Browsing by Subject "DYNAMO"

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  • Willamo, T.; Hackman, T.; Lehtinen, J. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Ilyin, I.; Henry, G. W.; Jetsu, L.; Kochukhov, O.; Piskunov, N. (2019)
    Context. Starspots are important manifestations of stellar magnetic activity. By studying their behaviour in young solar analogues, we can unravel the properties of their magnetic cycles. This gives crucial information of the underlying dynamo process. Comparisons with the solar cycle enable us to infer knowledge about how the solar dynamo has evolved during the Sun's lifetime. Aims. Here we study the correlation between photometric brightness variations, spottedness, and mean temperature in V889 Her, a young solar analogue. Our data covers 18 years of spectroscopic and 25 years of photometric observations. Methods. We use Doppler imaging to derive temperature maps from high-resolution spectra. We use the Continuous Period Search method to retrieve mean V-magnitudes from photometric data. Results. Our Doppler imaging maps show a persistent polar spot structure varying in strength. This structure is centred slightly off the rotational pole. The mean temperature derived from the maps shows an overall decreasing trend, as does the photometric mean brightness, until it reaches its minimum around 2017. The filling factor of cool spots, however, shows only a weak tendency to anti-correlate with the decreasing mean brightness. Conclusions. We interpret V889 Her to have entered into a grand maximum in its activity. The clear relation between the mean temperature of the Doppler imaging surface maps and the mean magnitude supports the reliability of the Doppler images. The lack of correlation between the mean magnitude and the spottedness may indicate that bright features in the Doppler images are real.
  • Kilpua, E. K. J.; Olspert, N.; Grigorievskiy, A.; Kapyla, M. J.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Miyahara, H.; Kataoka, R.; Pelt, J.; Liu, Y. D. (2015)
    We study the relation between strong and extreme geomagnetic storms and solar cycle characteristics. The analysis uses an extensive geomagnetic index AA data set spanning over 150 yr. complemented by the Kakioka magnetometer recordings. We apply Pearson correlation statistics and estimate the significance of the correlation with a bootstrapping technique. We show that the correlation between the storm occurrence and the strength of the solar cycle decreases from a clear positive correlation with increasing storm magnitude toward a negligible relationship. Hence, the quieter Sun can also launch superstorms that may lead to significant societal and economic impact. Our results show that while weaker storms occur most frequently in the declining phase, the stronger storms have the tendency to occur near solar maximum. Our analysis suggests that the most extreme solar eruptions do not have a direct connection between the solar large-scale dynamo-generated magnetic field, but are rather associated with smaller-scale dynamo and resulting turbulent magnetic fields. The phase distributions of sunspots and storms becoming increasingly in phase with increasing storm strength, on the other hand, may indicate that the extreme storms are related to the toroidal component of the solar large-scale field.
  • Käpylä, M. J.; Gent, F. A.; Väisälä, M. S.; Sarson, G. R. (2018)
    Context. The forcing of interstellar turbulence, driven mainly by supernova (SN) explosions, is irrotational in nature, but the development of significant amounts of vorticity and helicity, accompanied by large-scale dynamo action, has been reported. Aims. Several earlier investigations examined vorticity production in simpler systems; here all the relevant processes can be considered simultaneously. We also investigate the mechanisms for the generation of net helicity and large-scale flow in the system. Methods. We use a three-dimensional, stratified, rotating and shearing local simulation domain of the size 1 x 1 x 2 kpc(3), forced with SN explosions occurring at a rate typical of the solar neighbourhood in the MilkyWay. In addition to the nominal simulation run with realistic Milky Way parameters, we vary the rotation and shear rates, but keep the absolute value of their ratio fixed. Reversing the sign of shear vs. rotation allows us to separate the rotation-and shear-generated contributions. Results. As in earlier studies, we find the generation of significant amounts of vorticity, the rotational flow comprising on average 65% of the total flow. The vorticity production can be related to the baroclinicity of the flow, especially in the regions of hot, dilute clustered supernova bubbles. In these regions, the vortex stretching acts as a sink of vorticity. In denser, compressed regions, the vortex stretching amplifies vorticity, but remains sub-dominant to baroclinicity. The net helicities produced by rotation and shear are of opposite signs for physically motivated rotation laws, with the solar neighbourhood parameters resulting in the near cancellation of the total net helicity. We also find the excitation of oscillatory mean flows, the strength and oscillation period of which depend on the Coriolis and shear parameters; we interpret these as signatures of the anisotropic-kinetic-alpha (AKA) effect. We use the method of moments to fit for the turbulent transport coefficients, and find alpha(AKA) values of the order 3-5 km s(-1). Conclusions. Even in a weakly rotationally and shear-influenced system, small-scale anisotropies can lead to significant effects at large scales. Here we report on two consequences of such effects, namely on the generation of net helicity and on the emergence of large-scale flows by the AKA effect, the latter detected for the first time in a direct numerical simulation of a realistic astrophysical system.