Browsing by Subject "ER STRESS"

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  • Huttunen, Henri J.; Saarma, Mart (2019)
    Neurotrophic factors (NTF) are a subgroup of growth factors that promote survival and differentiation of neurons. Due to their neuroprotective and neurorestorative properties, their therapeutic potential has been tested in various neurodegenerative diseases. Bioavailability of NTFs in the target tissue remains a major challenge for NTF-based therapies. Various intracerebral delivery approaches, both protein and gene transfer-based, have been tested with varying outcomes. Three growth factors, glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurturin (NRTN) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) have been tested in clinical trials in Parkinson?s Disease (PD) during the past 20 years. A new protein can now be added to this list, as cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) has recently entered clinical trials. Despite their misleading names, CDNF, together with its closest relative mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF), form a novel family of unconventional NTF that are both structurally and mechanistically distinct from other growth factors. CDNF and MANF are localized mainly to the lumen of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and their primary function appears to be modulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Prolonged ER stress, via the UPR signaling pathways, contributes to the pathogenesis in a number of chronic degenerative diseases, and is an important target for therapeutic modulation. Intraputamenally administered recombinant human CDNF has shown robust neurorestorative effects in a number of small and large animal models of PD, and had a good safety profile in preclinical toxicology studies. Intermittent monthly bilateral intraputamenal infusions of CDNF are currently being tested in a randomized placebo-controlled phase I?II clinical study in moderately advanced PD patients. Here, we review the history of growth factor-based clinical trials in PD, and discuss how CDNF differs from the previously tested growth factors.
  • Lantto, Tiina A.; Laakso, Into; Dorman, H. J. Damien; Mauriala, Timo; Hiltunen, Raimo; Köks, Sulev; Raasmaja, Atso (2016)
    Plant phenolics have shown to activate apoptotic cell death in different tumourigenic cell lines. In this study, we evaluated the effects of juniper berry extract (Juniperus communis L.) on p53 protein, gene expression and DNA fragmentation in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, we analyzed the phenolic composition of the extract. We found that juniper berry extract activated cellular relocalization of p53 and DNA fragmentation-dependent cell death. Differentially expressed genes between treated and non-treated cells were evaluated with the cDNA-RDA (representational difference analysis) method at the early time point of apoptotic process when p53 started to be activated and no caspase activity was detected. Twenty one overexpressed genes related to cellular stress, protein synthesis, cell survival and death were detected. Interestingly, they included endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer and sensor HSPA5 and other ER stress-related genes CALM2 and YKT6 indicating that ER stress response was involved in juniper berry extract mediated cell death. In composition analysis, we identified and quantified low concentrations of fifteen phenolic compounds. The main groups of them were flavones, flavonols, phenolic acids, flavanol and biflavonoid including glycosides of quercetin, apigenin, isoscutellarein and hypolaetin. It is suggested that juniper berry extract induced the p53-associated apoptosis through the potentiation and synergism by several phenolic compounds.
  • Lindholm, Päivi; Saarma, Mart (2022)
    Midbrain dopamine neurons deteriorate in Parkinson's disease (PD) that is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder. No cure is available that would stop the dopaminergic decline or restore function of injured neurons in PD. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs), e.g., glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) are small, secreted proteins that promote neuron survival during mammalian development and regulate adult neuronal plasticity, and they are studied as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, results from clinical trials of GDNF and related NTF neurturin (NRTN) in PD have been modest so far. In this review, we focus on cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF), an unconventional neurotrophic protein. CDNF delivered to the brain parenchyma protects and restores dopamine neurons in animal models of PD. In a recent Phase I-II clinical trial CDNF was found safe and well tolerated. CDNF deletion in mice led to age-dependent functional changes in the brain dopaminergic system and loss of enteric neurons resulting in slower gastrointestinal motility. These defects in Cdnf(-/-) mice intriguingly resemble deficiencies observed in early stage PD. Different from classical NTFs, CDNF can function both as an extracellular trophic factor and as an intracellular, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) luminal protein that protects neurons and other cell types against ER stress. Similarly to the homologous mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF), CDNF is able to regulate ER stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling and promote protein homeostasis in the ER. Since ER stress is thought to be one of the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to the dopaminergic degeneration in PD, CDNF, and its small-molecule derivatives that are under development may provide useful tools for experimental medicine and future therapies for the treatment of PD and other neurodegenerative protein-misfolding diseases.
  • Lindahl, Maria; Chalazonitis, Alcmene; Palm, Erik; Pakarinen, Emmi; Danilova, Tatiana; Pham, Tuan D.; Setlik, Wanda; Rao, Meenakshi; Voikar, Vootele; Huotari, Jatta; Kopra, Jaakko; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Piepponen, Petteri T.; Airavaara, Mikko; Panhelainen, Anne; Gershon, Michael D.; Saarma, Mart (2020)
    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) is neuroprotective for nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and restores dopaminergic function in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD). To understand the role of CDNF in mammals, we generated CDNF knockout mice (Cdnf(-/-)), which are viable, fertile, and have a normal life-span. Surprisingly, an age-dependent loss of enteric neurons occurs selectively in the submucosal but not in the myenteric plexus. This neuronal loss is a consequence not of increased apoptosis but of neurodegeneration and autophagy. Quantitatively, the neurodegeneration and autophagy found in the submucosal plexus in duodenum, ileum and colon of the Cdnf(-/-) mouse are much greater than in those of Cdnf(+/+) mice. The selective vulnerability of submucosal neurons to the absence of CDNF is reminiscent of the tendency of pathological abnormalities to occur in the submucosal plexus in biopsies of patients with PD. In contrast, the number of substantia nigra dopamine neurons and dopamine and its metabolite concentrations in the striatum are unaltered in Cdnf(-/-) mice; however, there is an age-dependent deficit in the function of the dopamine system in Cdnf(-/-) male mice analyzed. This is observed as D-amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, aberrant dopamine transporter function, and as increased D-amphetamine-induced dopamine release demonstrating that dopaminergic axon terminal function in the striatum of the Cdnf(-/-) mouse brain is altered. The deficiencies of Cdnf(-/-) mice, therefore, are reminiscent of those seen in early stages of Parkinson's disease.
  • Goldsteins, Gundars; Hakosalo, Vili; Jaronen, Merja; Keuters, Meike Hedwig; Lehtonen, Sarka; Koistinaho, Jari (2022)
    A single paragraph of about 200 words maximum. Neurodegenerative diseases (ND), such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, pose a global challenge in the aging population due to the lack of treatments for their cure. Despite various disease-specific clinical symptoms, ND have some fundamental common pathological mechanisms involving oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. The present review focuses on the major causes of central nervous system (CNS) redox homeostasis imbalance comprising mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Mitochondrial disturbances, leading to reduced mitochondrial function and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, are thought to be a major contributor to the pathogenesis of ND. ER dysfunction has been implicated in ND in which protein misfolding evidently causes ER stress. The consequences of ER stress ranges from an increase in ROS production to altered calcium efflux and proinflammatory signaling in glial cells. Both pathological pathways have links to ferroptotic cell death, which has been implicated to play an important role in ND. Pharmacological targeting of these pathological pathways may help alleviate or slow down neurodegeneration.
  • Hulmi, Juha J.; Hentila, Jaakko; DeRuisseau, Keith C.; Oliveira, Bernardo M.; Papaioannou, Konstantinos G.; Autio, Reija; Kujala, Urho M.; Ritvos, Olli; Kainulainen, Heikki; Korkmaz, Ayhan; Atalay, Mustafa (2016)
    Protein homeostasis in cells, proteostasis, is maintained through several integrated processes and pathways and its dysregulation may mediate pathology in many diseases including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Oxidative stress, heat shock proteins, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and its response, i.e. unfolded protein response (UPR), play key roles in proteostasis but their involvement in the pathology of DMD are largely unknown. Moreover, exercise and activin receptor IIB blocking are two strategies that may be beneficial to DMD muscle, but studies to examine their effects on these proteostasis pathways are lacking. Therefore, these pathways were examined in the muscle of mdx mice, a model of DMD, under basal conditions and in response to seven weeks of voluntary exercise and/or activin receptor IIB ligand blocking using soluble activin receptor-Fc (sAcvR2B-Fc) administration. In conjunction with reduced muscle strength, mdx muscle displayed greater levels of UPR/ER-pathway indicators including greater protein levels of IREloc, PERK and Atf6b mRNA. Downstream to IREloc and PERK, spliced Xbpl mRNA and phosphorylation of elF2oc, were also increased. Most of the cytoplasmic and ER chaperones and mitochondrial UPR markers were unchanged in mdx muscle. Oxidized glutathione was greater in mdx and was associated with increases in lysine acetylated proteome and phosphorylated sirtuin 1. Exercise increased oxidative stress when performed independently or combined with sAcvR2B-Fc administration. Although neither exercise nor sAcvR2B-Fc administration imparted a clear effect on ER stress/UPR pathways or heat shock proteins, sAcvR2B-Fc administration increased protein expression levels of GRP78/BiP, a triggering factor for ER stress/UPR activation and TxNIP, a redox-regulator of ER stress-induced inflammation. In conclusion, the ER stress and UPR are increased in mdx muscle. However, these processes are not distinctly improved by voluntary exercise or blocking activin receptor IIB ligands and thus do not appear to be optimal therapeutic choices for improving proteostasis in DMD. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Screen, Mark; Raheem, Olayinka; Holmlund-Hampf, Jeanette; Jonson, Per Harald; Huovinen, Sanna; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne (2014)
  • Vainio, Paula; Mpindi, John Patrick; Kohonen, Pekka; Fey, Vidal; Mirtti, Tuomas; Alanen, Kalle A.; Perala, Merja; Kallioniemi, Olli; Iljin, Kristiina (2012)
  • Konovalova, Julia; Gerasymchuk, Dmytro; Arroyo, Sergio Navarette; Kluske, Sven; Mastroianni, Francesca; Pereyra, Alba Vargas; Domanskyi, Andrii (2021)
    Mesencephalic astrocyte derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) and cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) are novel evolutionary conserved trophic factors, which exhibit cytoprotective activity via negative regulation of unfolded protein response (UPR) and inflammation. Despite multiple reports demonstrating detrimental effect of MANF/CDNF downregulation, little is known about the control of their expression. miRNAs-small non-coding RNAs-are important regulators of gene expression. Their dysregulation was demonstrated in multiple pathological processes and their ability to modulate levels of other neurotrophic factors, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), was previously reported. Here, for the first time we demonstrated direct regulation of MANF and CDNF by miRNAs. Using bioinformatic tools, reporter assay and analysis of endogenous MANF and CDNF, we identified that miR-144 controls MANF expression, and miR-134 and miR-141 downregulate CDNF levels. We also demonstrated that this effect is human-specific and is executed via predicted binding sites of corresponding miRNAs. Finally, we found that miR-382 suppressed hCDNF expression indirectly. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time direct regulation of MANF and CDNF expression by specific miRNAs, despite the fact their binding sites are not strongly evolutionary conserved. Furthermore, we demonstrate a functional effect of miR-144 mediated regulation of MANF on ER stress response markers. These findings emphasize that (1) prediction of miRNA targets based on evolutionary conservation may miss biologically meaningful regulatory pairs; and (2) interpretation of miRNA regulatory effects in animal models should be cautiously validated.
  • Balboa, Diego; Saarimäki-Vire, Jonna; Borshagovski, Daniel; Survila, Mantas; Lindholm, Päivi; Galli, Emilia; Eurola, Solja; Ustinov, Jarkko; Grym, Heli; Huopio, Hanna; Partanen, Juha; Wartiovaara, Kirmo; Otonkoski, Timo (2018)
    Insulin gene mutations are a leading cause of neonatal diabetes. They can lead to proinsulin misfolding and its retention in endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This results in increased ER-stress suggested to trigger beta-cell apoptosis. In humans, the mechanisms underlying beta-cell failure remain unclear. Here we show that misfolded proinsulin impairs developing beta-cell proliferation without increasing apoptosis. We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from people carrying insulin (INS) mutations, engineered isogenic CRISPR-Cas9 mutation-corrected lines and differentiated them to beta-like cells. Single-cell RNA-sequencing analysis showed increased ER-stress and reduced proliferation in INS-mutant beta-like cells compared with corrected controls. Upon transplantation into mice, INS-mutant grafts presented reduced insulin secretion and aggravated ER-stress. Cell size, mTORC1 signaling, and respiratory chain subunits expression were all reduced in INS-mutant beta-like cells, yet apoptosis was not increased at any stage. Our results demonstrate that neonatal diabetes-associated INS-mutations lead to defective beta-cell mass expansion, contributing to diabetes development.
  • Pakarinen, Emmi; Danilova, Tatiana; Voikar, Vootele; Chmielarz, Piotr; Piepponen, Petteri; Airavaara, Mikko; Saarma, Mart; Lindahl, Maria (2020)
    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) localized protein that regulates ER homeostasis and unfolded protein response (UPR). The biology of endogenous MANF in the mammalian brain is unknown and therefore we studied the brain phenotype of MANF-deficient female and male mice at different ages focusing on the midbrain dopamine system and cortical neurons. We show that a lack of MANF from the brain led to the chronic activation of UPR by upregulation of the endoribonuclease activity of the inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (IRE1 alpha) pathway. Furthermore, in the aged MANF-deficient mouse brain in addition the protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) branches of the UPR pathways were activated. Neuronal loss in neurodegenerative diseases has been associated with chronic ER stress. In our mouse model, increased UPR activation did not lead to neuronal cell loss in the substantia nigra (SN), decrease of striatal dopamine or behavioral changes of MANF-deficient mice. However, cortical neurons lacking MANF were more vulnerable to chemical induction of additional ER stress in vitro. We conclude that embryonic neuronal deletion of MANF does not cause the loss of midbrain dopamine neurons in mice. However, endogenous MANF is needed for maintenance of neuronal ER homeostasis both in vivo and in vitro.
  • Lindahl, Maria; Danilova, Tatiana; Palm, Erik; Lindholm, Paivi; Voikar, Vootele; Hakonen, Elina; Ustinov, Jarkko; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle; Harvey, Brandon K.; Otonkoski, Timo; Rossi, Jari; Saarma, Mart (2014)
    All forms of diabetes mellitus (DM) are characterized by the loss of functional pancreatic β cell mass, leading to insufficient insulin secretion. Thus, identification of novel approaches to protect and restore β cells is essential for the development of DM therapies. Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress-inducible protein, but its physiological role in mammals has remained obscure. We generated MANF-deficient mice that strikingly develop severe diabetes due to progressive postnatal reduction of β cell mass, caused by decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Additionally, we show that lack of MANF in vivo in mouse leads to chronic unfolded protein response (UPR) activation in pancreatic islets. Importantly, MANF protein enhanced β cell proliferation in vitro and overexpression of MANF in the pancreas of diabetic mice enhanced β cell regeneration. We demonstrate that MANF specifically promotes β cell proliferation and survival, thereby constituting a therapeutic candidate for β cell protection and regeneration.
  • Nam, Jinhan; Koppinen, Tapani K.; Voutilainen, Merja H. (2021)
    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell mediated demyelination in central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a widely used in vivo disease model of MS. Glucocorticoids such as dexamethasone (dex) function as immunosuppressants and are commonly used to treat acute exacerbations of MS. Dex is also often used as a positive control in EAE studies, as it has been shown to promote motor behavior, inhibit immune cell infiltration into the CNS and regulate the activation of glial cell in EAE. This study further validated the effects of intravenously administrated dex by time-dependent fashion in EAE. Dex postponed clinical signs and motor defects in early stages of EAE. Histological analysis revealed that the degeneration of myelin and axons, as well as the infiltration of peripheral immune cells into the white matter of spinal cord was inhibited by dex in early stages of EAE. Additionally, dex-treatment delayed the neuroinflammatory activation of microglia and astrocytes. Furthermore, this study analyzed the expression of the neurotrophic factor mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) in EAE, and the effect of treatment with dex on MANF-expression. We show that in dex-treated EAE mice expression MANF increased within myelinated areas of spinal cord white matter. We also show that intravenous administration with hMANF in EAE mice improved clinical signs and motor behavior in the early stage of EAE. Our report gives insight to the progression of EAE by providing a time-dependent analysis. Moreover, this study investigates the link between MANF and the EAE model, and shows that MANF is a potential drug candidate for MS.
  • Danilova, Tatiana; Belevich, Ilya; Li, Huini; Palm, Erik; Jokitalo, Eija; Otonkoski, Timo; Lindahl, Maria (2019)
    Global lack of mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotropic factor (MANF) leads to progressive postnatal loss of β-cells mass and insulin-dependent diabetes in mice. Similarly to Manf -/- mice, embryonic ablation of MANF specifically from the pancreas results in diabetes. In this study, we assessed the importance of MANF for the postnatal expansion of the pancreatic β-cell mass and for adult β-cell maintenance in mice. Detailed analysis of Pdx-1Cre +/- ::Manf fl/fl mice revealed mosaic MANF expression in postnatal pancreases and significant correlation between the number of MANF-positive β-cells and β-cell mass in individual mice. In vitro, recombinant MANF induced β-cell proliferation in islets from aged mice and protected from hyperglycemia-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Consequently, excision of MANF from β-cells of adult MIP-1Cre ERT ::Manf fl/fl mice resulted in reduced β-cell mass and diabetes caused largely by β-cell ER stress and apoptosis, possibly accompanied by β-cell de-differentiation and reduced rates of β-cell proliferation. Thus, MANF expression in adult mouse β-cells is needed for their maintenance in vivo. We also revealed a mechanistic link between ER stress, and inflammatory signaling pathways leading to β-cell death in the absence of MANF. Hence, MANF might be a potential target for regenerative therapy in diabetes.
  • Hakonen, Elina; Chandra, Vikash; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Yu, Nancy Yiu-Lin; Ustinov, Jarkko; Katayama, Shintaro; Galli, Emilia; Danilova, Tatiana; Lindholm, Paivi; Vartiainen, Aki; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Krjutskov, Kaarel; Kere, Juha; Saarma, Mart; Lindahl, Maria; Otonkoski, Timo (2018)
    There is a great need to identify factors that could protect pancreatic beta cells against apoptosis or stimulate their replication and thus prevent or reverse the development of diabetes. One potential candidate is mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducible protein. Manf knockout mice used as a model of diabetes develop the condition because of increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation of beta cells, apparently related to ER stress. Given this novel association between MANF and beta cell death, we studied the potential of MANF to protect human beta cells against experimentally induced ER stress. Primary human islets were challenged with proinflammatory cytokines, with or without MANF. Cell viability was analysed and global transcriptomic analysis performed. Results were further validated using the human beta cell line EndoC-beta H1. There was increased expression and secretion of MANF in human beta cells in response to cytokines. Addition of recombinant human MANF reduced cytokine-induced cell death by 38% in human islets (p <0.05). MANF knockdown in EndoC-beta H1 cells led to increased ER stress after cytokine challenge. Mechanistic studies showed that the protective effect of MANF was associated with repression of the NF-kappa B signalling pathway and amelioration of ER stress. MANF also increased the proliferation of primary human beta cells twofold when TGF-beta signalling was inhibited (p <0.01). Our studies show that exogenous MANF protein can provide protection to human beta cells against death induced by inflammatory stress. The antiapoptotic and mitogenic properties of MANF make it a potential therapeutic agent for beta cell protection.
  • Teppo, Jaakko; Vaikkinen, Anu; Stratoulias, Vassilis; Mätlik, Kert; Anttila, Jenni E.; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Pöhö, Päivi; Harvey, Brandon K.; Kostiainen, Risto; Airavaara, Mikko (2020)
    The peri-infarct region after ischemic stroke is the anatomical location for many of the endogenous recovery processes, and the molecular events in the peri-infarct region remain poorly characterized. In this study, we examine the molecular profile of the peri-infarct region on post-stroke day four, time when reparative processes are ongoing. We used a multiomics approach, involving RNA sequencing, and mass spectrometry-based proteomics and metabolomics to characterize molecular changes in the peri-infarct region. We also took advantage of our previously developed method to express transgenes in the peri-infarct region where self-complementary adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors were injected into the brain parenchyma on post-stroke day 2. We have previously used this method to show that mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) enhances functional recovery from stroke and recruits phagocytic cells to the peri-infarct region. Here, we first analyzed the effects of stroke to the peri-infarct region on post-stroke day 4 in comparison to sham-operated animals, finding that stroke induced changes in 3345 transcripts, 341 proteins, and 88 metabolites. We found that after stroke genes related to inflammation, proliferation, apoptosis, and regeneration were upregulated, whereas genes encoding neuroactive ligand receptors and calcium-binding proteins were downregulated. In proteomics, we detected upregulation of proteins related to protein synthesis and downregulation of neuronal proteins. Metabolomic studies indicated that in after stroke tissue there is increase in saccharides, sugar phosphates, ceramides and free fatty acids and decrease of adenine, hypoxantine, adenosine and guanosine. We then compared the effects of post-stroke delivery AAV1-MANF delivery to AAV1-eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein). MANF administration increased the expression of 77 genes, most of which were related to immune response. In proteomics, MANF administration reduced S100A8 and S100A9 protein levels. In metabolomics, no significant differences between MANF and eGFP treatment were detected, but relative to sham surgery group, most of the changes in lipids were significant in the AAV-eGFP group only. This work describes the molecular profile of the peri-infarct region during recovery from ischemic stroke, and establishes a resource for further stroke studies. These results provide further support for parenchymal MANF as a modulator of phagocytic function.
  • Luesch, Hendrik; Paavilainen, Ville O. (2020)
    Covering: up to the end of 2019 Diverse natural product small molecules have allowed critical insights into processes that govern eukaryotic cells' ability to secrete cytosolically synthesized secretory proteins into their surroundings or to insert newly synthesized integral membrane proteins into the lipid bilayer of the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, many components of the endoplasmic reticulum, required for protein homeostasis or other processes such as lipid metabolism or maintenance of calcium homeostasis, are being investigated for their potential in modulating human disease conditions such as cancer, neurodegenerative conditions and diabetes. In this review, we cover recent findings up to the end of 2019 on natural products that influence protein secretion or impact ER protein homeostasis, and serve as powerful chemical tools to understand protein flux through the mammalian secretory pathway and as leads for the discovery of new therapeutics.
  • UK10K Consortium; Yang, Yongjie; van der Klaauw, Agatha A.; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Palotie, Aarno; Paunio, Tiina; Pietilainen, Olli; Suvisaari, Jaana (2019)
    Hypothalamic neurons expressing the anorectic peptide Pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) regulate food intake and body weight. Here, we show that Steroid Receptor Coactivator-1 (SRC-1) interacts with a target of leptin receptor activation, phosphorylated STAT3, to potentiate Pomc transcription. Deletion of SRC-1 in Pomc neurons in mice attenuates their depolarization by leptin, decreases Pomc expression and increases food intake leading to high-fat diet-induced obesity. In humans, fifteen rare heterozygous variants in SRC-1 found in severely obese individuals impair leptin-mediated Pomc reporter activity in cells, whilst four variants found in non-obese controls do not. In a knock-in mouse model of a loss of function human variant (SRC-1L1376P), leptin-induced depolarization of Pomc neurons and Pomc expression are significantly reduced, and food intake and body weight are increased. In summary, we demonstrate that SRC-1 modulates the function of hypothalamic Pomc neurons, and suggest that targeting SRC-1 may represent a useful therapeutic strategy for weight loss.
  • De Franco, Elisa; Lytrivi, Maria; Ibrahim, Hazem; Montaser, Hossam; Wakeling, Matthew N.; Fantuzzi, Federica; Patel, Kashyap; Demarez, Celine; Cai, Ying; Igoillo-Esteve, Mariana; Cosentino, Cristina; Lithovius, Väinö; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Laver, Thomas W.; Johnson, Matthew B.; Sawatani, Toshiaki; Shakeri, Hadis; Pachera, Nathalie; Haliloglu, Belma; Ozbek, Mehmet Nuri; Unal, Edip; Yildirim, Ruken; Godbole, Tushar; Yildiz, Melek; Aydin, Banu; Bilheu, Angeline; Suzuki, Ikuo; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Senee, Valerie; Julier, Cecile; Marchetti, Piero; Eizirik, Decio L.; Ellard, Sian; Saarimäki-Vire, Jonna; Otonkoski, Timo; Cnop, Miriam; Hattersley, Andrew T. (2020)
    Neonatal diabetes is caused by single gene mutations reducing pancreatic pcell number or impairing beta cell function. Understanding the genetic basis of rare diabetes subtypes highlights fundamental biological processes in beta cells. We identified 6 patients from 5 families with homozygous mutations in the MPS gene, which is involved in trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi. All patients had neonatal/early-onset diabetes, severe microcephaly, and epilepsy. YIPF5 is expressed during human brain development, in adult brain and pancreatic islets. We used 3 human beta cell models (YIPF5 silencing in EndoC-beta H1 cells, YIPF5 knockout and mutation knockin in embryonic stem cells, and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells) to investigate the mechanism through which YIPF5 loss of function affects beta cells. Loss of YIPF5 function in stem cell-derived islet cells resulted in proinsulin retention in the ER, marked ER stress, and beta cell failure. Partial YIPF5 silencing in EndoC-beta H1 cells and a patient mutation in stem cells increased the beta cell sensitivity to ER stress-induced apoptosis. We report recessive YIPF5 mutations as the genetic cause of a congenital syndrome of microcephaly, epilepsy, and neonatal/early-onset diabetes, highlighting a critical role of YIPF5 in beta cells and neurons. We believe this is the first report of mutations disrupting the ER-to-Golgi trafficking, resulting in diabetes.