Browsing by Subject "ENTEROVIRUS INFECTIONS"

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  • DIABIMMUNE Study Grp; Simre, Kart; Uibo, Oivi; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Härkönen, Taina; Siljander, Heli; Virtanen, Suvi M.; Ilonen, Jorma; Hyöty, Heikki; Knip, Mikael (2019)
    Aim Our aim was to compare the presence of various common viruses (rhinovirus, enterovirus, adenovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, norovirus, parechovirus) in stool and nasal swab samples as well as virus-specific antibodies in serum samples between children who developed coeliac disease and controls. Methods A case-control study was established based on the DIABIMMUNE Study cohorts. During the study, eight Estonian children and 21 Finnish children aged 1.5 years to five years developed coeliac disease and each was matched with a disease-free control. Nasal swabs and stool samples were taken at the age of three to six months and the serum samples at the time of diagnosis. Results Rhinovirus ribonucleic acid was detected in the nasal swabs from five coeliac disease children, but none of the control children (p = 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in the level of viral antibodies between cases and controls. Enterovirus immunoglobulin G class antibodies were found more frequently in the Estonian than in the Finnish children (63% versus 23%, p = 0.02). Conclusion This study did not find any marked overall differences in laboratory-confirmed common viral infections between the children who developed coeliac disease and the controls. However, rhinovirus infections were detected slightly more often in those patients who developed coeliac disease.
  • DIABIMMUNE Study Grp; Korhonen, Laura; Oikarinen, Sami; Lehtonen, Jussi; Mustonen, Neea; Tyni, Iiris; Niemelä, Onni; Honkanen, Hanna; Huhtala, Heini; Ilonen, Jorma; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Peet, Aleksandr; Tillmann, Vallo; Siljander, Heli; Knip, Mikael; Lönnrot, Maria; Hyöty, Heikki; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa; Koski, Katriina; Kiviniemi, Minna; Ahlfors, Helena; Kallionpää, Henna; Laajala, Essi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Moulder, Robert; Nieminen, Janne; Ruohtula, Terhi; Vaarala, Outi; Alahuhta, Kirsi; Virtanen, Suvi M.; Kondrashova, Anita (2019)
    Previous data about the role of viruses in the development of allergic immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitization are contradictory. The aim of this study was to determine the possible associations between exposure to different viruses (rhinovirus, enterovirus, norovirus, and parechovirus) during the first year of life and IgE sensitization. Viruses were analyzed from stool samples collected monthly from infants participating in a prospective birth cohort study. From that study, 244 IgE sensitized case children and 244 nonsensitized control children were identified based on their allergen-specific IgE antibody levels at the age of 6, 18, and 36 months. Stool samples (n = 4576) from the case and control children were screened for the presence of rhinovirus, enterovirus, norovirus, and parechovirus RNA by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The study showed that rhinovirus was the most prevalent virus detected, present in 921 (20%) samples. None of the viruses were associated with IgE sensitization in the full cohort but after stratifying by sex, the number of rhinovirus positive samples was inversely associated with IgE sensitization in boys (odds ratio [OR]: 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69-0.94; P = 0.006). There was also a temporal relation between rhinoviruses and IgE sensitization, as rhinovirus exposure during the first 6 months of life was associated with a reduced risk of subsequent IgE sensitization in boys (OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.6-0.94; P = 0.016). In conclusion, early exposure to rhinoviruses was inversely associated with IgE sensitization but this protective association was restricted to boys.
  • Shakeel, Shabih; Seitsonen, Jani J. T.; Kajander, Tommi; Laurinmaki, Pasi; Hyypia, Timo; Susi, Petri; Butcher, Sarah J. (2013)
    Coxsackievirus A9 (CVA9) is an important pathogen of the Picornaviridae family. It utilizes cellular receptors from the integrin v family for binding to its host cells prior to entry and genome release. Among the integrins tested, it has the highest affinity for v6, which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) loop present on the C terminus of viral capsid protein, VP1. As the atomic model of CVA9 lacks the RGD loop, we used surface plasmon resonance, electron cryo-microscopy, and image reconstruction to characterize the capsid-integrin interactions and the conformational changes on genome release. We show that the integrin binds to the capsid with nanomolar affinity and that the binding of integrin to the virion does not induce uncoating, thereby implying that further steps are required for release of the genome. Electron cryo-tomography and single-particle image reconstruction revealed variation in the number and conformation of the integrins bound to the capsid, with the integrin footprint mapping close to the predicted site for the exposed RGD loop on VP1. Comparison of empty and RNA-filled capsid reconstructions showed that the capsid undergoes conformational changes when the genome is released, so that the RNA-capsid interactions in the N termini of VP1 and VP4 are lost, VP4 is removed, and the capsid becomes more porous, as has been reported for poliovirus 1, human rhinovirus 2, enterovirus 71, and coxsackievirus A7. These results are important for understanding the structural basis of integrin binding to CVA9 and the molecular events leading to CVA9 cell entry and uncoating.