Browsing by Subject "ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH-FACTOR"

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  • Schnitzbauer, Andreas A.; Zuelke, Carl; Graeb, Christian; Rochon, Justine; Bilbao, Itxarone; Burra, Patrizia; de Jong, Koert P.; Duvoux, Christophe; Kneteman, Norman M.; Adam, Rene; Bechstein, Wolf O.; Becker, Thomas; Beckebaum, Susanne; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Cillo, Umberto; Colledan, Michele; Faendrich, Fred; Gugenheim, Jean; Hauss, Johann P.; Heise, Michael; Hidalgo, Ernest; Jamieson, Neville; Koenigsrainer, Alfred; Lamby, Philipp E.; Lerut, Jan P.; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Margreiter, Raimund; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Mutzbauer, Ingrid; Otto, Gerd; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe; Pinna, Antonio D.; Pirenne, Jacques; Rizell, Magnus; Rossi, Giorgio; Rostaing, Lionel; Roy, Andre; Sanchez Turrion, Victor; Schmidt, Jan; Troisi, Roberto I.; van Hoek, Bart; Valente, Umberto; Wolf, Philippe; Wolters, Heiner; Mirza, Darius F.; Scholz, Tim; Steininger, Rudolf; Soderdahl, Gunnar; Strasser, Simone I.; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Neuhaus, Peter; Schlitt, Hans J.; Geissler, Edward K. (2010)
  • Kleino, Iivari; Ortiz, Rebekka M.; Huovila, Ari-Pekka J. (2007)
    Background: ADAM15 is a metalloprotease-disintegrin implicated in ectodomain shedding and cell adhesion. Aberrant ADAM15 expression has been associated with human cancer and other disorders. We have previously shown that the alternative splicing of ADAM15 transcripts is mis-regulated in cancer cells. To gain a better understanding of ADAM15 regulation, its genomic organization and regulatory elements as well as the alternative exon use in human tissues were characterized. Results: Human ADAM15, flanked by the FLJ32785/DCST1 and ephrin-A4 genes, spans 11.4 kb from the translation initiation codon to the polyadenylation signal, being the shortest multiple-exon ADAM gene. The gene contains 23 exons varying from 63 to 316 bp and 22 introns from 79 to 1283 bp. The gene appeared to have several transcription start sites and their location suggested the promoter location within a CpG island proximal to the translation start. Reporter expression experiments confirmed the location of functional GC-rich, TATAless and CAATless promoter, with the most critical transcription-supporting elements located - 266 to - 23 bp relative to the translation start. Normal human tissues showed different complex patterns of at least 13 different ADAM15 splice variants arising from the alternative use of the cytosolic-encoding exons 19, 20a/b, and 21a/b. The deduced ADAM15 protein isoforms have different combinations of cytosolic regulatory protein interaction motifs. Conclusion: Characterization of human ADAM15 gene and identification of elements involved in the regulation of transcription and alternative splicing provide important clues for elucidation of physiological and pathological roles of ADAM15. The present results also show that the alternative exon use is a physiological post-transcriptional mechanism regulating ADAM15 expression in human tissues.
  • Licht, Tamar; Kreisel, Tirzah; Biala, Yoav; Mohan, Sandesh; Yaari, Yoel; Anisimov, Andrey; Alitalo, Kari; Keshet, Eli (2020)
    Multiple insults to the brain lead to neuronal cell death, thus raising the question to what extent can lost neurons be replenished by adult neurogenesis. Here we focused on the hippocampus and especially the dentate gyrus (DG), a vulnerable brain region and one of the two sites where adult neuronal stem cells (NSCs) reside. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis was extensively studied with regard to its contribution to cognitive enhancement, we focused on their underestimated capability to repair a massively injured, nonfunctional DG. To address this issue, we inflicted substantial DG-specific damage in mice of either sex either by diphtheria toxin-based ablation of >50% of mature DG granule cells (GCs) or by prolonged brain-specific VEGF overexpression culminating in extensive, highly selective loss of DG GCs (thereby also reinforcing the notion of selective DG vulnerability). The neurogenic system promoted effective regeneration by increasing NSCs proliferation/survival rates, restoring a nearly original DG mass, promoting proper rewiring of regenerated neurons to their afferent and efferent partners, and regaining of lost spatial memory. Notably, concomitantly with the natural age-related decline in the levels of neurogenesis, the regenerative capacity of the hippocampus also subsided with age. The study thus revealed an unappreciated regenerative potential of the young DG and suggests hippocampal NSCs as a critical reservoir enabling recovery from catastrophic DG damage.
  • Penttila, Patrick; Rautiola, Juhana; Poussa, Tuija; Peltola, Katriina; Bono, Petri (2017)
    Previous preclinical research suggests that angiotensin system inhibitors may have a direct anti-angiogenic effect that may be synergistic with the currently available angiogenesis inhibitors. In this retrospective study, we reviewed 303 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with first-line angiogenesis inhibitors. Our results demonstrate a longer overall and progression-free survival for angiotensin system inhibitor users among patients with treatment-related hypertension. If validated, these results may guide the choice of antihypertensive medication among patients being treated with angiogenesis inhibitors. Background: Research suggests that baseline use of angiotensin system inhibitors (ASIs) improves outcome in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), but it remains unknown whether the type of antihypertensive medication used to initiate management at onset of treatment-induced hypertension (HTN) is associated with outcome. We evaluated the association of ASIs and outcome among patients with mRCC treated with first-line tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Patients and Methods: We identified 303 consecutive patients with mRCC who were treated with sunitinib or pazopanib in a single university hospital cancer center. Statistical analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression adjusted for known risk factors. Results: Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were similar among patients with baseline HTN (n = 197; 65%) versus patients with no baseline HTN (n = 106; 35%) (PFS; P = .72) (OS; P = .54). There was a significant difference between patients with treatment-induced HTN (n = 110) versus patients with no treatment-induced HTN (n = 193) for PFS (15.6 vs. 6.4 months, respectively; P <.001) and OS (34.9 vs. 13.9 months, respectively; P <.001). Use of ASIs at baseline (n = 126; 41.6%) had no impact on outcome as compared with patients receiving other antihypertensive medication (n = 71; 23.4%) or with patients with no baseline antihypertensive medication (n = 106; 35.0%). Among patients with TKI-induced HTN (n = 110), however, ASI users (n = 91) demonstrated improved OS (37.5 vs. 18.1 months; P = .001) and PFS (17.1 vs. 7.2 months; P = .004) versus ASI nonusers (n = 19), respectively. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate survival benefit for ASI users among patients with TKI-induced HTN. These results, however, require further validation in a prospective setting. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Chandola, Chetan; Kalme, Sheetal; Casteleijn, Marco G.; Urtti, Arto; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy (2016)
    Aptamers are small, single-stranded oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) that bind to their target with high specificity and affinity. Although aptamers are analogous to antibodies for a wide range of target recognition and variety of applications, they have significant advantages over antibodies. Since aptamers have recently emerged as a class of biomolecules with an application in a wide array of fields, we need to summarize the latest developments herein. In this review we will discuss about the latest developments in using aptamers in diagnostics, drug delivery and imaging. We begin with diagnostics, discussing the application of aptamers for the detection of infective agents itself, antigens/toxins (bacteria), biomarkers (cancer), or a combination. The ease of conjugation and labelling of aptamers makes them a potential tool for diagnostics. Also, due to the reduced off-target effects of aptamers, their use as a potential drug delivery tool is emerging rapidly. Hence, we discuss their use in targeted delivery in conjugation with siRNAs, nanoparticles, liposomes, drugs and antibodies. Finally, we discuss about the conjugation strategies applicable for RNA and DNA aptamers for imaging. Their stability and self-assembly after heating makes them superior over protein-based binding molecules in terms of labelling and conjugation strategies.
  • FinnDiane Study; Vuori, Nadja; Sandholm, Niina; Kumar, Anmol; Hietala, Kustaa; Syreeni, Anna; Forsblom, Carol; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Skottman, Heli; Imamura, Minako; Maeda, Shiro; Summanen, Paula A.; Lehto, Markku; Groop, Per-Henrik (2019)
    Diabetic retinopathy is a common diabetes complication that threatens the eyesight and may eventually lead to acquired visual impairment or blindness. While a substantial heritability has been reported for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), only a few genetic risk factors have been identified. Using genome-wide sib pair linkage analysis including 361 individuals with type 1 diabetes, we found suggestive evidence of linkage with PDR at chromosome 10p12 overlapping the CACNB2 gene (logarithm of odds = 2.73). Evidence of association between variants in CACNB2 and PDR was also found in association analysis of 4,005 individuals with type 1 diabetes with an odds ratio of 0.83 and P value of 8.6 x 10(-4) for rs11014284. Sequencing of CACNB2 revealed two coding variants, R476C/rs202152674 and S502L/rs137886839. CACNB2 is abundantly expressed in retinal cells and encodes the beta 2 subunit of the L-type calcium channel. Blocking vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by intravitreous anti-VEGF injections is a promising clinical therapy to treat PDR. Our data show that L-type calcium channels regulate VEGF expression and secretion from retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE19) and support the role of CACNB2 via regulation of VEGF in the pathogenesis of PDR. However, further genetic and functional studies are necessary to consolidate the findings.
  • Strippoli, Raffaele; Loureiro, Jesus; Moreno, Vanessa; Benedicto, Ignacio; Perez Lozano, Maria Luisa; Barreiro, Olga; Pellinen, Teijo; Minguet, Susana; Foronda, Miguel; Teresa Osteso, Maria; Calvo, Enrique; Vazquez, Jesus; Lopez Cabrera, Manuel; Angel del Pozo, Miguel (2015)
  • Farkkila, Anniina; Zauli, Giorgio; Haltia, Ulla-Maija; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Unkila-Kallio, Leila; Secchiero, Paola; Heikinheimo, Markku (2016)
    Targeted treatments are needed for advanced adult-type granulosa cell tumors (AGCTs). We set out to assess tumor tissue and circulating levels of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a promising anti-cancer cytokine, in patients affected by AGCT. We analyzed tissue expression of TRAIL in 127 AGCTs using immunohistochemistry or RT-PCR. Soluble TRAIL was measured by means of ELISA from 141 AGCT patient serum samples, as well as the conditioned media of 15 AGCT patient-derived primary cell cultures, and the KGN cell line. Tissue and serum TRAIL levels were analyzed in relationship with clinical parameters, and serum estradiol, FSH, and LH levels. We found that AGCT samples expressed TRAIL mRNA and protein at levels comparable to normal granulosa cells. AGCT cells did not release soluble TRAIL. TRAIL protein levels were decreased in tumors over 10 cm in diameter (p = 0.04). Consistently, circulating TRAIL levels correlated negatively to tumor dimension (p = 0.01). Circulating TRAIL levels negatively associated with serum estradiol levels. In multiple regression analysis, tumor size was an independent factor contributing to the decreased levels of soluble TRAIL in AGCT patients. AGCTs associate with significantly decreased tumor tissue and serum TRAIL levels in patients with a large tumor mass. These findings encourage further study of agonistic TRAIL treatments in patients with advanced or recurrent AGCT.
  • Tannir, Nizar M.; Powles, Thomas; Escudier, Bernard; Donskov, Frede; Gruenwald, Viktor; Sternberg, Cora N.; Schmidinger, Manuela; Schoeffski, Patrick; Szczylik, Cezary; Peltola, Katriina; Nosov, Dmitry; Melichar, Bohuslav; Clary, Douglas; Scheffold, Christian; Motzer, Robert J.; Choueiri, Toni K. (2020)
    Background: We investigated outcomes with cabozantinib versus everolimus in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with or without prior nephrectomy in the phase 3 METEOR trial (NCT01865747). Methods: Patients (N = 658) with advanced clear cell RCC and prior treatment with >= 1 VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) were randomized to cabozantinib 60 mg/day or everolimus 10 mg/day. Pre-specified subgroup analyses of progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and objective response rate (ORR) were conducted by prior nephrectomy status. Response was assessed by independent radiology committee. Results: Most enrolled patients (85%) had prior nephrectomy. Baseline prognostic factors (e.g. MSKCC risk group) were less favorable for patients without prior nephrectomy. Cabozantinib improved outcomes versus everolimus in the subgroups with and without nephrectomy-hazard ratios (95% CIs) of 0.51 (0.41-0.64) and 0.51 (0.30-0.86), respectively, for PFS, and 0.66 (0.52-0.84) and 0.75 (0.44-1.27), respectively, for OS. Median OS was numerically longer in patients with versus those without prior nephrectomy in both treatment arms. ORR for cabozantinib versus everolimus was 17% versus 4% for the prior nephrectomy subgroup and 21% versus 2% for the subgroup without prior nephrectomy. Among evaluable patients without prior nephrectomy, reductions of renal target lesions occurred in 94% (16/17) of patients in the cabozantinib arm versus 44% (8/18) in the everolimus arm. The safety profiles of both subgroups were generally consistent with that of the overall study population. Conclusion: Cabozantinib improved PFS, ORR, and OS compared with everolimus in patients with advanced RCC irrespective of nephrectomy status.
  • Vilander, Laura M.; Vaara, Suvi T.; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Pettilä, Ville; FINNAKI Study Grp; Laru-Sompa, Raili; Pulkkinen, Anni; Saarelainen, Minna; Reilama, Mikko; Tolmunen, Sinikka; Rantalainen, Ulla; Miettinen, Marja; Suvela, Markku; Pesola, Katrine; Saastamoinen, Pekka; Kauppinen, Sirpa; Kaukonen, Kirsi-Maija; Korhonen, Anna-Maija; Nisula, Sara; Vaara, Suvi; Suojaranta-Ylinen, Raili; Mildh, Leena; Haapio, Mikko; Nurminen, Laura; Sutinen, Sari; Pettilä, Leena; Laitinen, Helinä; Syrja, Heidi; Henttonen, Kirsi; Lappi, Elina; Boman, Hillevi; Varpula, Tero; Porkka, Päivi; Sivula, Mirka; Rahkonen, Mira; Tsurkka, Anne; Prittinen, Niina; Alaspaa, Ari; Salanto, Ville; Juntunen, Hanna; Sanisalo, Teija; Parviainen, Ilkka; Uusaro, Ari; Ruokonen, Esko; Bendel, Stepani; Rissanen, Niina; Lång, Maarit; Rahikainen, Sari; Rissanen, Saija; Ahonen, Merja; Halonen, Elina; Vaskelainen, Eija; Poukkanen, Meri; Lintula, Esa; Suominen, Sirpa; Heikkinen, Jorma; Lavander, Timo; Heinonen, Kirsi; Juopperi, Anne-Mari; Kaminski, Tadeusz; Gäddnäs, Fiia; Kuusela, Tuija; Roiko, Jane; Karlsson, Sari; Reinikainen, Matti; Surakka, Tero; Jyrkönen, Helena; Eiserbeck, Tanja; Kallinen, Jaana; Lund, Vesa; Tuominen, Päivi; Perkola, Pauliina; Tuominen, Riikka; Hietaranta, Marika; Johansson, Satu; Hovilehto, Seppo; Kirsi, Anne; Tiainen, Pekka; Myllärinen, Tuija; Leino, Pirjo; Toropainen, Anne; Kuitunen, Anne; Leppänen, Ilona; Levoranta, Markus; Hoppu, Sanna; Sauranen, Jukka; Tenhunen, Jyrki; Kukkurainen, Atte; Kortelainen, Samuli; Varila, Simo; Inkinen, Outi; Koivuviita, Niina; Kotamäki, Jutta; Laine, Anu; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Laurila, Jouko J.; Sälkiö, Sinikka; Koivisto, Simo-Pekka; Hautamäki, Raku; Skinnar, Maria (2019)
    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a syndrome with high incidence among the critically ill. Because the clinical variables and currently used biomarkers have failed to predict the individual susceptibility to AKI, candidate gene variants for the trait have been studied. Studies about genetic predisposition to AKI have been mainly underpowered and of moderate quality. We report the association study of 27 genetic variants in a cohort of Finnish critically ill patients, focusing on the replication of associations detected with variants in genes related to inflammation, cell survival, or circulation. In this prospective, observational Finnish Acute Kidney Injury (FINNAKI) study, 2647 patients without chronic kidney disease were genotyped. We defined AKI according to Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. We compared severe AKI (Stages 2 and 3, n = 625) to controls (Stage 0, n = 1582). For genotyping we used iPLEX(TM) Assay (Agena Bioscience). We performed the association analyses with PLINK software, using an additive genetic model in logistic regression. Despite the numerous, although contradictory, studies about association between polymorphisms rs1800629 in TNFA and rs1800896 in IL10 and AKI, we found no association (odds ratios 1.06 (95% CI 0.89-1.28, p = 0.51) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.80-1.05, p = 0.20), respectively). Adjusting for confounders did not change the results. To conclude, we could not confirm the associations reported in previous studies in a cohort of critically ill patients.
  • Goossens, E.; Jahnukainen, K.; Mitchell, R. T.; van Pelt, A. M. M.; Pennings, G.; Rives, N.; Poels, J.; Wyns, C.; Lane, S.; Rodriguez-Wallberg, K. A.; Rives, A.; Valli-Pulaski, H.; Steimer, S.; Kliesch, S.; Braye, A.; Andres, M. M.; Medrano, J.; Ramos, L.; Kristensen, S. G.; Andersen, C. Y.; Bjarnason, R.; Orwig, K. E.; Neuhaus, N.; Stukenborg, J. B. (2020)
    BACKGROUND: Infertility is an important side effect of treatments used for cancer and other non-malignant conditions in males. This may be due to the loss of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and/or altered functionality of testicular somatic cells (e.g. Sertoli cells, Leydig cells). Whereas sperm cryopreservation is the first-line procedure to preserve fertility in post-pubertal males, this option does not exist for prepubertal boys. For patients unable to produce sperm and at high risk of losing their fertility, testicular tissue freezing is now proposed as an alternative experimental option to safeguard their fertility. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: With this review, we aim to provide an update on clinical practices and experimental methods, as well as to describe patient management inclusion strategies used to preserve and restore the fertility of prepubertal boys at high risk of fertility loss. SEARCH METHODS: Based on the expertise of the participating centres and a literature search of the progress in clinical practices, patient management strategies and experimental methods used to preserve and restore the fertility of prepubertal boys at high risk of fertility loss were identified. In addition, a survey was conducted amongst European and North American centres/networks that have published papers on their testicular tissue banking activity. OUTCOMES: Since the first publication on murine SSC transplantation in 1994, remarkable progress has been made towards clinical application: cryopreservation protocols for testicular tissue have been developed in animal models and are now offered to patients in clinics as a still experimental procedure. Transplantation methods have been adapted for human testis, and the efficiency and safety of the technique are being evaluated in mouse and primate models. However, important practical, medical and ethical issues must be resolved before fertility restoration can be applied in the clinic. Since the previous survey conducted in 2012, the implementation of testicular tissue cryopreservation as a means to preserve the fertility of prepubertal boys has increased. Data have been collected from 24 co-ordinating centres worldwide, which are actively offering testis tissue cryobanking to safeguard the future fertility of boys. More than 1033 young patients (age range 3 months to 18 years) have already undergone testicular tissue retrieval and storage for fertility preservation. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION: The review does not include the data of all reproductive centres worldwide. Other centres might be offering testicular tissue cryopreservation. Therefore, the numbers might be not representative for the entire field in reproductive medicine and biology worldwide. The key ethical issue regarding fertility preservation in prepubertal boys remains the experimental nature of the intervention. WIDER IMPLICATIONS: The revised procedures can be implemented by the multi-disciplinary teams offering and/or developing treatment strategies to preserve the fertility of prepubertal boys who have a high risk of fertility loss.
  • Johns, Scott C.; Yin, Xin; Jeltsch, Michael; Bishop, Joseph R.; Schuksz, Manuela; El Ghazal, Roland; Wilcox-Adelman, Sarah A.; Alitalo, Kari; Fuster, Mark M. (2016)
    Rationale: Lymphatic vessel growth is mediated by major prolymphangiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-C) and VEGF-D, among other endothelial effectors. Heparan sulfate is a linear polysaccharide expressed on proteoglycan core proteins on cell membranes and matrix, playing roles in angiogenesis, although little is known about any function(s) in lymphatic remodeling in vivo. Objective: To explore the genetic basis and mechanisms, whereby heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate pathological lymphatic remodeling. Methods and Results: Lymphatic endothelial deficiency in the major heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1; involved in glycan-chain sulfation) was associated with reduced lymphangiogenesis in pathological models, including spontaneous neoplasia. Mouse mutants demonstrated tumor-associated lymphatic vessels with apoptotic nuclei. Mutant lymphatic endothelia demonstrated impaired mitogen (Erk) and survival (Akt) pathway signaling and reduced VEGF-C-mediated protection from starvation-induced apoptosis. Lymphatic endothelial-specific Ndst1 deficiency (in Ndst1(f/f)Prox1(+/CreERT2) mice) was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-C-dependent lymphangiogenesis. Lymphatic heparan sulfate deficiency reduced phosphorylation of the major lymphatic growth receptor VEGF receptor-3 in response to multiple VEGF-C species. Syndecan-4 was the dominantly expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycan in mouse lymphatic endothelia, and pathological lymphangiogenesis was impaired in Sdc4((-/-)) mice. On the lymphatic cell surface, VEGF-C induced robust association between syndecan-4 and VEGF receptor-3, which was sensitive to glycan disruption. Moreover, VEGF receptor-3 mitogen and survival signaling was reduced in the setting of Ndst1 or Sdc4 deficiency. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate the genetic importance of heparan sulfate and the major lymphatic proteoglycan syndecan-4 in pathological lymphatic remodeling. This may introduce novel future strategies to alter pathological lymphatic-vascular remodeling.
  • Ilochonwu, Blessing C.; Urtti, Arto; Hennink, Wim E.; Vermonden, Tina (2020)
    This review highlights how hydrogel formulations can improve intravitreal protein delivery to the posterior segment of the eye in order to increase therapeutic outcome and patient compliance. Several therapeutic proteins have shown excellent clinical successes for the treatment of various intraocular diseases. However, drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye faces significant challenges due to multiple physiological barriers preventing drugs from reaching the retina, among which intravitreal protein instability and rapid clearance from the site of injection. Hence, frequent injections are required to maintain therapeutic levels. Moreover, because the world population ages, the number of patients suffering from ocular diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) is increasing and causing increased health care costs. Therefore, there is a growing need for suitable delivery systems able to tackle the current limitations in retinal protein delivery, which also may reduce costs. Hydrogels have shown to be promising delivery systems capable of sustaining release of therapeutic proteins and thus extending their local presence. Here, an extensive overview of preclinically developed intravitreal hydrogels is provided with attention to the rational design of clinically useful intravitreal systems. The currently used polymers, crosslinking mechanisms, in vitro/in vivo models and advancements are discussed together with the limitations and future perspective of these biomaterials.
  • Leopold, Anna; Verkhusha, Vladislav V. (2020)
    Inhibition of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) by small molecule inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies is used to treat cancer. Conversely, activation of RTKs with their ligands, including growth factors and insulin, is used to treat diabetes and neurodegeneration. However, conventional therapies that rely on injection of RTK inhibitors or activators do not provide spatiotemporal control over RTK signaling, which results in diminished efficiency and side effects. Recently, a number of optogenetic and optochemical approaches have been developed that allow RTK inhibition or activation in cells andin vivowith light. Light irradiation can control RTK signaling non-invasively, in a dosed manner, with high spatio-temporal precision, and without the side effects of conventional treatments. Here we provide an update on the current state of the art of optogenetic and optochemical RTK technologies and the prospects of their use in translational studies and therapy.
  • Gucciardo, Erika; Loukovaara, Sirpa; Salven, Petri; Lehti, Kaisa (2018)
    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the most common diabetic microvascular complication and major cause of blindness in working-age adults. According to the level of microvascular degeneration and ischemic damage, DR is classified into non-proliferative DR (NPDR), and end-stage, proliferative DR (PDR). Despite advances in the disease etiology and pathogenesis, molecular understanding of end-stage PDR, characterized by ischemia- and inflammation-associated neovascularization and fibrosis, remains incomplete due to the limited availability of ideal clinical samples and experimental research models. Since a great portion of patients do not benefit from current treatments, improved therapies are essential. DR is known to be a complex and multifactorial disease featuring the interplay of microvascular, neurodegenerative, metabolic, genetic/epigenetic, immunological, and inflammation-related factors. Particularly, deeper knowledge on the mechanisms and pathophysiology of most advanced PDR is critical. Lymphatic-like vessel formation coupled with abnormal endothelial differentiation and progenitor cell involvement in the neovascularization associated with PDR are novel recent findings which hold potential for improved DR treatment. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of PDR pathogenesis is therefore crucial. To this goal, multidisciplinary approaches and new ex vivo models have been developed for a more comprehensive molecular, cellular and tissue-level understanding of the disease. This is the first step to gain the needed information on how PDR can be better evaluated, stratified, and treated.
  • Ilinca, Andreea; Englund, Elisabet; Samuelsson, Sofie; Truve, Katarina; Kafantari, Efthymia; Martinez-Majander, Nicolas; Putaala, Jukka; Hakansson, Claes; Lindgren, Arne G.; Puschmann, Andreas (2021)
    Objective To describe a possible novel genetic mechanism for cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) and stroke. Methods We studied a Swedish kindred with ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage, tremor, dysautonomia, and mild cognitive decline. Members were examined clinically, radiologically, and by histopathology. Genetic workup included whole-exome sequencing (WES) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS) and intrafamilial cosegregation analyses. Results Fifteen family members were examined clinically. Twelve affected individuals had white matter hyperintensities and 1 or more of (1) stroke episodes, (2) clinically silent lacunar ischemic lesions, and (3) cognitive dysfunction. All affected individuals had tremor and/or atactic gait disturbance. Mild symmetric basal ganglia calcifications were seen in 3 affected members. Postmortem examination of 1 affected member showed pathologic alterations in both small and large arteries the brain. Skin biopsies of 3 affected members showed extracellular amorphous deposits within the subepidermal zone, which may represent degenerated arterioles. WES or WGS did not reveal any potentially disease-causing variants in known genes for cSVDs or idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, but identified 1 heterozygous variant, NM_004672.4 MAP3K6 c.322G>A p.(Asp108Asn), that cosegregated with the disease in this large family. MAP3K6 has known functions in angiogenesis and affects vascular endothelial growth factor expression, which may be implicated in cerebrovascular disease. Conclusions Our data strongly suggest the MAP3K6 variant to be causative for this novel disease phenotype, but the absence of functional data and the present lack of additional families with this disease and MAP3K6 mutations still limit the formal evidence for the variant's pathogenicity.
  • Khatun, Masuma; Sorjamaa, Anna; Kangasniemi, Marika; Sutinen, Meeri; Saio, Tuuia; Liakka, Annikki; Lehenkari, Petri; Tapanainen, Juha S.; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Chen, Joseph C.; Lehtonen, Siri; Piltonen, Terhi T. (2017)
    Objective Intrinsic inflammatory characteristics play a pivotal role in stem cell recruitment and homing through migration where the subsequent change in niche has been shown to alter these characteristics. The bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (bmMSCs) have been demonstrated to migrate to the endometrium contributing to the stem cell reservoir and regeneration of endometrial tissue. Thus, the aim of the present study was to compare the inflammation-driven migration and cytokine secretion profile of human bmMSCs to endometrial mesenchymal stem cells (eMSCs) and endometrial fibroblasts (eSFs). Materials and methods The bmMSCs were isolated from bone marrow aspirates through culturing, whereas eMSCs and eSFs were FACS-isolated. All cell types were tested for their surface marker, proliferation profiles and migration properties towards serum and inflammatory attractants. The cytokine/chemokine secretion profile of 35 targets was analysed in each cell type at basal level along with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced state. Results Both stem cell types, bmMSCs and eMSCs, presented with similar stem cell surface marker profiles as well as possessed high proliferation and migration potential compared to eSFs. In multiplex assays, the secretion of 16 cytokine targets was detected and LPS stimulation expanded the cytokine secretion pattern by triggering the secretion of several targets. The bmMSCs exhibited higher cytokine secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)A, stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF)-1 alpha, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), IL-6, interferon-gamma inducible protein (IP)-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1 alpha and RANTES compared to eMSCs and/or eSFs after stimulation with LPS. The basal IL-8 secretion was higher in both endometrial cell types compared to bmMSCs. Conclusion Our results highlight that similar to bmMSCs, the eMSCs possess high migration activity while the differentiation process towards stromal fibroblasts seemed to result in loss of stem cell surface markers, minimal migration activity and a subtler cytokine profile likely contributing to normal endometrial function
  • del Amo, Eva M.; Rimpelä, Anna-Kaisa Irmeli; Heikkinen, Emma; Kari, Otto K.; Ramsay, Eva; Lajunen, Tatu; Schmitt, Mechthild; Pelkonen, Laura; Bhattacharya, Madhushree; Richardson, Dominique; Subrizi, Astrid; Turunen, Tiina; Reinisalo, Mika; Itkonen, Jaakko; Toropainen, Elisa; Casteleijn, Marco G.; Kidron, Heidi; Antopolsky, Maxim; Vellonen, Kati-Sisko; Ruponen, Marika; Urtti, Arto (2017)
    Drug delivery to the posterior eye segment is an important challenge in ophthalmology, because many diseases affect the retina and choroid leading to impaired vision or blindness. Currently, intravitreal injections are the method of choice to administer drugs to the retina, but this approach is applicable only in selected cases (e.g. anti-VEGF antibodies and soluble receptors). There are two basic approaches that can be adopted to improve retinal drug delivery: prolonged and/or retina targeted delivery of intravitreal drugs and use of other routes of drug administration, such as periocular, suprachoroidal, sub-retinal, systemic, or topical. Properties of the administration route, drug and delivery system determine the efficacy and safety of these approaches. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors determine the required dosing rates and doses that are needed for drug action. In addition, tolerability factors limit the use of many materials in ocular drug delivery. This review article provides a critical discussion of retinal drug delivery, particularly from the pharmacokinetic point of view. This article does not include an extensive review of drug delivery technologies, because they have already been reviewed several times recently. Instead, we aim to provide a systematic and quantitative view on the pharmacokinetic factors in drug delivery to the posterior eye segment. This review is based on the literature and unpublished data from the authors' laboratory.
  • Bono, Petri; Massard, Christophe; Peltola, Katriina J.; Azaro, Analia; Italiano, Antoine; Kristeleit, Rebecca S.; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Lassen, Ulrik; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias; Hakulinen, Pasi; Garratt, Chris; Ikonen, Tarja; Mustonen, Mika V. J.; Rodon, Jordi A. (2020)
    Background Genetic alterations in fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) signalling are observed in various tumours. We report a first-in-human phase I/IIa trial evaluating tolerability, pharmacokinetics and preliminary antitumour activity of ODM-203, a novel FGFR and VEGFR inhibitor. Methods Open-label, non-randomised, multicentre, phase I/IIa dose escalation and expansion study in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumours. Results Overall, 84 patients received treatment; optimal tablet dose was found to be 400 mg/day with food. All patients experienced at least one adverse event; the majority (89.2%) were grade 1 or 2% and 70.4% were considered treatment related. The most commonly reported events were bilirubin increase-related events (75%) and diarrhoea (50%). Overall response rate was 9.2% and median progression-free survival was 16.1 and 12.4 weeks for patients with aberrant or non-aberrant FGFR tumours. Median time on treatment was 10.1 weeks for all patients and 14.5 weeks for patients who received 400 mg tablets. Conclusion This study suggests ODM-203 400 mg/day results in sufficient plasma concentrations and acceptable tolerability in most patients. Preliminary signs of therapeutic activity of ODM-203 in patients with solid tumours was observed.
  • Lokki, A. Inkeri; Heikkinen-Eloranta, Jenni (2021)
    Preeclampsia is a multifactorial vascular disease unique to human pregnancy. While genetic and antiangiogenic factors are important contributors to preeclampsia susceptibility, recent studies have shown that dysregulation and/or over-activation of the complement system has an integral role in dis-ease etiology. Furthermore, the role of the coagulation cascade may be underappreciated in the develop-ment of the disease. Traditionally, for research purposes, the pool of preeclampsia cases has been divided into non-severe and severe disease depending on the onset and severity of the symptoms. However, of particular interest are a small but important minority of cases that present with symptoms likening to those of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets syndrome, atypical hemolytic uremic syn-drome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, all thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) diseases, with the hallmark mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction and aberrant activation of complement and coagu-lation cascades. We therefore propose a third class, severe TMA-like preeclampsia to be included in the categorization of preeclampsia patients. Identifying these patients would target research, diagnostic dif-ferentiation, and novel treatment options to the subclass of patients with life-threatening disease that are most likely to benefit from next-generation drug development. (c) 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).