Browsing by Subject "ELDERLY PERSONS"

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  • Perttilä, Niko M.; Öhman, Hanna; Strandberg, Timo E.; Kautiainen, Hannu; Raivio, Minna; Laakkonen, Marja-Liisa; Savikko, Niina; Tilvis, Reijo S.; Pitkälä, Kaisu H. (2018)
    Introduction No study has investigated how exercise modifies the effect of fall-related drugs (FRDs) on falls among people with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Objective The aim of this study was to investigate how exercise intervention and FRDs interact with fall risk among patients with AD. Methods In the FINALEX trial, community-dwelling persons with AD received either home-based or group-based exercise twice weekly for 1 year (n = 129); the control group received normal care (n = 65). The number of falls was based on spouses' fall diaries. We examined the incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for falls among both non-users and users of various FRDs (antihypertensives, psychotropics, drugs with anticholinergic properties [DAPs]) in both control and combined intervention groups. Results Between the intervention and control groups, there was no difference in the number of falls among those without antihypertensives or psychotropics. In the intervention group taking antihypertensives, the IRR was 0.5 falls/person-year (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4-0.6), while in the control group, the IRR was 1.5 falls/person-year (95% CI 1.2-1.8) [p <0.001 for group, p = 0.067 for medication, p <0.001 for interaction]. Among patients using psychotropics, the intervention group had an IRR of 0.7 falls/person-year (95% CI 0.6-0.9), while the control group had an IRR of 2.0 falls/person-year (95% CI 1.6-2.5) [p <0.001 for group, p = 0.071 for medication, p <0.001 for interaction]. There was a significant difference in falls between the intervention and control groups not using DAPs (0.6, 95% CI 0.5-0.7; 1.2, 95% CI 1.0-1.4), and between the intervention and control groups using DAPs (1.1, 95% CI 0.8-1.3; 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.1) [p <0.001 for group, p = 0.014 for medication, p = 0.97 for interaction]. Conclusion Exercise has the potential to decrease the risk for falls among people with AD using antihypertensives and psychotropics.
  • Borges, Alvaro H.; O'Connor, Jemma L.; Phillips, Andrew N.; Baker, Jason V.; Vjecha, Michael J.; Losso, Marcelo H.; Klinker, Hartwig; Lopardo, Gustavo; Williams, Ian; Lundgren, Jens D.; INSIGHT SMART Study Grp; ESPRIT Study Grp; SILCAAT Sci Comm; Ristola, Matti A (2014)
  • Iso-Markku, Paula; Waller, Katja; Kujala, Urho M.; Kaprio, Jaakko (2015)
    Introduction. Physical activity is associated with a decreased occurrence of dementia. In twins, we investigated the effect of persistent physical activity in adulthood on mortality due to dementia. Materials and methods. Physical activity was queried in 1975 and 1981 from the members of the older Finnish Twin Cohort (n = 2 1,791), who were aged 24-60 years at the end of 1981. The subjects were divided into three categories according to the persistence of their vigorous physical activity. Dementia deaths were followed up to the end of 2011. Results. During the 29-year follow-up, 353 subjects died of dementia. In individual-based analyses the age-and sex-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.65 (95% CI 0.43-0.98) for subjects partaking in vigorous physical activities in both 1975 and 1981 compared to those who were inactive in both years. No significant change was observed after adjusting for potential confounding factors. The corresponding HR for within-pair comparisons of the less active twin versus the more active co-twin was 0.48 (95% CI 0.17-1.32). The results for analyses of the volume of physical activity were inconclusive. Conclusions. Persistent vigorous leisure-time physical activity protects from dementia, and the effect appears to remain after taking into account childhood environment.
  • Kontio, Tea; Heliovaara, Markku; Rissanen, Harri; Knekt, Paul; Aromaa, Arpo; Solovieva, Svetlana (2017)
    Background: Meniscal lesions are among the most common injuries of the knee, yet limited epidemiologic data is available on their risk factors. We investigated the association of lifestyle factors and physical strenuousness of work on knee injuries with a focus on meniscal lesions. Methods: We examined a nationally representative sample of persons aged 30 to 59 years, who participated in a comprehensive health examination (the Mini-Finland Health Survey). Subjects without any injury or osteoarthritis in the knee joint at baseline (n = 4713) were subsequently followed via the National Hospital Discharge Register up to 30 years. Results: During the follow-up, 338 knee injuries were identified of which 224 were meniscal lesions. Obesity and regular leisure time physical exercise were associated with an increased risk of first hospitalization due to meniscal lesions (hazard ratio (HR) 1.62 and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-2.48 and 1.53, 95% CI 1.05-2.23, respectively). The types of sports predicting the highest risk of meniscal lesions were ballgames, gymnastics and jogging. Physical strenuousness of work did not predict meniscal lesion. The hazard of other knee injury was increased among those reporting irregular or regular physical exercise at baseline (HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.03-2.64 and 1.88 CI 1.05-2.36, respectively). Smoking or alcohol intake were not associated with knee injuries. Conclusions: Better safety measures in high-risk sports and weight control would likely improve the prevention of meniscal lesions in populations.