Browsing by Subject "DYSFUNCTION"

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  • Tuohinen, Suvi Sirkku; Skyttä, Tanja; Huhtala, Heini; Poutanen, Tuija; Virtanen, Vesa; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Raatikainen, Pekka (2021)
    BACKGROUND Radiation therapy (RT) results in myocardial changes consisting of diffuse fibrosis, which may result in changes in diastolic function. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to explore RT-associated changes in left ventricular (LV) diastolic function. METHODS Sixty chemotherapy-naive patients with left-sided, early-stage breast cancer were studied with speckle tracking echocardiography at 3 time points: prior to, immediately after, and 3 years after RT. Global and regional early diastolic strain rate (SRe) were quantified, as were parameters of systolic function. RESULTS Regional changes in SRe, particularly the apical and anteroseptat segments, were observed over time and were more evident than global changes. The apical SRe declined from a median of 1.24 (interquartile range: 1.01 to 1.39) s(-1) at baseline to 1.02 (interquartile range: 0.79 to 1.15) s(-1) at 3 years of follow-up (p < 0.001). This decline was associated with the left ventricular maximal radiation dose (beta = 0.36, p = 0.007). The global SRe was CONCLUSIONS RT resulted in changes in the SRe in the apical and anteroseptat segments over 3 years of follow-up. Changes in SRe apical segments were present even in patients with preserved systolic function and were independently associated with RT dose and cardiovascular comorbidities. (C) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier on behalf of the American College of Cardiology Foundation.
  • Tuohinen, Suvi Sirkku; Aula, Hanna; Skyttä, Tanja; Huhtala, Heini; Keski-Pukkila, Konsta; Nikus, Kjell; Virtanen, Vesa; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Raatikainen, Pekka (2022)
    Background/Aim: Radiotherapy (RT) induces late changes in all cardiac structures. Most studies of early changes focus on individual parameters. Patients and Methods: Data from eighty early-stage breast cancer patients at baseline, post-RT and three-year follow-up visit were assessed prospectively. Changes in ten cardiac parameters were collected including electrocardiogram (ECG), echocardiography, and biomarkers. A percentage of abnormal changes was calculated. Results: The mean heart radiation dose (Dmean) was independently associated with the increased incidence of changes post-RT (?? =0.403, p
  • Licht, Tamar; Kreisel, Tirzah; Biala, Yoav; Mohan, Sandesh; Yaari, Yoel; Anisimov, Andrey; Alitalo, Kari; Keshet, Eli (2020)
    Multiple insults to the brain lead to neuronal cell death, thus raising the question to what extent can lost neurons be replenished by adult neurogenesis. Here we focused on the hippocampus and especially the dentate gyrus (DG), a vulnerable brain region and one of the two sites where adult neuronal stem cells (NSCs) reside. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis was extensively studied with regard to its contribution to cognitive enhancement, we focused on their underestimated capability to repair a massively injured, nonfunctional DG. To address this issue, we inflicted substantial DG-specific damage in mice of either sex either by diphtheria toxin-based ablation of >50% of mature DG granule cells (GCs) or by prolonged brain-specific VEGF overexpression culminating in extensive, highly selective loss of DG GCs (thereby also reinforcing the notion of selective DG vulnerability). The neurogenic system promoted effective regeneration by increasing NSCs proliferation/survival rates, restoring a nearly original DG mass, promoting proper rewiring of regenerated neurons to their afferent and efferent partners, and regaining of lost spatial memory. Notably, concomitantly with the natural age-related decline in the levels of neurogenesis, the regenerative capacity of the hippocampus also subsided with age. The study thus revealed an unappreciated regenerative potential of the young DG and suggests hippocampal NSCs as a critical reservoir enabling recovery from catastrophic DG damage.
  • Annanmaki, Tua; Palmu, Kirsi; Murros, Kari; Partanen, Juhani (2017)
    The diagnosis of cognitive impairment and dementia often occurring with Parkinson's disease (PD) is still based on the clinical picture and neuropsychological examination. Ancillary methods to detect cognitive decline in these patients are, therefore, needed. Alterations in the latencies and amplitudes of evoked response potential (ERP) components N100 and P200 have been described in PD. Due to limited number of studies their relation to cognitive deficits in PD remains obscure. The present study was designed to examine if alterations in the N100- and P200-potentials associate with neuropsychological impairment in PD. EEG-ERP was conducted to 18 PD patients and 24 healthy controls. The patients underwent a thorough neuropsychological evaluation. The controls were screened for cognitive impairment with Consortium to Establish Alzheimer's disease (CERAD)-testing and a normal result were required to be included in the study. The N100-latency was prolonged in the patients compared to the controls (p = 0.05). In the patients, the N100 latency correlated significantly with a visual working memory task (p = 0.01). Also N100 latency was prolonged and N100 amplitude habituation diminished in the patients achieving poorly in this task. We conclude that prolonged N100-latency and diminished amplitude habituation associate with visual working memory impairment in PD.
  • Penttinen, Kirsi; Swan, Heikki; Vanninen, Sari; Paavola, Jere; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Kontula, Kimmo; Aalto-Setala, Katriina (2015)
    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a highly malignant inherited arrhythmogenic disorder. Type 1 CPVT (CPVT1) is caused by cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) gene mutations resulting in abnormal calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Dantrolene, an inhibitor of sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release, has been shown to rescue this abnormal Ca2+ release in vitro. We assessed the antiarrhythmic efficacy of dantrolene in six patients carrying various RyR2 mutations causing CPVT. The patients underwent exercise stress test before and after dantrolene infusion. Dantrolene reduced the number of premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) on average by 74% (range 33-97) in four patients with N-terminal or central mutations in the cytosolic region of the RyR2 protein, while dantrolene had no effect in two patients with mutations in or near the transmembrane domain. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were generated from all the patients and differentiated into spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes (CMs). The antiarrhythmic effect of dantrolene was studied in CMs after adrenaline stimulation by Ca2+ imaging. In iPSC derived CMs with RyR2 mutations in the N-terminal or central region, dantrolene suppressed the Ca2+ cycling abnormalities in 80% (range 65-97) of cells while with mutations in or near the transmembrane domain only in 23 or 32% of cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that dantrolene given intravenously shows antiarrhythmic effects in a portion of CPVT1 patients and that iPSC derived CM models replicate these individual drug responses. These findings illustrate the potential of iPSC models to individualize drug therapy of inherited diseases.
  • Tynjälä, Anniina; Forsblom, Carol; Harjutsalo, Valma; Groop, Per-Henrik; Gordin, Daniel (2020)
    OBJECTIVE Type 1 diabetes is accompanied by a significant burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is poorly explained by traditional risk factors. We therefore aimed to explore whether arterial stiffness estimated by the augmentation index (AIx) predicts mortality in individuals with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS After baseline examination comprising pulse wave analysis by applanation tonometry alongside assessment of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, 906 individuals with type 1 diabetes from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study were followed up for a median of 8.2 years (interquartile range 5.7-9.7). Associations between baseline hemodynamics, including AIx, and all-cause mortality as well as a composite of cardiovascular and/or diabetes-related mortality were investigated using multivariable Cox regression models. RESULTS The 67 individuals who died during follow-up had higher baseline AIx (median 28% [interquartile range 21-33] vs. 19% [9-27];P<0.001) compared with those alive. This association was independent of conventional risk factors (age, sex, BMI, HbA(1c), estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], and previous CVD event) in Cox regression analysis (standardized hazard ratio 1.71 [95% CI 1.10-2.65];P= 0.017) and sustained in a subanalysis of individuals with chronic kidney disease. Similarly, higher AIx was associated with the composite secondary end point of cardiovascular and diabetes-related death (N= 53) after adjustments for sex, BMI, eGFR, previous CVD event, and height (standardized hazard ratio 2.30 [1.38-3.83];P= 0.001). CONCLUSIONS AIx predicts all-cause mortality as well as a composite cardiovascular and/or diabetes-related cause of death in individuals with type 1 diabetes, independent of established cardiovascular risk factors.
  • Koskinen, Sini M.; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Kujala, Teija; Kaprio, Jaakko; O'Donnell, Brian F.; Osipova, Daria; Viken, Richard J.; Naatanen, Risto; Rose, Richard J. (2022)
    Major depression is associated with alterations in the auditory P3 event-related potential (ERP). However, the persistence of these abnormalities after recovery from depressive episodes, especially in young adults, is not well known. Furthermore, the potential influence of substance use on this association is poorly understood. Young adult twin pairs (N = 177) from the longitudinal FinnTwin16 study were studied with a psychiatric interview, and P3a and P3b ERPs elicited by task-irrelevant novel sounds and targets, respectively. Dyadic linear mixed effect models were used to distinguish the effects of lifetime major depressive disorder from familial factors and effects of alcohol problem drinking and tobacco smoking. P3a amplitude was significantly increased and P3b latency decreased, in individuals with a history of lifetime major depression, when controlling the fixed effects of alcohol abuse, tobacco, gender, twins' birth order, and zygosity. These results suggest that past lifetime major depressive disorder may be associated with enhanced attentional sensitivity.
  • Tuohinen, Suvi Sirkku; Rankinen, Jani; Skyttä, Tanja; Huhtala, Heini; Virtanen, Vesa; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Raatikainen, Pekka; Nikus, Kjell (2018)
    Background: ST segment depression (STD) and T wave inversion (TWI) are typical electrocardiographic (ECG) findings in non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). In ST elevation myocardial infarction, ST changes represent transmural ischemia. The pathophysiological mechanisms of the ECG changes in NSTEMI are unclear. Purpose: We studied the associations between ECG and the echocardiographic findings in NSTEMI patients. Methods: Twenty patients with acute NSTEMI were recruited during their hospital stay. A comprehensive echocardiography study was performed. The findings were compared with blinded ECG analyses. Results: Nine (45%) patients had STD, and 16 (85%) patients had TWI. In multivariable analysis, STD was independently associated with a lower global early diastolic strain rate (beta=-5.061, p=0.033). TWI was independently associated with lower circumferential strain (beta=0.132, p =0.032). Conclusions: The typical ECG changes in NSTEMI patients were associated with subtle echocardiographic changes. STD was related to changes in diastolic function, and TWI was associated with systolic deterioration. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Rajani, Rikesh M.; Ratelade, Julien; Domenga-Denier, Valerie; Hase, Yoshiki; Kalimo, Hannu; Kalaria, Raj N.; Joutel, Anne (2019)
    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a genetic paradigm of small vessel disease (SVD) caused by NOTCH3 mutations that stereotypically lead to the vascular accumulation of NOTCH3 around smooth muscle cells and pericytes. White matter (WM) lesions (WMLs) are the earliest and most frequent abnormalities, and can be associated with lacunar infarcts and enlarged perivascular spaces (ePVS). The prevailing view is that blood brain barrier (BBB) leakage, possibly mediated by pericyte deficiency, plays a pivotal role in the formation of WMLs. Herein, we investigated the involvement of BBB leakage and pericyte loss in CADASIL WMLs. Using post-mortem brain tissue from 12 CADASIL patients and 10 age-matched controls, we found that WMLs are heterogeneous, and that BBB leakage reflects the heterogeneity. Specifically, while fibrinogen extravasation was significantly increased in WMLs surrounding ePVS and lacunes, levels of fibrinogen leakage were comparable in WMLs without other pathology ("pure" WMLs) to those seen in the normal appearing WM of patients and controls. In a mouse model of CADASIL, which develops WMLs but no lacunes or ePVS, we detected no extravasation of endogenous fibrinogen, nor of injected small or large tracers in WMLs. Moreover, there was no evidence of pericyte coverage modification in any type of WML in either CADASIL patients or mice. These data together indicate that WMLs in CADASIL encompass distinct classes of WM changes and argue against the prevailing hypothesis that pericyte coverage loss and BBB leakage are the primary drivers of WMLs. Our results also have important implications for the interpretation of studies on the BBB in living patients, which may misinterpret evidence of BBB leakage within WM hyperintensities as suggesting a BBB related mechanism for all WMLs, when in fact this may only apply to a subset of these lesions.
  • Turunen, Antti; Kuuliala, Antti; Mustonen, Harri; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kylänpää, Leena; Kuuliala, Krista (2021)
    Objectives Clinical practice lacks biomarkers to predict the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP). We studied if intracellular signaling of circulating leukocytes could predict persistent organ dysfunction (OD) and secondary infections in AP. Methods A venous blood sample was taken from 174 patients with AP 72 hours or less from onset of symptoms and 31 healthy controls. Phosphorylation levels (p) of appropriately stimulated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), STAT6, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B), Akt, and nonstimulated STAT3 in monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes was measured using phosphospecific flow cytometry. Results The patients showed higher pSTAT3 and lower pSTAT1, pSTAT6, pNF-kappa B, and pAkt than healthy controls. pSTAT3 in all leukocyte subtypes studied increased, and pSTAT1 in monocytes and T cells decreased in an AP severity-wise manner. In patients without OD at sampling, high pSTAT3 in monocytes and T lymphocytes were associated with development of persistent OD. In patients with OD, low interleukin-4-stimulated pSTAT6 in monocytes and neutrophils and Escherichia coli-stimulated pNF-kappa B in neutrophils predicted OD persistence. High pSTAT3 in monocytes, CD8(+) T cells, and neutrophils; low pSTAT1 in monocytes and T cells; and low pNF-kappa B in lymphocytes predicted secondary infections. Conclusions Leukocyte STAT3, STAT1, STAT6, and NF-kappa Beta phosphorylations are potential predictors of AP severity.
  • ARIA Grp; Bousquet, Jean; Anto, Josep M.; Czarlewski, Wienczyslawa; Haahtela, Tari; Zuberbier, Torsten; Erhola, Marina (2021)
    Large differences in COVID-19 death rates exist between countries and between regions of the same country. Some very low death rate countries such as Eastern Asia, Central Europe, or the Balkans have a common feature of eating large quantities of fermented foods. Although biases exist when examining ecological studies, fermented vegetables or cabbage have been associated with low death rates in European countries. SARS-CoV-2 binds to its receptor, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). As a result of SARS-CoV-2 binding, ACE2 downregulation enhances the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT(1)R) axis associated with oxidative stress. This leads to insulin resistance as well as lung and endothelial damage, two severe outcomes of COVID-19. The nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is the most potent antioxidant in humans and can block in particular the AT(1)R axis. Cabbage contains precursors of sulforaphane, the most active natural activator of Nrf2. Fermented vegetables contain many lactobacilli, which are also potent Nrf2 activators. Three examples are: kimchi in Korea, westernized foods, and the slum paradox. It is proposed that fermented cabbage is a proof-of-concept of dietary manipulations that may enhance Nrf2-associated antioxidant effects, helpful in mitigating COVID-19 severity.
  • Hemanthakumar, Karthik Amudhala; Fang, Shentong; Anisimov, Andrey; Mäyränpää, Mikko I.; Mervaala, Eero; Kivelä, Riikka (2021)
    Aging, obesity, hypertension, and physical inactivity are major risk factors for endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease (CVD). We applied fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), RNA sequencing, and bioinformatic methods to investigate the common effects of CVD risk factors in mouse cardiac endothelial cells (ECs). Aging, obesity, and pressure overload all upregulated pathways related to TGF-beta signaling and mesenchymal gene expression, inflammation, vascular permeability, oxidative stress, collagen synthesis, and cellular senescence, whereas exercise training attenuated most of the same pathways. We identified collagen chaperone Serpinhl (also called as Hsp47) to be significantly increased by aging and obesity and repressed by exercise training. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that increased SERPINH1 in human ECs induced mesenchymal properties, while its silencing inhibited collagen deposition. Our data demonstrate that CVD risk factors significantly remodel the transcriptomic landscape of cardiac ECs inducing inflammatory, senescence, and mesenchymal features. SERPINH1 was identified as a potential therapeutic target in ECs.
  • Hokkanen, Laura; Barbosa, Fernando; Ponchel, Amelie; Constantinou, Marios; Kosmidis, Mary H.; Varako, Nataliya; Kasten, Erich; Mondini, Sara; Lettner, Sandra; Baker, Gus; Persson, Bengt A.; Hessen, Erik (2020)
    The prevalence and negative impact of brain disorders are increasing. Clinical Neuropsychology is a specialty dedicated to understanding brain-behavior relationships, applying such knowledge to the assessment of cognitive, affective, and behavioral functioning associated with brain disorders, and designing and implementing effective treatments. The need for services goes beyond neurological diseases and has increased in areas of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, among others. In Europe, a great deal of variability exists in the education and training of Clinical Neuropsychologists. Training models include master's programs, continuing education courses, doctoral programs, and/or post-doctoral specialization depending on the country, with no common framework of requirements, although patients' needs demand equal competencies across Europe. In the past 5 years, the Standing Committee on Clinical Neuropsychology of the European Federation of Psychologists' Association has conducted a series of surveys and interviews with experts in the field representing 30 European countries. The information, along with information from the existing literature, is used in presenting an overview of current and relevant topics related to policy and guidelines in the training and competencies in Clinical Neuropsychology. An option for the way forward is the EuroPsy Specialist Certificate, which is currently offered in Work and Organizational Psychology, and in psychotherapy. It builds upon the basic certificate and complements national standards without overriding them. General principles can be found that can set the basis for a common, solid, and comprehensive specialty education/training, sharpening the Neuropsychologists' competencies across Europe. The requirements in Clinical Neuropsychology should be comparable to those for the existing specialty areas in the EuroPsy model. Despite the perceived challenges, developing a specialist certificate appears a step forward for the development of Clinical Neuropsychology. Recommendations are proposed toward a shared framework of competencies by the means of a common level of education/training for the professionals in Europe. Benchmarking training standards and competencies across Europe has the potential of providing protection against unqualified and ethically questionable practice, creating transparency, raising the general European standard, and promoting mobility of both Clinical Neuropsychologists and patients in Europe, for the benefit of the professional field and the population.
  • Kovacs, Zsuzsanna Z. A.; Szucs, Gergo; Freiwan, Marah; Kovacs, Monika G.; Marvanykovi, Fanni M.; Hoa Dinh; Siska, Andrea; Farkas, Katalin; Kovacs, Ferenc; Kriston, Andras; Horvath, Peter; Kovari, Bence; Cserni, Balint Gabor; Cserni, Gabor; Foldesi, Imre; Csont, Tamas; Sarkozy, Marta (2021)
    Uremic cardiomyopathy is characterized by diastolic dysfunction (DD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and fibrosis. Angiotensin-II plays a major role in the development of uremic cardiomyopathy via nitro-oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms. In heart failure, the beta-3 adrenergic receptor (beta 3-AR) is up-regulated and coupled to endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated pathways, exerting antiremodeling effects. We aimed to compare the antiremodeling effects of the angiotensin-II receptor blocker losartan and the beta 3-AR agonist mirabegron in uremic cardiomyopathy. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) was induced by 5/6th nephrectomy in male Wistar rats. Five weeks later, rats were randomized into four groups: (1) sham-operated, (2) CKD, (3) losartan-treated (10 mg/kg/day) CKD, and (4) mirabegron-treated (10 mg/kg/day) CKD groups. At week 13, echocardiographic, histologic, laboratory, qRT-PCR, and Western blot measurements proved the development of uremic cardiomyopathy with DD, LVH, fibrosis, inflammation, and reduced eNOS levels, which were significantly ameliorated by losartan. However, mirabegron showed a tendency to decrease DD and fibrosis; but eNOS expression remained reduced. In uremic cardiomyopathy, beta 3-AR, sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA), and phospholamban levels did not change irrespective of treatments. Mirabegron reduced the angiotensin-II receptor 1 expression in uremic cardiomyopathy that might explain its mild antiremodeling effects despite the unchanged expression of the beta 3-AR.
  • Jalkanen, Jenni; Heikkila, Jukka; Kyrklund, Kristiina; Taskinen, Seppo (2016)
    Purpose: We evaluated the age at which boys with a history of posterior urethral valves after no or minimal anticholinergic medication achieve urinary continence and the factors contributing to continence. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the hospital records of all males treated for posterior urethral valves at a single institution between 1990 and 2008. Continence was considered to have been attained if no weekly wetting episodes occurred. We evaluated the influence of patient characteristics, including reduced kidney function and primary ring type ureteral stoma, on age at which continence was achieved. Results: A total of 76 patients were assessed. Achievement of daytime and nighttime urinary continence was markedly delayed in patients (mean +/- SD age 5.5 +/- 3.3 years and 5.4 +/- 3.0 years, respectively) compared to the reference population (2.3 +/- 0.5 and 2.9 +/- 1.2, p <0.001). Increased serum creatinine levels at age 5 years were associated with later daytime and nighttime continence (mean +/- SD 6.0 +/- 3.2 and 5.5 +/- 2.6 years, respectively, vs 4.1 +/- 2.3 and 3.7 +/- 1.4 years, respectively, in patients with normal serum creatinine, p Conclusions: Patients with posterior urethral valves achieve daytime and nighttime urinary continence significantly later than their healthy peers. Prenatal or neonatal diagnosis and high serum creatinine are associated with later attainment of continence.
  • Heiskanen, Jarkko S.; Ruohonen, Saku; Rovio, Suvi P.; Kytö, Ville; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Viikari, Jorma S. A.; Juonala, Markus; Laitinen, Tomi; Tossavainen, Päivi; Jokinen, Eero; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T. (2019)
    Decreased left ventricular (LV) diastolic function is associated with increased all-cause mortality and risk for a heart failure. The determinants of LV diastolic function have been mainly studied in elderly populations; however, the origin of LV heart failure may relate to the lifestyle factors acquired during the life course. Therefore, we examined biochemical, physiological, and lifestyle determinants of LV diastolic function in 34-49-year-old participants of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (Young Finns Study). In 2011, clinical examination and echocardiography were performed for 1928 participants (880 men and 1048 women; aged 34-49 years). LV diastolic function was primarily defined using E/e-ratio (population mean 4.8, range 2.1-9.0). In a multivariate model, systolic blood pressure (P <0.005), female sex (P <0.005), age (P <0.005), waist circumference (P = 0.024), smoking (P = 0.028), serum alanine aminotransferase (P = 0.032) were directly associated with E/e-ratio, while an inverse association was found for height (P <0.005). Additionally, a higher E/e-ratio was found in participants with concentric hypertrophy compared to normal cardiac geometry (P <0.005). Other indicators of the LV diastolic function including E/A-ratio and left atrial volume index showed similarly strong associations with systolic blood pressure and age. In conclusion, we identified systolic blood pressure, waist circumference and smoking as modifiable determinants of the LV diastolic function in the 34-49-year-old participants of the Young Finns Study.
  • Lehtisalo, Jenni; Lindstrom, Jaana; Ngandu, Tiia; Kivipelto, Miia; Ahtiluoto, Satu; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Eriksson, Johan G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Luchsinger, Jose A.; Finnish Diabet Prevention Study DP (2016)
    BackgroundType 2 diabetes is linked with cognitive dysfunction and dementia in epidemiological studies, but these observations are limited by lack of data on the exact timing of diabetes onset. We investigated diabetes, dysglycaemia, and cognition in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, in which the timing and duration of diabetes are well documented. MethodsThe Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study comprised middle-aged, overweight participants with impaired glucose tolerance but no diabetes at baseline (n=522), randomized to lifestyle intervention or a control group. After an intervention period (mean duration 4years) and follow-up (additional 9years), cognitive assessment with the CERAD test battery and Trail Making Test A (TMT) was executed twice within a 2-year interval. Of the 364 (70%) participants with cognitive assessments, 171 (47%) had developed diabetes. ResultsCognitive function did not differ between those who developed diabetes and those who did not. Lower mean 2-h glucose at an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and HbA(1C) during the intervention period predicted better performance in the TMT (p=0.012 and 0.024, respectively). Those without diabetes or with short duration of diabetes improved in CERAD total score between the two assessments (p=0.001) whereas those with long duration of diabetes did not (p=0.844). ConclusionsBetter glycemic control among persons with baseline impaired glucose tolerance predicted better cognitive performance 9years later in this secondary analysis of the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study population. In addition, learning effects in cognitive testing were not evident in people with long diabetes duration. Copyright (c) 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
  • Manca, Maria Laura; Solini, Anna; Haukka, Jani K.; Sandholm, Niina; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per Henrik; Ferrannini, Ele (2021)
    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) shows different clinical features in Types1 (T1D) and 2 diabetes (T2D). Metabolomics have recently provided useful contribution to the identification of biomarkers of CKD progression in either form of the disease. However, no studies have so far compared plasma metabolomics between T1D and T2D in order to identify differential signatures of progression of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline. Methods: We used two large cohorts of T1D (from Finland) and T2D (from Italy) patients followed up to 7 and 3 years, respectively. In both groups, progression was defined as the top quartile of yearly decline in eGFR. Pooled data from the two groups were analysed by univariate and bivariate random forest (RF), and confirmed by bivariate partial least squares (PLS) analysis, the response variables being type of diabetes and eGFR progression. Results: In progressors, yearly eGFR loss was significantly larger in T2D [-5.3 (3.0), median (interquartile range)mL/min/1.73 m2/year] than T1D [-3.7 (3.1) mL/min/1.73 m2/year; P = 0.018]. Out of several hundreds, bivariate RF extracted 22 metabolites associated with diabetes type (all higher in T1D than T2D except for 5-methylthioadenosine, pyruvate and β-hydroxypyruvate) and 13 molecules associated with eGFR progression (all higher in progressors than non-progressors except for sphyngomyelin). Three of the selected metabolites (histidylphenylalanine, leucylphenylalanine, tryptophylasparagine) showed a significant interaction between disease type and progression. Only eight metabolites were common to both bivariate RF and PLS. Conclusions: Identification of metabolomic signatures of CKD progression is partially dependent on the statistical model. Dual analysis identified molecules specifically associated with progressive renal impairment in both T1D and T2D.
  • Tani, Haruna; Mito, Takayuki; Velagapudi, Vidya; Ishikawa, Kaori; Umehara, Moe; Nakada, Kazuto; Suomalainen, Anu; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi (2019)
    In a previous study, we proposed that age-related mitochondrial respiration defects observed in elderly subjects are partially due to age-associated downregulation of nuclear-encoded genes, including serine hydroxymethyltransferase 2 (SHMT2), which is involved in mitochondrial one-carbon (1C) metabolism. This assertion is supported by evidence that the disruption of mouse Shmt2 induces mitochondrial respiration defects in mouse embryonic fibroblasts generated from Shmt2-knockout E13.5 embryos experiencing anaemia and lethality. Here, we elucidated the potential mechanisms by which the disruption of this gene induces mitochondrial respiration defects and embryonic anaemia using Shmt2-knockout E13.5 embryos. The livers but not the brains of Shmt2-knockout E13.5 embryos presented mitochondrial respiration defects and growth retardation. Metabolomic profiling revealed that Shmt2 deficiency induced foetal liver-specific downregulation of 1C-metabolic pathways that create taurine and nucleotides required for mitochondrial respiratory function and cell division, respectively, resulting in the manifestation of mitochondrial respiration defects and growth retardation. Given that foetal livers function to produce erythroblasts in mouse embryos, growth retardation in foetal livers directly induced depletion of erythroblasts. By contrast, mitochondrial respiration defects in foetal livers also induced depletion of erythroblasts as a consequence of the inhibition of erythroblast differentiation, resulting in the manifestation of anaemia in Shmt2-knockout E13.5 embryos.