Browsing by Subject "Developmental dyslexia"

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  • Ueda, Riyo; Kaga, Yoshimi; Kita, Yosuke; Nakagawa, Eiji; Okada, Takashi; Inagaki, Masumi (2021)
    Background Poor reading ability is one of the common causes of low academic performance. In previous studies, children with dyslexia were found to demonstrate poor academic achievement due to poor reading ability. However, the relationship between academic achievement and reading ability in children with a borderline full-scale intellectual quotient (FSIQ) is unknown. This study aimed to clarify the clinical characteristics of children with borderline FSIQ and poor reading ability, and differentiate these characteristics from those of children with higher FSIQ and poor reading ability. Methods A total of 126 children (aged 6-15 years) identified as having low academic performance were enrolled. The reading ability of children was assessed through their performance on the hiragana (Japanese syllabary) reading task, while their reading and writing achievement was assessed through their reading and writing score on the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition. Children were categorized into two groups based on their FSIQ score (FSIQ > 85 and 85 >= FSIQ >= 70). Reading ability in children was evaluated by referring to the linear relationship between FSIQ and the standard deviation value of reading tasks in typically developing children. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to examine clinical characteristics between higher and lower FSIQ groups. Associations between reading and writing achievement, reading ability, and ages of children were assessed using Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients for the higher and lower FSIQ groups. Results Poorer reading and writing achievement was associated with poorer reading ability in the higher FSIQ group. Conversely, poorer reading and writing achievement and poor reading ability were associated with older age in the lower FSIQ group. Conclusions Poor reading and writing achievement were associated with older age, not with poor reading ability in the lower FSIQ group. Children with lower FSIQ need appropriate educational interventions based on independent assessments to further their academic achievement and reading ability. Moreover, they need more frequent evaluations of their academic achievement than do children with higher FSIQ and poor reading ability since they are more likely to be at a lower academic achievement level at an older age.
  • Bieder, Andrea; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Matsson, Hans; Nilsson, Harriet E.; Eisfeldt, Jesper; Dragomir, Anca; Paucar, Martin; Granberg, Tobias; Li, Tie-Qiang; Lindstrand, Anna; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Paez, Isabel (2020)
    Background Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a neurodevelopmental learning disorder with high heritability. A number of candidate susceptibility genes have been identified, some of which are linked to the function of the cilium, an organelle regulating left-right asymmetry development in the embryo. Furthermore, it has been suggested that disrupted left-right asymmetry of the brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as DD. However, it is unknown whether there is a common genetic cause to DD and laterality defects or ciliopathies. Case presentation Here, we studied two individuals with co-occurring situs inversus (SI) and DD using whole genome sequencing to identify genetic variants of importance for DD and SI. Individual 1 had primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a rare, autosomal recessive disorder with oto-sino-pulmonary phenotype and SI. We identified two rare nonsynonymous variants in the dynein axonemal heavy chain 5 gene (DNAH5): a previously reported variant c.7502G > C; p.(R2501P), and a novel variant c.12043 T > G; p.(Y4015D). Both variants are predicted to be damaging. Ultrastructural analysis of the cilia revealed a lack of outer dynein arms and normal inner dynein arms. MRI of the brain revealed no significant abnormalities. Individual 2 had non-syndromic SI and DD. In individual 2, one rare variant (c.9110A > G;p.(H3037R)) in the dynein axonemal heavy chain 11 gene (DNAH11), coding for another component of the outer dynein arm, was identified. Conclusions We identified the likely genetic cause of SI and PCD in one individual, and a possibly significant heterozygosity in the other, both involving dynein genes. Given the present evidence, it is unclear if the identified variants also predispose to DD and further studies into the association between laterality, ciliopathies and DD are needed.
  • Bieder, Andrea; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Matsson, Hans; Nilsson, Harriet E; Eisfeldt, Jesper; Dragomir, Anca; Paucar, Martin; Granberg, Tobias; Li, Tie-Qiang; Lindstrand, Anna; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel (BioMed Central, 2020)
    Abstract Background Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a neurodevelopmental learning disorder with high heritability. A number of candidate susceptibility genes have been identified, some of which are linked to the function of the cilium, an organelle regulating left-right asymmetry development in the embryo. Furthermore, it has been suggested that disrupted left-right asymmetry of the brain may play a role in neurodevelopmental disorders such as DD. However, it is unknown whether there is a common genetic cause to DD and laterality defects or ciliopathies. Case presentation Here, we studied two individuals with co-occurring situs inversus (SI) and DD using whole genome sequencing to identify genetic variants of importance for DD and SI. Individual 1 had primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a rare, autosomal recessive disorder with oto-sino-pulmonary phenotype and SI. We identified two rare nonsynonymous variants in the dynein axonemal heavy chain 5 gene (DNAH5): a previously reported variant c.7502G > C; p.(R2501P), and a novel variant c.12043 T > G; p.(Y4015D). Both variants are predicted to be damaging. Ultrastructural analysis of the cilia revealed a lack of outer dynein arms and normal inner dynein arms. MRI of the brain revealed no significant abnormalities. Individual 2 had non-syndromic SI and DD. In individual 2, one rare variant (c.9110A > G;p.(H3037R)) in the dynein axonemal heavy chain 11 gene (DNAH11), coding for another component of the outer dynein arm, was identified. Conclusions We identified the likely genetic cause of SI and PCD in one individual, and a possibly significant heterozygosity in the other, both involving dynein genes. Given the present evidence, it is unclear if the identified variants also predispose to DD and further studies into the association between laterality, ciliopathies and DD are needed.