Browsing by Subject "Dead wood"

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  • Heinaro, Einari; Tanhuanpaa, Topi; Yrttimaa, Tuomas; Holopainen, Markus; Vastaranta, Mikko (2021)
    Fallen trees decompose on the forest floor and create habitats for many species. Thus, mapping fallen trees allows identifying the most valuable areas regarding biodiversity, especially in boreal forests, enabling well-focused conservation and restoration actions. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is capable of characterizing forests and the underlying topography. However, its potential for detecting and characterizing fallen trees under varying boreal forest conditions is not yet well understood. ALS-based fallen tree detection methods could improve our understanding regarding the spatiotemporal characteristics of dead wood over large landscapes. We developed and tested an automatic method for mapping individual fallen trees from an ALS point cloud with a point density of 15 points/m2. The presented method detects fallen trees using iterative Hough line detection and delineates the trees around the detected lines using region growing. Furthermore, we conducted a detailed evaluation of how the performance of ALS-based fallen tree detection is impacted by characteristics of fallen trees and the structure of vegetation around them. The results of this study showed that large fallen trees can be detected with a high accuracy in old-growth forests. In contrast, the detection of fallen trees in young managed stands proved challenging. The presented method was able to detect 78% of the largest fallen trees (diameter at breast height, DBH > 300 mm), whereas 30% of all trees with a DBH over 100 mm were detected. The performance of the detection method was positively correlated with both the size of fallen trees and the size of living trees surrounding them. In contrast, the performance was negatively correlated with the amount of undergrowth, ground vegetation, and the state of decay of fallen trees. Especially undergrowth and ground vegetation impacted the performance negatively, as they covered some of the fallen trees and lead to false fallen tree detections. Based on the results of this study, ALS-based collection of fallen tree information should be focused on old-growth forests and mature managed forests, at least with the current operative point densities.
  • Häkkilä, Matti; Johansson, Anna; Sandgren, Terhi; Uusitalo, Anne; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Puttonen, Pasi; Savilaakso, Sini (BioMed Central, 2021)
    Abstract Background In boreal zone forest management is changing and degrading forest habitats, which has caused declines in biodiversity. To mitigate these harmful effects in production forests, small-scale habitats with high biodiversity values have been protected within them. These habitats include woodland key habitats, and other small habitat patches protected by voluntary conservation actions. In this systematic review we synthesize the evidence on the value of small protected habitat patches (SPHP) within production forest landscapes for biodiversity. Review question: Are small protected habitat patches within boreal production forests effective in conserving species richness, abundance, and community composition? Methods Both peer-reviewed and grey literature were searched from bibliographical databases, organizational websites and internet search engines in English, Finnish, Swedish and Russian. Articles were screened at two stages (title/abstract and full text) and the validity of the included studies were assessed. Screening and validity assessment were based on predetermined criteria. After data extraction, narrative and quantitative syntheses were conducted. Influences of effect modifiers were tested, and sensitivity analyses were conducted. Review findings During the searches 19,458 articles were found. After duplicate removal and title/abstract screening 336 articles remained. During full text screening 41 articles were included and 35 of them (174 studies) were included in narrative synthesis. 28 articles with 127 studies had suitable data for meta-analysis. SPHPs had significantly higher species richness compared to production forests. When compared to natural forests, there was no significant difference. Forest management in areas surrounding SPHPs did not have impact on species richness of these patches. Individual abundance was significantly higher in SPHPs compared to natural or production forests. There was significantly more dead wood in SPHPs compared to production forests, but when compared to natural forests there was no significant difference. Community composition was different between SPHPs and both production and natural forests. Conclusions The findings of this review show that small protected patches within production forests are important part of biodiversity conservation. They cannot substitute larger protected areas but supplement the protected area network. However, there were gaps both in geographical distribution of the studies as well as in the selection of target species of the studies. Therefore, generalization of the results must be done carefully.
  • Hakkila, Matti; Johansson, Anna; Sandgren, Terhi; Uusitalo, Anne; Monkkonen, Mikko; Puttonen, Pasi; Savilaakso, Sini (2021)
    Background: In boreal zone forest management is changing and degrading forest habitats, which has caused declines in biodiversity. To mitigate these harmful effects in production forests, small-scale habitats with high biodiversity values have been protected within them. These habitats include woodland key habitats, and other small habitat patches protected by voluntary conservation actions. In this systematic review we synthesize the evidence on the value of small protected habitat patches (SPHP) within production forest landscapes for biodiversity. Review question: Are small protected habitat patches within boreal production forests effective in conserving species richness, abundance, and community composition? Methods: Both peer-reviewed and grey literature were searched from bibliographical databases, organizational websites and internet search engines in English, Finnish, Swedish and Russian. Articles were screened at two stages (title/abstract and full text) and the validity of the included studies were assessed. Screening and validity assessment were based on predetermined criteria. After data extraction, narrative and quantitative syntheses were conducted. Influences of effect modifiers were tested, and sensitivity analyses were conducted. Review findings: During the searches 19,458 articles were found. After duplicate removal and title/abstract screening 336 articles remained. During full text screening 41 articles were included and 35 of them (174 studies) were included in narrative synthesis. 28 articles with 127 studies had suitable data for meta-analysis. SPHPs had significantly higher species richness compared to production forests. When compared to natural forests, there was no significant difference. Forest management in areas surrounding SPHPs did not have impact on species richness of these patches. Individual abundance was significantly higher in SPHPs compared to natural or production forests. There was significantly more dead wood in SPHPs compared to production forests, but when compared to natural forests there was no significant difference. Community composition was different between SPHPs and both production and natural forests. Conclusions: The findings of this review show that small protected patches within production forests are important part of biodiversity conservation. They cannot substitute larger protected areas but supplement the protected area network. However, there were gaps both in geographical distribution of the studies as well as in the selection of target species of the studies. Therefore, generalization of the results must be done carefully.
  • Kara, Tuomas (Helsingin yliopisto, 2015)
    Trees play an important ecological role also after their death. Earlier studies have introduced various methods of modelling coarse woody debris (CWD). However, CWD models that would consider different types of CWD, and their decay class dynamics are lacking from the Finnish commercial forests. The aim of this study was to predict the development of CWD for UPM-Kymmene owned FSC-certified forests in Finland. For that purpose, models for simulating CWD dynamics in Finnish commercial forests were developed for Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies and hardwoods. Trees were classified to different decay classes based on their visual appearance and softness of the wood. The mean residence time of each decay class was used to develop transition matrix model for predicting the possibilities of transitions between different decay classes. In the generated model a tree can stay in the class m or move to classes m+1 or m+2 in a time frame of five years. In addition snags had a possibility to fall i.e. move to down woody debris pool. The results showed that within all the studied tree species, the half-life of snags was 15–20 years. Hardwood logs decomposed faster than softwoods: the half-life of softwood logs was 35–40 years and the half-life of hardwoods was about 25 years. In a hypothetical equilibrium state reached by a continuous CWD input, most snags were in early decay class, whereas most logs were in the advanced decay class. Volume and quality of future CWD in UPM-Kymmene owned FSC-certified forests was predicted, using their current CWD pool and future tree mortality predicted by the forest simulation system MELA. In these simulations, the volume of CWD increased in the future. At the end of the 50-year simulation period, the predicted volume of CWD was 5,9 m3 ha-1. Pinus sylvesris was the dominant CWD species and advanced decayed wood was dominant decay class. The simulation approach demonstrated here has much potential as a useful decision-making tool for CWD management in commercial forests. Incorporating these models into forest management planning could provide valuable information about the effects of management practices on CWD dynamics in commercial forests.
  • Purhonen, Jenna; Ovaskainen, Otso; Halme, Panu; Komonen, Atte; Huhtinen, Seppo; Kotiranta, Heikki; Laessoe, Thomas; Abrego, Nerea (2020)
    Tree species is one of the most important determinants of wood-inhabiting fungal community composition, yet its relationship with fungal reproductive and dispersal traits remains poorly understood. We studied fungal communities (total of 657 species) inhabiting broadleaved and coniferous dead wood (total of 192 logs) in 12 semi-natural boreal forests. We utilized a trait-based hierarchical joint species distribution model to examine how the relationship between dead wood quality and species occurrence correlates with reproductive and dispersal morphological traits. Broadleaved trees had higher species richness than conifers, due to discomycetoids and pyrenomycetoids specializing in them. Resupinate and pileate species were generally specialized in coniferous dead wood. Fungi inhabiting broadleaved trees had larger and more elongated spores than fungi in conifers. Spore size was larger and spore shape more spherical in species occupying large dead wood units. These results indicate the selective effect of dead wood quality, visible not only in species diversity, but also in reproductive and dispersal traits. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd and British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.
  • Korhonen, Aku; Penttilä, Reijo; Siitonen, Juha; Miettinen, Otto; Immonen, Auli; Hamberg, Leena (2021)
    Urban forests are often remnants of former larger forested areas, and traditionally considered as degraded habitats due to negative effects of urbanization. However, recent studies have shown that urban forests managed for recreational purposes can be structurally close to natural forests and may provide habitat features, such as dead wood, that are scarce in intensively managed forest landscapes. In this study, we assessed how urbanization affects polypore species richness and the number of red-listed polypore species in forest stands, and the occurrences of polypore species on individual units of dead wood. Spruce-inhabiting polypore assemblages and their associations to urbanization, local habitat connectivity and dead-wood abundance were investigated in southern Finland. The effects of urbanization on polypore species richness and individual species were largely negligible when other environmental variability was accounted for. Several red-listed polypore species were found in deadwood hotspots of urban forests, though urbanization had a marginally significant negative effect on their richness. The main driver of total species richness was dead-wood abundance while the number of red-listed species was also strongly dependent on local habitat connectivity, implying that a high degree of fragmentation can decrease their occurrence in urban forests. We conclude that the highest potential for providing habitats for threatened species in the urban context lies in large peri-urban recreational forests which have been preserved for recreational purposes around many cities. On the other hand, overall polypore diversity can be increased simply by increasing dead-wood abundance, irrespective of landscape context.