Browsing by Subject "EPITHELIAL-MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION"

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  • Harma, Ville; Virtanen, Johannes; Mäkelä, Rami; Happonen, Antti; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Knuuttila, Matias; Kohonen, Pekka; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Kallioniemi, Olli; Nees, Matthias (2010)
  • Heby, Margareta; Karnevi, Emelie; Elebro, Jacob; Nodin, Björn; Eberhard, Jakob; Saukkonen, Kapo; Hagström, Jaana; Mustonen, Harri; Seppänen, Hanna; Haglund, Caj; Jirstrom, Karin; Larsson, Anna H. (2020)
    The outcome of periampullary adenocarcinomas remains poor with few treatment options. Podocalyxin-like protein (PODXL) is an anti-adhesive protein, the high expression of which has been shown to confer a poor prognosis in numerous malignancies. A correlation and adverse prognostic synergy between PODXL and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been observed in colorectal cancer. Here, we investigated whether this also applies to periampullary adenocarcinomas. We analyzed the immunohistochemical expression of PODXL and EGFR in tissue microarrays with tumors from two patient cohorts; (Cohort 1, n=175) and (Cohort 2, n=189). The effect of TGF-beta -induced expression and siRNA-mediated knockdown of PODXL and EGFR, were investigated in pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1) in vitro. We found a correlation between PODXL and EGFR in these cancers, and a synergistic adverse effect on survival. Furthermore, silencing PODXL in pancreatic cancer cells resulted in the down-regulation of EGFR, but not vice versa. Consequently, these findings suggest a functional link between PODXL and EGFR, and the potential combined utility as biomarkers possibly improving patient stratification. Further studies examining the mechanistic basis underlying these observations may open new avenues of targeted treatment options for subsets of patients affected by these particularly aggressive cancers.
  • Raykhel, Irina; Moafi, Fazeh; Myllymaki, Satu M.; Greciano, Patricia G.; Matlin, Karl S.; Moyano, Jose V.; Manninen, Aki; Myllyharju, Johanna (2018)
    Hypoxia and loss of cell polarity are common features of malignant carcinomas. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) is the major regulator of cellular hypoxia response and mediates the activation of similar to 300 genes. Increased HIF1 signaling is known to be associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. Here, we report that hypoxia disrupts polarized epithelial morphogenesis of MDCK cells in a HIF1 alpha-dependent manner by modulating the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) signaling pathway. Analysis of potential HIF1 targets in the TGF beta pathway identified the bone morphogenetic protein and activin membrane-bound inhibitor (BAMBI), a transmembrane glycoprotein related to the type I receptors of the TGF beta family, whose expression was essentially lost in HIF1-depleted cells. Similar to what was observed in HIF1-deficient cells, BAMBI-depleted cells failed to efficiently activate TGF beta signaling and retained epithelial polarity during hypoxia. Taken together, we show that hypoxic conditions promote TGF beta signaling in a HIF1-dependent manner and BAMBI is identified in this pathway as a novel HIF1-regulated gene that contributes to hypoxia-induced loss of epithelial polarity.
  • Slik, Khadija; Turkki, Riku; Carpen, Olli; Kurki, Samu; Korkeila, Eija; Sundström, Jari; Pellinen, Teijo (2019)
    Current risk factors in stage II colorectal carcinoma are insufficient to guide treatment decisions. Loss of CDX2 has been shown to associate with poor clinical outcome and predict benefit for adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III colorectal carcinoma. The prognostic relevance of CDX2 in stage II disease has not been sufficiently validated, especially in relation to clinical risk factors, such as microsatellite instability (MSI) status, BRAF mutation status, and tumor budding. In this study, we evaluated the protein expression of CDX2 in tumor center and front areas in a tissue microarrays material of stage II colorectal carcinoma patients (n=232). CDX2 expression showed a partial or total loss in respective areas in 8.6% and 10.9% of patient cases. Patients with loss of CDX2 had shorter disease-specific survival when scored independently either in tumor center or tumor front areas (log rank P=0.012; P=0.012). Loss of CDX2 predicted survival independently of other stage II risk factors, such as MSI status and BRAF mutation status, pT class, and tumor budding (hazard ratio=5.96, 95% confidence interval=1.55-22.95; hazard ratio=3.70, 95% confidence interval=1.30-10.56). Importantly, CDX2 loss predicted inferior survival only in patients with microsatellite stable, but not with MSI-high phenotype. Interestingly, CDX2 loss associated with low E-cadherin expression, tight junction disruption, and high expression of ezrin protein. The work demonstrates that loss of CDX2 is an independent risk factor of poor disease-specific survival in stage II colorectal carcinoma. Furthermore, the study suggests that CDX2 loss is linked with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition independently of tumor budding.
  • Saare, Merli; Rekker, Kadri; Laisk-Podar, Triin; Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Zondervan, Krina; Salumets, Andres; Götte, Martin; Peters, Maire (2017)
    In order to uncover miRNA changes in endometriosis pathogenesis, both endometriotic lesions and endometrial biopsies, as well as stromal and epithelial cells isolated from these tissues have been investigated and a large number of dysregulated miRNAs have been reported. However, the concordance between the result of different studies has remained small. One potential explanation for limited overlap between the proposed disease-related miRNAs could be the heterogeneity in tissue composition, as some studies have compared highly heterogeneous whole-lesion biopsies with endometrial tissue, some have compared the endometrium from patients and controls, and some have used pure cell fractions isolated from lesions and endometrium. This review focuses on the results of published miRNA studies in endometriosis to reveal the potential impact of tissue heterogeneity on the discovery of disease-specific miRNA alterations in endometriosis. Additionally, functional studies that explore the roles of endometriosis-involved miRNAs are discussed.
  • Magnussen, Synnove Norvoll; Hadler-Olsen, Elin; Costea, Daniela Elena; Berg, Eli; Jacobsen, Cristiane Cavalcanti; Mortensen, Bente; Salo, Tuula; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Inigo; Winberg, Jan-Olof; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Svineng, Gunbjorg (2017)
    Background: Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor (uPAR) is up-regulated at the invasive tumour front of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), indicating a role for uPAR in tumour progression. We previously observed elevated expression of uPAR at the tumour-stroma interface in a mouse model for OSCC, which was associated with increased proteolytic activity. The tumour microenvironment regulated uPAR expression, as well as its glycosylation and cleavage. Both full-length- and cleaved uPAR (uPAR (II-III)) are involved in highly regulated processes such as cell signalling, proliferation, migration, stem cell mobilization and invasion. The aim of the current study was to analyse tumour associated factors and their effect on uPAR cleavage, and the potential implications for cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Methods: Mouse uPAR was stably overexpressed in the mouse OSCC cell line AT84. The ratio of full-length versus cleaved uPAR as analysed by Western blotting and its regulation was assessed by addition of different protease inhibitors and transforming growth factor - beta 1 (TGF-beta 1). The role of uPAR cleavage in cell proliferation and migration was analysed using real- time cell analysis and invasion was assessed using the myoma invasion model. Results: We found that when uPAR was overexpressed a proportion of the receptor was cleaved, thus the cells presented both full-length uPAR and uPAR (II-III). Cleavage was mainly performed by serine proteases and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in particular. When the OSCC cells were stimulated with TGF-beta 1, the production of the uPA inhibitor PAI-1 was increased, resulting in a reduction of uPAR cleavage. By inhibiting cleavage of uPAR, cell migration was reduced, and by inhibiting uPA activity, invasion was reduced. We could also show that medium containing soluble uPAR (suPAR), and cleaved soluble uPAR (suPAR (II-III)), induced migration in OSCC cells with low endogenous levels of uPAR. Conclusions: These results show that soluble factors in the tumour microenvironment, such as TGF-beta 1, PAI-1 and uPA, can influence the ratio of full length and uPAR (II-III) and thereby potentially effect cell migration and invasion. Resolving how uPAR cleavage is controlled is therefore vital for understanding how OSCC progresses and potentially provides new targets for therapy.
  • Carnielli, Carolina Moretto; Soares Macedo, Carolina Carneiro; De Rossi, Tatiane; Granato, Daniela Campos; Rivera, Cesar; Domingues, Romenia Ramos; Pauletti, Bianca Alves; Yokoo, Sami; Heberle, Henry; Busso-Lopes, Ariane Fidelis; Cervigne, Nilva Karla; Sawazaki-Calone, Iris; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Marchi, Fabio Albuquerque; Telles, Guilherme Pimentel; Minghim, Rosane; Prado Ribeiro, Ana Carolina; Brandao, Thais Bianca; Castro, Gilberto de; Alejandro Gonzalez-Arriagada, Wilfredo; Gomes, Alexandre; Penteado, Fabio; Santos-Silva, Alan Roger; Lopes, Marcio Ajudarte; Rodrigues, Priscila Campioni; Sundquist, Elias; Salo, Tuula; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.; Graner, Edgard; Fox, Jay W.; Della Coletta, Ricardo; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco (2018)
    Different regions of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have particular histopathological and molecular characteristics limiting the standard tumor-node-metastasis prognosis classification. Therefore, defining biological signatures that allow assessing the prognostic outcomes for OSCC patients would be of great clinical significance. Using histopathology-guided discovery proteomics, we analyze neoplastic islands and stroma from the invasive tumor front (ITF) and inner tumor to identify differentially expressed proteins. Potential signature proteins are prioritized and further investigated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and targeted proteomics. IHC indicates low expression of cystatin-B in neoplastic islands from the ITF as an independent marker for local recurrence. Targeted proteomics analysis of the prioritized proteins in saliva, combined with machine-learning methods, highlights a peptide-based signature as the most powerful predictor to distinguish patients with and without lymph node metastasis. In summary, we identify a robust signature, which may enhance prognostic decisions in OSCC and better guide treatment to reduce tumor recurrence or lymph node metastasis.
  • Väyrynen, Otto; Piippo, Markku; Jämsä, Hannaleena; Väisänen, Tuomas; de Almeida, Carlos E. B.; Salo, Tuula; Missailidis, Sotiris; Risteli, Maija (2018)
    Chemoradiation is an established approach in the treatment of advanced oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC), but therapy may cause severe side-effects due to signal interchanges between carcinoma and the tumour microenvironment (TME). In this study, we examined the potential use of our human 3D myoma disc and Myogel models in in vitro chemoradiation studies by analysing the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) and the combined effect of heparanase 1 (HPSE1) inhibitors and IR on OTSCC cell proliferation, invasion and MMP-2 and - 9 production. Finally, we analysed the long-term effects of IR by studying clones of previously irradiated and invaded HSC-3 cells. We found that in both human uterine leiomyoma-based extracellular matrix models IR inhibited the invasion of HSC-3 cells, but blocking HPSE1 activity combined with IR induced their invasion. Low doses of IR increased MMP expression and initiated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cells cultured on myoma discs. We conclude that myoma models offer consistent methods for testing human carcinoma cell invasion and phenotypic changes during chemoradiation treatment. In addition, we showed that IR had long-term effects on MMP-2 and - 9, which might elicit different HSC-3 invasion responses when cells were under the challenge of HPSE1 inhibitors and IR.
  • Almangush, Alhadi; Leivo, Ilmo; Siponen, Maria; Sundquist, Elias; Mroueh, Rayan; Mäkitie, Antti A.; Soini, Ylermi; Haglund, Caj; Nieminen, Pentti; Salo, Tuula (2018)
    It is of great clinical importance to identify simple prognostic markers from preoperative biopsies that could guide treatment planning. Here, we compared tumor budding (B), depth of invasion (D), and the combined scores (i.e., budding and depth of invasion (BD) histopathologic model) in preoperative biopsies and the corresponding postoperative specimens of oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC). Tumor budding and depth of invasion were evaluated in the pre- and postoperative samples from 100 patients treated for OTSCC. Sensitivity and specificity statistics were used. Our results showed statistically significant (P <0.001) relationship between pre- and postoperative BD scores. There was an agreement between the pre- and postoperative BD model scores in 83 cases (83%) with 57.1% sensitivity (95% CI 39.4 to 73.7%) and 96.9% specificity (95% CI 89.3 to 99.6%). Our findings suggest that the BD model, analyzed from representative biopsies, could be used for the treatment planning of OTSCC.
  • Strauss, Philipp; Marti, Hans-Peter; Beisland, Christian; Scherer, Andreas; Vegard, Lysne; Leh, Sabine; Flatberg, Arnar; Koch, Even; Beisvag, Vidar; Landolt, Lea; Skogstrand, Trude; Eikrem, Oystein S. (2018)
    Novel predictive tools for clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) are urgently needed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been increasingly investigated for their predictive value, and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy archives may potentially be a valuable source of miRNA sequencing material, as they remain an underused resource. Core biopsies of both cancerous and adjacent normal tissues were obtained from patients (n = 12) undergoing nephrectomy. After small RNA-seq, several analyses were performed, including classifier evaluation, obesity-related inquiries, survival analysis using publicly available datasets, comparisons to the current literature and ingenuity pathway analyses. In a comparison of tumour vs. normal, 182 miRNAs were found with significant differential expression; miR-155 was of particular interest as it classified all ccRCC samples correctly and correlated well with tumour size (R-2 = 0.83); miR-155 also predicted poor survival with hazard ratios of 2.58 and 1.81 in two different TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) datasets in a univariate model. However, in a multivariate Cox regression analysis including age, sex, cancer stage and histological grade, miR-155 was not a statistically significant survival predictor. In conclusion, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsy tissues are a viable source of miRNA-sequencing material. Our results further support a role for miR-155 as a promising cancer classifier and potentially as a therapeutic target in ccRCC that merits further investigation.
  • Mohamed, Hesham; Haglund, Caj; Jouhi, Lauri; Atula, Timo; Hagström, Jaana; Mäkitie, Antti (2020)
    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is subclassified by the World Health Organization into two different entities: human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive and HPV-negative tumors. HPV infection promotes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and transformation of keratinocyte stem cells into cancer stem cells. EMT is a crucial process in the carcinogenesis of epithelial-derived malignancies, and we aimed to study the role of its markers in OPSCC. This study consists of 202 consecutive OPSCC patients diagnosed and treated with curative intent. We examined E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and vimentin expression using immunohistochemistry and compared these with tumor and patient characteristics and treatment outcome. We found that the cell-membranous expression of beta-catenin was stronger in HPV-positive than in HPV-negative tumors, and it was stronger in the presence of regional metastasis. The stromal vimentin expression was stronger among HPV-positive tumors. A high E-cadherin expression was associated with tumor grade. No relationship between these markers and survival emerged. In conclusion, beta-catenin and vimentin seem to play different roles in OPSCC: the former in the tumor tissue itself, and the latter in the tumor stroma. HPV infection may exploit the beta-catenin and vimentin pathways in carcinogenic process. More, beta-catenin may serve as a marker for the occurrence of regional metastasis:
  • Rodrigues, Priscila Campioni; Sawazaki-Calone, Iris; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; Soares Macedo, Carolina Carneiro; Dourado, Mauricio Rocha; Cervigne, Nilva K.; Miguel, Marcia Costa; do Carmo, Andreia Ferreira; Lambert, Daniel W.; Graner, Edgard; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Salo, Tuula A.; Coletta, Ricardo D. (2017)
    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) prognosis is related to clinical stage and histological grade. However, this stratification needs to be refined. We conducted a comparative proteome study in microdissected samples from normal oral mucosa and OSCC to identify biomarkers for malignancy. Fascin and plectin were identified as differently expressed and both are implicated in several malignancies, but the clinical impacts of aberrant fascin and plectin expression in OSCCs remains largely unknown. Immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR were carried out in ex vivo OSCC samples and cell lines. A loss-of-function strategy using shRNA targeting fascin was employed to investigate in vitro and in vivo the fascin role on oral tumorigenesis. Transfections of microRNA mimics were performed to determine whether the fascin overexpression is regulated by miR-138 and miR-145. We found that fascin and plectin are frequently upregulated in OSCC samples and cell lines, but only fascin overexpression is an independent unfavorable prognostic indicator of disease-specific survival. In combination with advanced T stage, high fascin level is also an independent factor of disease-free survival. Knockdown of fascin in OSCC cells promoted cell adhesion and inhibited migration, invasion and EMT, and forced expression of miR-138 in OSCC cells significantly decreased the expression of fascin. In addition, fascin downregulation leads to reduced filopodia formation and decrease on paxillin expression. The subcutaneous xenograft model showed that tumors formed in the presence of low levels of fascin were significantly smaller compared to those formed with high fascin levels. Collectively, our findings suggest that fascin expression correlates with disease progression and may serve as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target for patients with OSCC.
  • Alkasalias, Twana; Moyano-Galceran, Lidia; Arsenian-Henriksson, Marie; Lehti, Kaisa (2018)
    Tumorigenesis is a complex process involving dynamic interactions between malignant cells and their surrounding stroma, including both the cellular and acellular components. Within the stroma, fibroblasts represent not only a predominant cell type, but also a major source of the acellular tissue microenvironment comprising the extracellular matrix (ECM) and soluble factors. Normal fibroblasts can exert diverse suppressive functions against cancer initiating and metastatic cells via direct cell-cell contact, paracrine signaling by soluble factors, and ECM integrity. The loss of such suppressive functions is an inherent step in tumor progression. A tumor cell-induced switch of normal fibroblasts into cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), in turn, triggers a range of pro-tumorigenic signals accompanied by distraction of the normal tissue architecture, thus creating an optimal niche for cancer cells to grow extensively. To further support tumor progression and metastasis, CAFs secrete factors such as ECM remodeling enzymes that further modify the tumor microenvironment in combination with the altered adhesive forces and cell-cell interactions. These paradoxical tumor suppressive and promoting actions of fibroblasts are the focus of this review, highlighting the heterogenic molecular properties of both normal and cancer-associated fibroblasts, as well as their main mechanisms of action, including the emerging impact on immunomodulation and different therapy responses.
  • Calabrese, Fiorella; Kipar, Anja; Lunardi, Francesca; Balestro, Elisabetta; Perissinotto, Egle; Rossi, Emanuela; Nannini, Nazarena; Marulli, Giuseppe; Stewart, James P.; Rea, Federico (2013)
  • Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A.; Kaur, Sippy; Potdar, Swapnil; Khan, Sofia; Netti, Eliisa; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Yadav, Bhagwan; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Heikkilä, Päivi; Saarela, Jani; Bützow, Ralf; Blomqvist, Carl; Nevanlinna, Heli (2021)
  • Kovac, Bianca; Makela, Tomi P.; Vallenius, Tea (2018)
    The controlled formation and stabilization of E-cadherin-based adhesions is vital for epithelial integrity. This requires co-operation between the E-cadherin-based adhesions and the associated actin cytoskeleton. In cancer, this co-operation often fails, predisposing cells to migration through molecular mechanisms that have only been partially characterized. Here, we demonstrate that the actin filament cross-linker alpha-actinin-1 is frequently increased in human breast cancer. In mammary epithelial cells, the increased alpha-actinin-1 levels promote cell migration and induce disorganized acini-like structures in Matrigel. This is accompanied by a major reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the associated E-cadherin-based adhesions. Increased expression of alpha-actinin-1 is particularly noted in basal-like breast cancer cell lines, and in breast cancer patients it associates with poor prognosis in basal-like subtypes. Downregulation of alpha-actinin-1 in E-cadherin expressing basal-like breast cancer cells demonstrate that alpha-actinin-1-assembled actin fibers destabilize E-cadherin-based adhesions. Taken together, these results indicate that increased alpha-actinin-1 expression destabilizes E-cadherin-based adhesions, which is likely to promote the migratory potential of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, our results identify alpha-actinin-1 as a candidate prognostic biomarker in basal-like breast cancer.
  • Rantala, Juha K.; Edgren, Henrik; Lehtinen, Laura; Wolf, Maija; Kleivi, Kristine; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Aaltola, Anna-Riina; Laasola, Petra; Kilpinen, Sami; Saviranta, Petri; Iljin, Kristiina; Kallioniemi, Olli (2010)
    Aneuploidy is among the most obvious differences between normal and cancer cells. However, mechanisms contributing to development and maintenance of aneuploid cell growth are diverse and incompletely understood. Functional genomics analyses have shown that aneuploidy in cancer cells is correlated with diffuse gene expression signatures and that aneuploidy can arise by a variety of mechanisms, including cytokinesis failures, DNA endoreplication and possibly through polyploid intermediate states. Here, we used a novel cell spot microarray technique to identify genes with a loss-of-function effect inducing polyploidy and/or allowing maintenance of polyploid cell growth of breast cancer cells. Integrative genomics profiling of candidate genes highlighted GINS2 as a potential oncogene frequently overexpressed in clinical breast cancers as well as in several other cancer types. Multivariate analysis indicated GINS2 to be an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer outcome (p = 0.001). Suppression of GINS2 expression effectively inhibited breast cancer cell growth and induced polyploidy. In addition, protein level detection of nuclear GINS2 accurately distinguished actively proliferating cancer cells suggesting potential use as an operational biomarker.
  • Pehkonen, Henna; von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Karhemo, Piia-Riitta; Lepikhova, Tatiana; Grenman, Reidar; Lehti, Kaisa; Monni, Outi (2016)
    PPFIA1 is located at the 11q13 region, which is one of the most commonly amplified regions in several epithelial cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and breast carcinoma. Considering the location of PPFIA1 in this amplicon, we examined whether protein encoded by PPFIA1, liprin-alpha 1, possesses oncogenic properties in relevant carcinoma cell lines. Our results indicate that liprin-alpha 1 localizes to different adhesion and cytoskeletal structures to regulate vimentin intermediate filament network, thereby altering the invasion and growth properties of the cancer cells. In non-invasive cells liprin-alpha 1 promotes expansive growth behavior with limited invasive capacity, whereas in invasive cells liprin-alpha 1 has significant impact on mesenchymal cancer cell invasion in three-dimensional collagen. Current results identify liprin-a1 as a novel regulator of the tumor cell intermediate filaments with differential oncogenic properties in actively proliferating or motile cells.
  • Turunen, S. Pauliina; Tatti-Bugaeva, Olga; Lehti, Kaisa (2017)
    Membrane-type matrix metalloproteases (MT-MMP) are pivotal regulators of cell invasion, growth and survival. Tethered to the cell membranes by a transmembrane domain or GPI-anchor, the six MT-MMPs can exert these functions via cell surface-associated extracellular matrix degradation or proteolytic protein processing, including shedding or release of signaling receptors, adhesion molecules, growth factors and other pericellular proteins. By interactions with signaling scaffold or cytoskeleton, the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the transmembrane MT-MMPs further extends their functionality to signaling or structural relay. MT-MMPs are differentially expressed in cancer. The most extensively studied MMP14/MT1-MMP is induced in various cancers along malignant transformation via pathways activated by mutations in tumor suppressors or proto-oncogenes and changes in tumor microenvironment including cellular heterogeneity, extracellular matrix composition, tissue oxygenation, and inflammation. Classically such induction involves transcriptional programs related to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Besides inhibition by endogenous tissue inhibitors, MT-MMP activities are spatially and timely regulated at multiple levels by microtubular vesicular trafficking, dimerization/oligomerization, other interactions and localization in the actin-based invadosomes, in both tumor and the stroma. The functions of MT-MMPs are multifaceted within reciprocal cellular responses in the evolving tumor microenvironment, which poses the importance of these proteases beyond the central function as matrix scissors, and necessitates us to rethink MT-MMPs as dynamic signaling proteases of cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Matrix Metalloproteinases edited by Rafael Fridman.
  • Gonzalez-Molina, Jordi; Gramolelli, Silvia; Liao, Zehuan; Carlson, Joseph W.; Ojala, Päivi M.; Lehti, Kaisa (2019)
    Sarcomas are deadly malignant tumors of mesenchymal origin occurring at all ages. The expression and function of the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase MMP14 is closely related to the mesenchymal cell phenotype, and it is highly expressed in most sarcomas. MMP14 regulates the activity of multiple extracellular and plasma membrane proteins, influencing cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) communication. This regulation mediates processes such as ECM degradation and remodeling, cell invasion, and cancer metastasis. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of the biology of MMP14 in sarcomas will shed light on the mechanisms controlling the key processes in these diseases. Here, we provide an overview of the function and regulation of MMP14 and we discuss their relationship with clinical and pre-clinical MMP14 data in both adult and childhood sarcomas.