Browsing by Subject "EUROPEAN-SOCIETY"

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  • Mikkola, Ilona; Hagnäs, Maria; Hartsenko, Jelena; Kaila, Minna; Winell, Klas (2020)
    Aims To investigate whether the use of a personalized care plan is associated with clinical outcomes of type 2 diabetes (T2D) treatment in real-world. Methods Quality of treatment was assessed using data from a yearly sample of patients with T2D visiting primary care health centres in 2012–2016. Patients were divided into three groups: 1) patient has a copy of their personalized care plan, 2) care plan exists in the patient record only or 3) patient has no care plan. Data on smoking, laboratory tests, systolic blood pressure (sBP) and statin use were collected. We compared the outcomes between the three groups in terms of proportions of patients achieving the clinical targets recommended by international guidelines. Results Evaluable data were available for 10,403 patients. Of these, 1,711 (16%) had a copy of their personalized care plan, and 3,623 (35%) had no care plan. Those who had a copy of their care plan were significantly more likely than those without to achieve the sBP target (odds ratio [OR] 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29–1.51, p
  • Cerlinskaite, Kamile; Javanainen, Tuija; Cinotti, Raphael; Mebazaa, Alexandre (2018)
    Acute heart failure (AHF) is a life-threatening medical condition, where urgent diagnostic and treatment methods are of key importance. However, there are few evidence-based treatment methods. Interestingly, despite relatively similar ways of management of AHF throughout the globe, mid-term outcome in East Asia, including South Korea is more favorable than in Europe. Yet, most of the treatment methods are symptomatic. The cornerstone of AHF management is identifying precipitating factors and specific phenotype. Multidisciplinary approach is important in AHF, which can be caused or aggravated by both cardiac and non-cardiac causes. The main pathophysiological mechanism in AHF is congestion, both systemic and inside the organs (lung, kidney, or liver). Cardiac output is often preserved in AHF except in a few cases of advanced heart failure. This paper provides guidance on AHF management in a time-based approach. Treatment strategies, criteria for triage, admission to hospital and discharge are described.
  • Tolppanen, Heli; Rivas-Lasarte, Mercedes; Lassus, Johan; Sans-Rosello, Jordi; Hartmann, Oliver; Lindholm, Matias; Arrigo, Mattia; Tarvasmäki, Tuukka; Kober, Lars; Thiele, Holger; Pulkki, Kari; Spinar, Jindrich; Parissis, John; Banaszewski, Marek; Silva-Cardoso, Jose; Carubelli, Valentina; Sionis, Alessandro; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Mebazaa, Alexandre (2017)
    Background: The clinical CardShock risk score, including baseline lactate levels, was recently shown to facilitate risk stratification in patients with cardiogenic shock (CS). As based on baseline parameters, however, it may not reflect the change in mortality risk in response to initial therapies. Adrenomedullin is a prognostic biomarker in several cardiovascular diseases and was recently shown to associate with hemodynamic instability in patients with septic shock. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic value and association with hemodynamic parameters of bioactive adrenomedullin (bio-ADM) in patients with CS. Methods: CardShock was a prospective, observational, European multinational cohort study of CS. In this sub-analysis, serial plasma bio-ADM and arterial blood lactate measurements were collected from 178 patients during the first 10 days after detection of CS. Results: Both bio-ADM and lactate were higher in 90-day non-survivors compared to survivors at all time points (P <0.05 for all). Lactate showed good prognostic value during the initial 24 h (AUC 0.78 at admission and 0.76 at 24 h). Subsequently, lactate returned normal ( 55.7 pg/mL) at 48 h compared to those with low bio-ADM levels (49.1 vs. 22.6%, P = 0.001). High levels of bio-ADM were associated with impaired cardiac index, mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and systolic pulmonary artery pressure during the study period. Furthermore, high levels of bio-ADM at 48 to 96 h were related to persistently impaired cardiac and end-organ function. Conclusions: Bio-ADM is a valuable prognosticator and marker of impaired hemodynamics in CS patients. High levels of bio-ADM may show shock refractoriness and developing end-organ dysfunction and thus help to guide therapeutic approach in patients with CS.
  • Garderet, Laurent; Ziagkos, Dimitris; Van Biezen, Anja; Iacobelli, Simona; Finke, Juergen; Maertens, Johan; Volin, Liisa; Ljungman, Per; Chevallier, Patrice; Passweg, Jakob; Schaap, Nicolaas; Beelen, Dietrich; Nagler, Arnon; Blaise, Didier; Poire, Xavier; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Lenhoff, Stig; Craddock, Charles; Schots, Rik; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Sanz, Jaime; Jindra, Pavel; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Robin, Marie; Kroeger, Nicolaus (2018)
    The deletion (5q) karyotype (del [5q]) in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is the most common karyotypic abnormality in de novo MDS. An increased number of blasts and additional karyotypic abnormalities (del [al]+) are associated with a poor outcome. We analyzed the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT) in patients suffering from MDS with only del (5q) or del (5q)+. A total of 162 patients, of median age 54 years (range, 9 to 73), having MDS and del (5q) abnormalities received HCT from identical siblings (n = 87) or unrelated donors (n = 75). The cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality and relapse incidence at 4 years was 29% (95% CI, 22 to 36) and 46% (95% CI, 38 to 54), whereas the estimated 4 year survival, relapse-free and overall, was 25% (95% CI, 18 to 33) and 30% (95% CI, 23 to 38), respectively. In a multivariate analysis patients with del (5q) and a blast excess displayed poorer survival (hazard ratio, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.44 to 3.93; P
  • Finndiane Study Grp (2018)
    Aims/hypothesis This study aimed to assess the use of ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) to identify the presence of masked, nocturnal and white-coat hypertension in individuals with type 1 diabetes, patterns that could not be detected by regular office-based BP monitoring alone. We also analysed associations between BP patterns and arterial stiffness in order to identify individuals at cardiovascular risk. Methods This substudy included 140 individuals with type 1 diabetes from the Helsinki metropolitan area, who attended the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study (FinnDiane) Centre in Helsinki between January 2013 and August 2017. Twenty-four hour ABPM and pulse wave analysis were performed simultaneously using a validated non-invasive brachial oscillometric device (Mobil-O-Graph). Definitions of hypertension were based on the European Society of Hypertension guidelines. Masked hypertension was defined as normal office BP (BP obtained using a standardised automated BP device) but elevated 24 h ABPM, and white-coat hypertension as elevated office BP but normal 24 h ABPM. Results A total of 38% of individuals were normotensive and 33% had sustained hypertension, while 23% had masked and 6% had white-coat hypertension. About half of the cohort had increased absolute levels of night-time BP, half of whom were untreated. In the ambulatory setting, central BP and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were higher in participants with masked hypertension than in those with normotension (p <0.001). In a multivariable linear regression model adjusted for age, sex, BMI, antihypertensive treatment and eGFR, masked hypertension was independently associated with higher 24 h PWV ((3 0.50 [95% CI 0.34, 0.66]), but not with PWV obtained during resting conditions (adjusted 13 0.28 [95% CI -0.53, 1.10]), using normotension as the reference group. Conclusions/interpretation ABPM analysis revealed that one-quarter of the participants with type 1 diabetes had masked hypertension; these individuals would not have been detected by office BP alone. Moreover, arterial stiffness was increased in individuals with masked hypertension. These findings support the use of ABPM to identify individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • van Gelder, Michel; Ziagkos, Dimitris; de Wreede, Liesbeth; van Biezen, Anja; Dreger, Peter; Gramatzki, Martin; Stelljes, Matthias; Andersen, Niels Smedegaard; Schaap, Nicolaas; Vitek, Antonin; Beelen, Dietrich; Lindstrom, Vesa; Finke, Juergen; Passweg, Jacob; Eder, Matthias; Machaczka, Maciej; Delgado, Julio; Krueger, William; Raida, Ludek; Socie, Gerard; Jindra, Pavel; Afanasyev, Boris; Wagner, Eva; Chalandon, Yves; Henseler, Anja; Schoenland, Stefan; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Schetelig, Johannes; CLL Subcomm Chronic Malignancies W; European Soc Blood Marrow Transpla (2017)
    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia with del(17p) or del(11q) have poor long-term prognosis with targeted therapies. Conversely, this retrospective European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation registry study shows that young high cytogenetic risk responsive patients with human leukocyte antigen-matched donors have a high 8-year progression-free survival and low 2-year non-relapse mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This treatment then may compare favorably with targeted therapies for younger high cytogenetic risk patients. Background: Patients with genetically high-risk relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia have shorter median progression-free survival (PFS) with kinase-and BCL2-inhibitors (KI, BCL2i). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) may result in sustained PFS, especially in younger patients because of its age-dependent non-relapse mortality (NRM) risk, but outcome data are lacking for this population. Patients and Methods: Risk factors for 2-year NRM and 8-year PFS were identified in patients <50 years in an updated European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation registry cohort (n = 197; median follow-up, 90.4 months) by Cox regression modeling, and predicted probabilities of NRM and PFS of 2 reference patients with favorable or unfavorable characteristics were plotted. Results: Predictors for poor 8-year PFS were no remission at the time of alloHCT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.5) and partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched unrelated donor (HR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5-5.2). The latter variable also predicted a higher risk of 2-year NRM (HR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.4-11.6) compared with HLA-matched sibling donors. Predicted 2-year NRM and 8-year PFS of a high cytogenetic risk (del(17p) and/or del(11q)) patient in remission with a matched related donor were 12% (95% CI, 3%-22%) and 54% (95% CI, 38%-69%), and for an unresponsive patient with a female partially HLA-matched unrelated donor 37% (95% CI, 12%-62%) and 38% (95% CI, 13%-63%). Conclusion: Low predicted NRM and high 8-year PFS in favorable transplant high cytogenetic risk patients compares favorably with outcomes with KI or BCL2i. Taking into account the amount of uncertainty for predicting survival after alloHCT and after sequential administration of KI and BCL2i, alloHCT remains a valid option for younger patients with high cytogenetic risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia with a well-HLA-matched donor. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Grip, Olivia; Mani, Kevin; Altreuther, Martin; Goncalves, Frederico Bastos; Beiles, Barry; Cassar, Kevin; Davidovic, Lazar; Eldrup, Nikolaj; Lattmann, Thomas; Laxdal, Elin; Menyhei, Gabor; Setacci, Carlo; Settembre, Nicla; Thomson, Ian; Venermo, Maarit; Björck, Martin (2020)
    Objective: Popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) is the second most common arterial aneurysm. Vascunet is an international collaboration of vascular registries. The aim was to study treatment and outcomes. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively registered population based data. Fourteen countries contributed data (Australia, Denmark, Finland, France, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Malta, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Serbia, Sweden, and Switzerland). Results: During 2012-2018, data from 10 764 PAA repairs were included. Mean values with between countries ranges in parenthesis are given. The incidence was 10.4 cases/million inhabitants/year (2.4-19.3). The mean age was 71.3 years (66.8-75.3). Most patients, 93.3%, were men and 40.0% were active smokers. The operations were elective in 73.2% (60.0%-85.7%). The mean pre-operative PAA diameter was 32.1 mm (27.3-38.3 mm). Open surgery dominated in both elective (79.5%) and acute (83.2%) cases. A medial surgical approach was used in 77.7%, and posterior in 22.3%. Vein grafts were used in 63.8%. Of the emergency procedures, 91% (n = 2 169, 20.2% of all) were for acute thrombosis and 9% for rupture (n = 236, 2.2% of all). Thrombosis patients had larger aneurysms, mean diameter 35.5 mm, and 46.3% were active smokers. Early amputation and death were higher after acute presentation than after elective surgery (5.0% vs. 0.7%; 1.9% vs. 0.5%). This pattern remained one year after surgery (8.5% vs. 1.0%; 6.1% vs. 1.4%). Elective open compared with endovascular surgery had similar one year amputation rates (1.2% vs. 0.2%; p = .095) but superior patency (84.0% vs. 78.4%; p = .005). Veins had higher patency and lower amputation rates, at one year compared with synthetic grafts (86.8% vs. 72.3%; 1.8% vs. 5.2%; both p <.001). The posterior open approach had a lower amputation rate (0.0% vs. 1.6%, p = .009) than the medial approach. Conclusion: Patients presenting with acute ischaemia had high risk of amputation. The frequent use of endovascular repair and prosthetic grafts should be reconsidered based on these results.
  • Casar-Borota, Olivera; Boldt, Henning Bünsow; Engstrom, Britt Eden; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Baussart, Bertrand; Bengtsson, Daniel; Berinder, Katarina; Ekman, Bertil; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Hoybye, Charlotte; Jorgensen, Jens Otto L.; Kolnes, Anders Jensen; Korbonits, Marta; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh; Lindsay, John R.; Loughrey, Paul Benjamin; Maiter, Dominique; Manojlovic-Gacic, Emilija; Pahnke, Jens; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Popovic, Vera; Ragnarsson, Oskar; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Scheie, David; Toth, Miklos; Villa, Chiara; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Kunicki, Jacek; Burman, Pia (2021)
    Context: Aggressive pituitary tumors (APTs) are characterized by unusually rapid growth and lack of response to standard treatment. About 1% to 2% develop metastases being classified as pituitary carcinomas (PCs). For unknown reasons, the corticotroph tumors are overrepresented among APTs and PCs. Mutations in the alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) gene, regulating chromatin remodeling and telomere maintenance, have been implicated in the development of several cancer types, including neuroendocrine tumors. Objective: To study ATRX protein expression and mutational status of the ATRX gene in APTs and PCs. Design: We investigated ATRX protein expression by using immunohistochemistry in 30 APTs and 18 PCs, mostly of Pit-1 and T-Pit cell lineage. In tumors lacking ATRX immunolabeling, mutational status of the ATRX gene was explored. Results: Nine of the 48 tumors (19%) demonstrated lack of ATRX immunolabelling with a higher proportion in patients with PCs (5/18; 28%) than in those with APTs (4/30;13%). Lack of ATRX was most common in the corticotroph tumors, 7/22 (32%), versus tumors of the Pit-1 lineage, 2/24 (8%). Loss-of-function ATRX mutations were found in all 9 ATRX immunonegative cases: nonsense mutations (n = 4), frameshift deletions (n = 4), and large deletions affecting 22-28 of the 36 exons (n = 3). More than 1 ATRX gene defect was identified in 2 PCs. Conclusion: ATRX mutations occur in a subset of APTs and are more common in corticotroph tumors. The findings provide a rationale for performing ATRX immunohistochemistry to identify patients at risk of developing aggressive and potentially metastatic pituitary tumors.
  • HoT-PE Investigators; Barco, Stefano; Schmidtmann, Irene; Ageno, Walter; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Lankeit, Mareike (2020)
    Aims To investigate the efficacy and safety of early transition from hospital to ambulatory treatment in low-risk acute PE, using the oral factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban. Methods and results We conducted a prospective multicentre single-arm investigator initiated and academically sponsored management trial in patients with acute low-risk PE (EudraCT Identifier 2013-001657-28). Eligibility criteria included absence of (i) haemodynamic instability, (ii) right ventricular dysfunction or intracardiac thrombi, and (iii) serious comorbidities. Up to two nights of hospital stay were permitted. Rivaroxaban was given at the approved dose for PE for >= 3 months. The primary outcome was symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) or PE-related death within 3 months of enrolment. An interim analysis was planned after the first 525 patients, with prespecified early termination of the study if the null hypothesis could be rejected at the level of alpha = 0.004 ( Conclusion Early discharge and home treatment with rivaroxaban is effective and safe in carefully selected patients with acute low-risk PE. The results of the present trial support the selection of appropriate patients for ambulatory treatment of PE.
  • Beets, Geerard; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Andritsch, Elisabeth; Arnold, Dirk; Beishon, Marc; Crul, Mirjam; Dekker, Jan Willem; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Flejou, Jean-Francois; Grisold, Wolfgang; Henning, Geoffrey; Laghi, Andrea; Lovey, Jozsef; Negrouk, Anastassia; Pereira, Philippe; Roca, Pierre; Saarto, Tiina; Seufferlein, Thomas; Taylor, Claire; Ugolini, Giampaolo; van de Velde, Cornelis; van Herck, Bert; Yared, Wendy; Costa, Alberto; Naredi, Peter (2017)
    Background: ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care (ERQCC) are checklists and explanations of organisation and actions that are necessary to give high-quality care to patients who have a specific tumour type. They are written by European experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care. ERQCC papers give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of the elements needed in any healthcare system to provide high quality of care throughout the patient journey. References are made to clinical guidelines and other resources where appropriate, and the focus is on care in Europe. Colorectal cancer: essential requirements for quality care Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer death in Europe and has wide variation in outcomes among countries. Increasing numbers of older people are contracting the disease, and treatments for advanced stages are becoming more complex. A growing number of survivors also require specialist support. High-quality care can only be a carried out in specialised CRC units or centres which have both a core multidisciplinary team and an extended team of allied professionals, and which are subject to quality and audit procedures. Such units or centres are far from universal in all European countries. It is essential that, to meet European aspirations for comprehensive cancer control, healthcare organisations implement the essential requirements in this paper, paying particular attention to multidisciplinarity and patient-centred pathways from diagnosis, to treatment, to survivorship. Conclusion: Taken together, the information presented in this paper provides a comprehensive description of the essential requirements for establishing a high-quality CRC service. The ECCO expert group is aware that it is not possible to propose a 'one size fits all' system for all countries, but urges that access to multidisciplinary units or centres must be guaranteed for all those with CRC. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • Allum, William; Lordick, Florian; Alsina, Maria; Andritsch, Elisabeth; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed; Beishon, Marc; Braga, Marco; Caballero, Carmela; Carneiro, Fatima; Cassinello, Fernando; Dekker, Jan Willem; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Haustermans, Karin; Henning, Geoffrey; Hutter, Bettina; Lovey, Jozsef; Netikova, Irena Stenglova; Oberrnannova, Radka; Oberst, Simon; Rostoft, Siri; Saarto, Tiina; Seufferlein, Thomas; Sheth, Sapna; Wynter-Blyth, Venetia; Costa, Alberto; Naredi, Peter Z. (2018)
    Background: ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care (ERQCC) are checklists and explanations of organisation and actions that are necessary to give high-quality care to patients who have a specific type of cancer. They are written by European experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care. ERQCC papers give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of the elements needed in any healthcare system to provide high quality of care throughout the patient journey. References are made to clinical guidelines and other resources where appropriate, and the focus is on care in Europe. Oesophageal and gastric: essential requirements for quality care: Oesophageal and gastric (OG) cancers are a challenging tumour group with a poor prognosis and wide variation in outcomes among European countries. Increasing numbers of older people are contracting the diseases, and treatments and care pathways are becoming more complex in both curative and palliative settings. High-quality care can only be a carried out in specialised OG cancer units or centres which have both a core multidisciplinary team and an extended team of allied professionals, and which are subject to quality and audit procedures. Such units or centres are far from universal in all European countries. It is essential that, to meet European aspirations for comprehensive cancer control, healthcare organisations implement the essential requirements in this paper, paying particular attention to multidisciplinarity and patient-centred pathways from diagnosis, to treatment, to survivorship. Conclusion: Taken together, the information presented in this paper provides a comprehensive description of the essential requirements for establishing a high-quality OG cancer service. The ERQCC expert group is aware that it is not possible to propose a one size fits all' system for all countries, but urges that access to multidisciplinary units or centres must be guaranteed for all those with OG cancer.
  • EORP Cardiomyopathy Registry Inves; Heliö, Tiina; Elliott, Perry; Koskenvuo, Juha W.; Charron, Philippe (2020)
    Aims Cardiomyopathies comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases, often of genetic origin. We assessed the current practice of genetic counselling and testing in the prospective European Society of Cardiology EURObservational Research Programme Cardiomyopathy Registry. Methods and results A total of 3208 adult patients from 69 centres in 18 countries were enrolled. Genetic counselling was performed in 60.8% of all patients [75.4% in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 39.2% in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), 70.8% in arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and 49.2% in restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM),P <0.001]. Comparing European geographical areas, genetic counselling was performed from 42.4% to 83.3% (P <0.001). It was provided by a cardiologist (85.3%), geneticist (15.1%), genetic counsellor (11.3%), or a nurse (7.5%) (P <0.001). Genetic testing was performed in 37.3% of all patients (48.8% in HCM, 18.6% in DCM, 55.6% in ARVC, and 43.6% in RCM,P <0.001). Index patients with genetic testing were younger at diagnosis and had more familial disease, family history of sudden cardiac death, or implanted cardioverter defibrillators but less co-morbidities than those not tested (P <0.001 for each comparison). At least one disease-causing variant was found in 41.7% of index patients with genetic testing (43.3% in HCM, 33.3% in DCM, 51.4% in ARVC, and 42.9% in RCM,P = 0.13). Conclusions This is the first detailed report on the real-life practice of genetic counselling and testing in cardiomyopathies in Europe. Genetic counselling and testing were performed in a substantial proportion of patients but less often than recommended by European guidelines and much less in DCM than in HCM and ARVC, despite evidence for genetic background.
  • Saarinen, Sini; Salo, Ari; Boyd, James; Laukkanen-Nevala, Päivi; Silfvast, Catharina; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Silfvast, Tom (2018)
    Patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) with pulseless electrical activity (PEA) as initial cardiac rhythm are not always treated in intensive care units (ICUs): some are admitted to high dependency units with various level of care, others to ordinary wards. Aim of this study was to describe the factors determining level of hospital care after OHCA with PEA, post-resuscitation care and survival. Adult OHCA patients with PEA (n = 221), who were resuscitated in southern Finland between 2010 and 2013 were included, provided patient survived to hospital admission. The patients were divided into four groups according to the level of hospital care provided: ordinary ward and Level 1-3 ICUs. Differences in patient characteristics, post-resuscitation care and survival were compared between the groups. Most patients (62.4%) were treated at Level 2 ICUs. Longer time to ROSC and advanced age decreased admission rate to Level 2 or 3 post-resuscitation care, whereas good pre-arrest CPC (1-2) increased the admission rate to Level 2/3 ICUs independently. Treatment with targeted temperature management (TTM) (4.1%) or early coronary angiography (3.2%) were very rare. Prognostic decisions were made earlier in the lower treatment intensity groups (p <0.01). One-year survival rate was 24.0, 17.1% survived with good neurological outcome. Neurological outcome was better with more intensive care. After adjustment, level of care was not independent predictor for outcome: only return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) time, cardiac arrest cause and pre-arrest performance affected independently to 1-year survival, age and ROSC for neurologic outcome. PEA are usually admitted to Level 2 ICUs for post-resuscitation care in the capital area of Finland. Age, ROSC and pre-arrest CPC were independent predictors for level of post-resuscitation care. TTM and early CAG were rare and provided only for Level 3 ICU patients. Prognostication was earlier in lower level of care units. Good neurologic survival was more common with more intensive level of post-resuscitation care. After adjustment, level of care was not independent predictor for survival or neurologic outcome: only ROSC, cardiac arrest cause and pre-arrest performance predicted 1-year survival; age and ROSC neurologic outcome.
  • Kiss, Boldizsar; Fekete-Györ, Alexandra; Szakal-Toth, Zsofia; Parkanyi, Anna; Jenei, Zsigmond; Nyeki, Peter; Becker, David; Molnar, Levente; Ruzsa, Zoltan; Der, Gabor; Kovacs, Enikö; Pilecky, David; Geller, Laszlo; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Merkely, Bela; Zima, Endre (2021)
    Introduction: Sudden cardiac death is one of the most significant cardiovascular causes of death worldwide. Although there have been immense methodological and technical advances in the field of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and following intensive care in the last decade, currently there are only a few validated risk-stratification scoring systems for the quick and reliable estimation of the mortality risk of these patients at the time of admission to the intensive care unit. Objective: Our aim was to correlate the mortality prediction risk points calculated by CardShock Risk Score (CSRS) and modified (m) CSRS based on the admission data of the post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS) patients. Methods: The medical records of 172 out-of-hospital resuscitated cardiac arrest patients, who were admitted at the Heart and Vascular Centre of Semmelweis University, were screened retrospectively. Out of the 172 selected patients, 123 were eligible for inclusion to calculate CSRS and mCSRS. Based on CSRS score, we generated three different groups of patients, with scores 1 to 3, 4 to 6, and 7+, respectively. Mortality data of the groups were compared by log-rank test. Results: Mean age of the patients was 63.6 years (69% male), the cause of sudden cardiac death was acut coronary syndrome in 80% of the cases. The early and late mortality was predicted by neurological status, serum lactate level, renal function, initial rhythm, and the need of catecholamines. Using mCSRS, a significant survival difference was proven in between the groups "1-3" vs "4-6" (p Conclusion: Compared to the CSRS, the mCSRS expanded with the 2 additional weighting points differentiates more specifically the low-moderate and high survival groups in the PCAS patient population treated in our institute.
  • Mellembakken, Jan Roar; Mahmoudan, Azita; Morkrid, Lars; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Morin-Papunen, Laure; Tapanainen, Juha S.; Piltonen, Terhi T.; Hirschberg, Angelica Linden; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Vanky, Eszter; Ravn, Pernille; Jensen, Richard Christian; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Glintborg, Dorte (2021)
    Objective: Obesity is considered to be the strongest predictive factor for cardio-metabolic risk in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The aim of the study was to compare blood pressure (BP) in normal weight women with PCOS and controls matched for age and BMI. Methods: From a Nordic cross-sectional base of 2615 individuals of Nordic ethnicity, we studied a sub cohort of 793 normal weight women with BMI <25 k g/m(2) (512 women with PCOS according to Rotterdam criteria and 281 age and BMI-matched controls). Participants underwent measurement of BP and body composition (BMI, waist-hip ratio), lipid status, and fasting BG. Data were presented as median (quartiles). Results: The median age for women with PCOS were 28 (25, 32) years and median BMI was 22.2 (20.7, 23.4) kg/m(2). Systolic BP was 118 (109, 128) mmHg in women with PCOS compared to 110 (105, 120) mmHg in controls and diastolic BP was 74 ( 67, 81) vs 70 (64, 75) mmHg, both P <0.001. The prevalence of women with BP >= 140/90 mmHg was 11.1% (57/ 512) in women with PCOS vs 1.8% (5/281) in controls, P <0.001. In women >= 35 years the prevalence of BP >= 140/90 mmHg was comparable in women with PCOS and controls (12.7% vs 9.8%, P = 0.6). Using multiple regression analyses, the strongest association with BP was found for age, waist circumference, and total cholesterol in women with PCOS. Conclusions: Normal weight women with PCOS have higher BP than controls. BP and metabolic screening are relevant also in young normal weight women with PCOS.
  • Giebel, Sebastian; Labopin, Myriam; Czerw, Tomasz; Socie, Gerard; Blaise, Didier; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Passweg, Jacob; Ljungman, Per; Poire, Xavier; Chevallier, Patrice; Remenyi, Peter; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Anafasyev, Boris; Fegueux, Nathalie; Rovira, Montserrat; Itälä-Remes, Maija; Bornhaeuser, Martin; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon (2019)
    Background: Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) is widely used to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (alloPBSCT). The goal of this study was to retrospectively assess the effect of ATG on outcomes in the setting of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (Ph+ ALL). Methods: In the analysis, 1170 adult patients undergoing alloPBSCT from human leucocyte antigen-matched sibling or unrelated donors in the first complete remission between 2007 and 2016 were included. ATG was used in 429/575 (75%) and 121/595 (20%) patients transplanted from unrelated or sibling donors, respectively. Results: The incidence of chronic GVHD was 35% for patients treated with ATG compared with 52% in those not receiving ATG (p <0.001), while the rate of extensive chronic GVHD was 16% and 36%, respectively (p <0.001). The probability of survival free from GVHD and relapse (GRFS) was 42% and 32%, respectively (p = 0.002). In a multivariate model, the use of ATG was associated with reduced risk of overall chronic GVHD (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.52, p <0.001) and extensive chronic GVHD (HR = 0.46, p <0.001). It was also associated with better GRFS (HR = 0.77, p = 0.007), despite increased risk of relapse (HR = 1.41, p = 0.02). No significant effect was found with regard to the risk of non-relapse mortality and overall mortality. Conclusions: The use of ATG for patients with Ph+ ALL undergoing alloPBSCT is associated with reduced risk of chronic GVHD without impact on survival and therefore, could be considered. However, increased risk of relapse suggests the need for strict monitoring of minimal residual diseases and appropriate interventions after transplantation. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Miro, Oscar; Gil, Victor; Xipell, Carolina; Sanchez, Carolina; Aguilo, Sira; Martin-Sanchez, Francisco J.; Herrero, Pablo; Jacob, Javier; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Llorens, Pere; ICA-SEMES Res Grp (2017)
    Objective To define the short-and mid-term outcomes of patients discharged after an episode of acute-decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and evaluate the differences between patients discharged directly from the emergency department (ED) and those discharged after hospitalization. Methods We performed a prospective, multicenter, cohort-designed study, including consecutive patients diagnosed with ADHF in 27 Spanish EDs. Thirty-four variables on epidemiology, comorbidity, baseline status, vital signs, signs of congestion, laboratory tests, and treatment were collected in every patient. The primary outcome was a combined endpoint of ED revisit (without hospitalization) or hospitalization due to ADHF, or all-cause death. Secondary outcomes were each of these three events individually. Outcomes were obtained by survival analysis at different timepoints in the entire cohort, and crude and adjusted comparisons were carried out between patients discharged directly from the ED and after hospitalization. Results Of the 3233 patients diagnosed with ADHF during a 2-month period, we analyzed 2986 patients discharged alive: 787 (26.4%) discharged from the ED and 2199 (73.6%) after hospitalization. The cumulative percentages of events for the whole cohort (at 7/30/180 days) for the combined endpoint were 7.8/24.7/57.8; for ED revisit 2.5/9.4/25.5; for hospitalization 4.6/15.3/40.7; and for death 0.9/4.3/16.8. After adjustment for patient profile and center, significant increases were found in the hazard ratios for ED-compared to hospital-discharged patients in the combined endpoint, ED revisit and hospitalization, being higher at short-term [at 7 days, 2.373 (1.678-3.355), 2.069 (1.188-3.602), and 3.071 (1.915-4.922), respectively] than at mid-term [at 180 days, 1.368 (1.160-1.614), 1.642 (1.265-2.132), and 1.302 (1.044-1.623), respectively]. No significant differences were found in death. Conclusions Patients with ADHF discharged from the ED have worse outcomes, especially at short term, than those discharged after hospitalization. The definition and implementation of effective strategies to improve patient selection for direct ED discharge are needed.
  • Kivelä, Laura; Hekkala, Sointu; Huhtala, Heini; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle (2020)
    Background Follow-up of coeliac disease is recommended to prevent complications associated with unsuccessful treatment. Objective The objective of this article is to evaluate the implementation and significance of long-term follow-up. Methods Medical data were collected from 585 and follow-up questionnaires sent to 559 current adult coeliac disease patients diagnosed in childhood. Diagnostic features and adulthood health outcomes were compared between those with and without adulthood follow-up. Results Of paediatric patients, 92% were followed up 6-24 months after diagnosis. A total of 235 adults responded to the questionnaires a median of 18 years after diagnosis, and 25% of them reported regular follow-up. They were diagnosed more recently than those without follow-up (median year 2001 vs 1995, p = 0.001), being otherwise comparable at diagnosis. Those with follow-up were less often smokers (5% vs 16%, p = 0.042) and relatives of coeliac patients (48% vs 66%, p = 0.018), and more often students (48% vs 28%, p = 0.005) and type 1 diabetics (19% vs 4%, p = 0.001). Lack of follow-up was not associated with complications, ongoing symptoms, poorer general health or dietary adherence. All completely non-adherent patients were without follow-up. Conclusions Most coeliac disease patients diagnosed in childhood were not followed up according to recommendations in adulthood. The individual effect of this on long-term treatment outcomes varied markedly.
  • Altenberger, Johann; Gustafsson, Finn; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Karason, Kristjan; Kindgen-Milles, Detlef; Kivikko, Matti; Malfatto, Gabriella; Papp, Zoltan; Parissis, John; Pollesello, Piero; Pölzl, Gerhard; Tschöpe, Carsten (2018)
    The use of inotropes for correcting hemodynamic dysfunction in patients with congestive heart failure has been described over many decades. However, negative or insufficient data have been collected regarding the effects of cardiac glycosides, catecholamines, and phosphodiesterase inhibitors on quality of life and survival. More recently, the calcium sensitizer and potassium channel-opener levosimendan has been proposed as a safer inodilator than traditional agents in some heart failure settings, such as advanced heart failure. At the 2017 annual congress of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology (Paris, April 30-May 2), a series of tutorials delivered by lecturers from 8 European countries examined how to use levosimendan safely and effectively in acute and advanced heart failure. The proceedings of those tutorials have been collated in this review to provide an expert perspective on the optimized use of levosimendan in those settings.
  • Haraldsson, Erik; Kylänpää, Leena; Grönroos, Juha; Saarela, Arto; Toth, Ervin; Qvigstad, Gunnar; Hult, Mari; Lindström, Outi; Laine, Simo; Karjula, Heikki; Hauge, Truls; Sadik, Riadh; Arnelo, Urban (2019)
    Background and Aims: Certain appearances of the major duodenal papilla have been claimed to make cannulation more difficult during ERCP. This study uses a validated classification of the endoscopic appearance of the major duodenal papilla to determine if certain types of papilla predispose to difficult cannulation. Methods: Patients with a naive papilla scheduled for ERCP were included. The papilla was classified into 1 of 4 papilla types before cannulation started. Time to successful bile duct cannulation, attempts, and number of pancreatic duct passages were recorded. Difficult cannulation was defined as after 5 minutes, 5 attempts, or 2 pancreatic guidewire passages. Results: A total of 1401 patients were included from 9 different centers in the Nordic countries. The overall frequency of difficult cannulation was 42% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39%-44%). Type 2 small papilla (52%; 95% CI, 45%-59%) and type 3 protruding or pendulous papilla (48%; 95% CI, 42%-53%) were more frequently difficult to cannulate compared with type 1 regular papilla (36%; 95% CI, 33%-40%; both P <.001). If an inexperienced endoscopist started cannulation, the frequency of failed cannulation increased from 1.9% to 6.3% (P <.0001), even though they were replaced by a senior endoscopist after 5 minutes. Conclusions: The endoscopic appearance of the major duodenal papilla influences bile duct cannulation. Small type 2 and protruding or pendulous type 3 papillae are more frequently difficult to cannulate. In addition, cannulation might even fail more frequently if a beginner starts cannulation. These findings should be taken into consideration when performing studies regarding bile duct cannulation and in training future generations of endoscopists.