shocks. Results. Similar filament-like structures of S as seen in the Planck all-sky maps are visible in our synthetic results, although the smallest scale structures are absent from our maps. Supernova-driven shock fronts and S do not show significant correlation. Instead, S can clearly be attributed to the distribution of the small-scale magnetic field. We also find that the large-scale magnetic field influences the polarization properties, such that, for a given strength of magnetic fluctuation, a strong plane of the sky mean field weakens the observed S, while strengthening p. The anticorrelation of p and S, and decreasing p as a function of NH are consistent across all synthetic observations. The magnetic fluctuations follow an exponential distribution, rather than Gaussian characteristic of flows with intermittent repetitive shocks. Conclusions. The observed polarization properties and column densities are sensitive to the line-of-sight distance over which the emission is integrated. Studying synthetic maps as the function of maximum integration length will further help with the interpretation of observations. The effects of the large-scale magnetic field orientation on the polarization properties are difficult to be quantified from observations solely, but MHD models might turn out to be useful for separating the effect of the large-scale mean field.