Browsing by Subject "EUROPEAN-UNION"

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  • ARIA Working Grp; Bousquet, J; Pfaar, O; Togias, A; Haahtela, T; Toppila-Salmi, S (2019)
    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is a proven therapeutic option for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and/or asthma. Many guidelines or national practice guidelines have been produced but the evidence-based method varies, many are complex and none propose care pathways. This paper reviews care pathways for AIT using strict criteria and provides simple recommendations that can be used by all stakeholders including healthcare professionals. The decision to prescribe AIT for the patient should be individualized and based on the relevance of the allergens, the persistence of symptoms despite appropriate medications according to guidelines as well as the availability of good-quality and efficacious extracts. Allergen extracts cannot be regarded as generics. Immunotherapy is selected by specialists for stratified patients. There are no currently available validated biomarkers that can predict AIT success. In adolescents and adults, AIT should be reserved for patients with moderate/severe rhinitis or for those with moderate asthma who, despite appropriate pharmacotherapy and adherence, continue to exhibit exacerbations that appear to be related to allergen exposure, except in some specific cases. Immunotherapy may be even more advantageous in patients with multimorbidity. In children, AIT may prevent asthma onset in patients with rhinitis. mHealth tools are promising for the stratification and follow-up of patients.
  • Bousquet, J.; Bewick, M.; Cano, A.; Eklund, P.; Fico, G.; Goswami, N.; Guldemond, N. A.; Henderson, D.; Hinkema, M. J.; Liotta, G.; Mair, A.; Molloy, W.; Monaco, A.; Monsonis-Paya, I.; Nizinska, A.; Papadopoulos, H.; Pavlickova, A.; Pecorelli, S.; Prados-Torres, A.; Roller-Wirnsberger, R. E.; Somekh, D.; Vera-Munoz, C.; Visser, F.; Farrell, J.; Malva, J.; Ranberg, K. Andersen; Camuzat, T.; Carriazo, A. M.; Crooks, G.; Gutter, Z.; Iaccarino, G.; Manuel De Keenoy, E.; Moda, G.; Rodriguez-Manas, L.; Vontetsianos, T.; Abreu, C.; Alonso, J.; Alonso-Bouzon, C.; Ankri, J.; Arredondo, M. T.; Avolio, F.; Bedbrook, A.; Bialoszewski, A. Z.; Blain, H.; Bourret, R.; Cabrera-Umpierrez, M. F.; Catala, A.; O'Caoimh, R.; Cesari, M.; Chavannes, N. H.; Correia-Da-Sousa, J.; Dedeu, T.; Ferrando, M.; Ferri, M.; Fokkens, W. J.; Garcia-Lizana, F.; Guerin, O.; Hellings, P. W.; Haahtela, T.; Illario, M.; Inzerilli, M. C.; Carlsen, K. C. Lodrup; Kardas, P.; Keil, T.; Maggio, M.; Mendez-Zorrilla, A.; Menditto, E.; Mercier, J.; Michel, J. P.; Murray, R.; Nogues, M.; O'Byrne-Maguire, I.; Pappa, D.; Parent, A. S.; Pastorino, M.; Robalo-Cordeiro, C.; Samolinski, B.; Siciliano, P.; Teixeira, A. M.; Tsartara, S. I.; Valiulis, A.; Vandenplas, O.; Vasankari, T.; Vellas, B.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, M.; Wickman, M.; Yorgancioglu, A.; Zuberbier, T.; Barbagallo, M.; Canonica, G. W.; Klimek, L.; Maggi, S.; Aberer, W.; Akdis, C.; Adcock, I. M.; Agache, I.; Albera, C.; Alonso-Trujillo, F.; Angel Guarcia, M.; Annesi-Maesano, I.; Apostolo, J.; Arshad, S. H.; Attalin, V.; Avignon, A.; Bachert, C.; Baroni, I.; Bel, E.; Benson, M.; Bescos, C.; Blasi, F.; Barbara, C.; Bergmann, K. C.; Bernard, P. L.; Bonini, S.; Bousquet, P. J.; Branchini, B.; Brightling, C. E.; Bruguiere, V.; Bunu, C.; Bush, A.; Caimmi, D. P.; Calderon, M. A.; Canovas, G.; Cardona, V.; Carlsen, K. H.; Cesario, A.; Chkhartishvili, E.; Chiron, R.; Chivato, T.; Chung, K. F.; D'Angelantonio, M.; De Carlo, G.; Cholley, D.; Chorin, F.; Combe, B.; Compas, B.; Costa, D. J.; Costa, E.; Coste, O.; Coupet, A. -L.; Crepaldi, G.; Custovic, A.; Dahl, R.; Dahlen, S. E.; Demoly, P.; Devillier, P.; Didier, A.; Dinh-Xuan, A. T.; Djukanovic, R.; Dokic, D.; Du Toit, G.; Dubakiene, R.; Dupeyron, A.; Emuzyte, R.; Fiocchi, A.; Wagner, A.; Fletcher, M.; Fonseca, J.; Fougere, B.; Gamkrelidze, A.; Garces, G.; Garcia-Aymeric, J.; Garcia-Zapirain, B.; Gemicioglu, B.; Gouder, C.; Hellquist-Dahl, B.; Hermosilla-Gimeno, I.; Heve, D.; Holland, C.; Humbert, M.; Hyland, M.; Johnston, S. L.; Just, J.; Jutel, M.; Kaidashev, I. P.; Khaitov, M.; Kalayci, O.; Kalyoncu, A. F.; Keijser, W.; Kerstjens, H.; Knezovic, J.; Kowalski, M.; Koppelman, G. H.; Kotska, T.; Kovac, M.; Kull, I.; Kuna, P.; Kvedariene, V.; Lepore, V.; Macnee, W.; Maggio, M.; Magnan, A.; Majer, I.; Manning, P.; Marcucci, M.; Marti, T.; Masoli, M.; Melen, E.; Miculinic, N.; Mihaltan, F.; Milenkovic, B.; Millot-Keurinck, J.; Mlinaric, H.; Momas, I.; Montefort, S.; Morais-Almeida, M.; Moreno-Casbas, T.; Moesges, R.; Mullol, J.; Nadif, R.; Nalin, M.; Navarro-Pardo, E.; Nekam, K.; Ninot, G.; Paccard, D.; Pais, S.; Palummeri, E.; Panzner, P.; Papadopoulos, N. K.; Papanikolaou, C.; Passalacqua, G.; Pastor, E.; Perrot, M.; Plavec, D.; Popov, T. A.; Postma, D. S.; Price, D.; Raffort, N.; Reuzeau, J. C.; Robine, J. M.; Rodenas, F.; Robusto, F.; Roche, N.; Romano, A.; Romano, V.; Rosado-Pinto, J.; Roubille, F.; Ruiz, F.; Ryan, D.; Salcedo, T.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Schulz, H.; Schunemann, H. J.; Serrano, E.; Sheikh, A.; Shields, M.; Siafakas, N.; Scichilone, N.; Siciliano, P.; Skrindo, I.; Smit, H. A.; Sourdet, S.; Sousa-Costa, E.; Spranger, O.; Sooronbaev, T.; Sruk, V.; Sterk, P. J.; Todo-Bom, A.; Touchon, J.; Tramontano, D.; Triggiani, M.; Tsartara, S. I.; Valero, A. L.; Valovirta, E.; Van Ganse, E.; Van Hage, M.; Van den Berge, M.; Vandenplas, O.; Ventura, M. T.; Vergara, I.; Vezzani, G.; Vidal, D.; Viegi, G.; Wagemann, M.; Whalley, B.; Wickman, M.; Wilson, N.; Yiallouros, P. K.; Zagar, M.; Zaidi, A.; Zidarn, M.; Hoogerwerf, E. J.; Usero, J.; Zuffada, R.; Senn, A.; De Oliveira-Alves, B. (2017)
    The Strategic Implementation Plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) proposed six Action Groups. After almost three years of activity, many achievements have been obtained through commitments or collaborative work of the Action Groups. However, they have often worked in silos and, consequently, synergies between Action Groups have been proposed to strengthen the triple win of the EIP on AHA. The paper presents the methodology and current status of the Task Force on EIP on AHA synergies. Synergies are in line with the Action Groups' new Renovated Action Plan (2016-2018) to ensure that their future objectives are coherent and fully connected. The outcomes and impact of synergies are using the Monitoring and Assessment Framework for the EIP on AHA (MAFEIP). Eight proposals for synergies have been approved by the Task Force: Five cross-cutting synergies which can be used for all current and future synergies as they consider overarching domains (appropriate polypharmacy, citizen empowerment, teaching and coaching on AHA, deployment of synergies to EU regions, Responsible Research and Innovation), and three cross-cutting synergies focussing on current Action Group activities (falls, frailty, integrated care and chronic respiratory diseases).
  • Virtanen, Marianna; Oksanen, Tuula; Batty, G. David; Ala-Mursula, Leena; Salo, Paula; Elovainio, Marko; Pentti, Jaana; Lyback, Katinka; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimaki, Mika (2014)
  • Myers, Rodd; Rutt, Rebecca L.; McDermott, Constance; Maryudi, Ahmad; Acheampong, Emmanuel; Camargo, Marisa; Cam, Hoang (2020)
    Timber legality trade restrictions and verification are a bundle of contemporary mechanisms triggered by global concerns about forest degradation and deforestation. The European Union Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade initiative is a significant effort to not only screen out illegal timber and wood products from the EU, but also support trading partner countries to improve their legality definitions and verification processes. But by using bilateral agreements (Voluntary Partnership Agreements) as a key mechanism, the EU legitimizes trade partner nation-states as the authority to decide what is legal. We engage in a theoretical debate about the complexities of the meaning of legality, and then analyze empirical data collected from interviews in Ghana, Indonesia, Vietnam and Europe with policy, civil society and industry actors to understand how different actors understand legality. We find hegemonic notions of Westphalian statehood at the core of 'global' notions of legality and often contrast with local understandings of legality. Non-state actors understand these hegemonic notions of legality as imposed upon them and part of a colonial legacy. Further, notions of legality that fail to conform with hegemonic understandings are readily framed by nation- states as immoral or criminal. We emphasize the importance of understanding these framings to elucidate the embedded assumptions about what comprises legality within assemblages of global actors.
  • Saarikoski, Heli; Primmer, Eeva; Saarela, Sanna-Riikka; Antunes, Paula; Aszalos, Reka; Baro, Francesc; Berry, Pam; Garcia Blanko, Gemma; Gomez-Baggethun, Erik; Carvalho, Laurence; Dick, Jan; Dunford, Robert; Hanzu, Mihail; Harrison, Paula A.; Izakovicova, Zita; Kertesz, Miklos; Kopperoinen, Leena; Kohler, Berit; Langemeyer, Johannes; Lapola, David; Liquete, Camino; Luque, Sandra; Mederly, Peter; Niemelä, Jari; Palomo, Ignacio; Martinez Pastur, Guillermo; Luis Peri, Pablo; Preda, Elena; Priess, Joerg A.; Santos, Rui; Schleyer, Christian; Turkelboom, Francis; Vadineanu, Angheluta; Verheyden, Wim; Vikstrom, Suvi; Young, Juliette (2018)
    The promise that ecosystem service assessments will contribute to better decision-making is not yet proven. We analyse how knowledge on ecosystem services is actually used to inform land and water management in 22 case studies covering different social-ecological systems in European and Latin American countries. None of the case studies reported instrumental use of knowledge in a sense that ecosystem service knowledge would have served as an impartial arbiter between policy options. Yet, in most cases, there was some evidence of conceptual learning as a result of close interaction between researchers, practitioners and stakeholders. We observed several factors that constrained knowledge uptake, including competing interests and political agendas, scientific disputes, professional norms and competencies, and lack of vertical and horizontal integration. Ecosystem knowledge played a small role particularly in those planning and policy-making situations where it challenged established interests and the current distribution of benefits from ecosystems. The factors that facilitated knowledge use included application of transparent participatory methods, social capital, policy champions and clear synergies between ecosystem services and human well-being. The results are aligned with previous studies which have emphasized the importance of building local capacity, ownership and trust for the long-term success of ecosystem service research. (C) 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.
  • McCrackin, Michelle L.; Gustafsson, Bo G.; Hong, Bongghi; Howarth, Robert W.; Humborg, Christoph; Savchuk, Oleg P.; Svanback, Annika; Swaney, Dennis P. (2018)
    While progress has been made in reducing external nutrient inputs to the Baltic Sea, further actions are needed to meet the goals of the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP), especially for the Baltic Proper, Gulf of Finland, and Gulf of Riga sub-basins. We used the net anthropogenic nitrogen and phosphorus inputs (NANI and NAPI, respectively) nutrient accounting approach to construct three scenarios of reduced NANI-NAPI. Reductions assumed that manure nutrients were redistributed from areas with intense animal production to areas that focus on crop production and would otherwise import synthetic and mineral fertilizers. We also used the Simple as Necessary Baltic Long Term Large Scale (SANBALTS) model to compare eutrophication conditions for the scenarios to current and BSAP-target conditions. The scenarios suggest that reducing NANI-NAPI by redistributing manure nutrients, together with improving agronomic practices, could meet 54-82% of the N reductions targets (28-43 kt N reduction) and 38-64% P reduction targets (4-6.6 kt P reduction), depending on scenario. SANBALTS output showed that even partial fulfillment of nutrient reduction targets could have ameliorating effects on eutrophication conditions. Meeting BSAP targets will require addressing additional sources, such as sewage. A common approach to apportioning sources to external nutrients loads could enable further assessment of the feasibility of eutrophication management targets.
  • Eskelinen, Teppo; Ylonen, Matti (2017)
    Tax havens and tax flight have lately received increasing attention, while interest toward multilateral trade policies has somewhat diminished. We argue that more attention needs to be paid exactly to the interrelations between trade and tax policies. Drawing from two case studies on Panama's trade disputes, we show how World Trade Organization (WTO) rules can be used both to resist attempts to sanction secrecy structures and to promote measures against tax flight. The theory of new constitutionalism can help to explain how trade treaties can 'lock in' tax policies. However, our case studies show that trade policy not only 'locks in' democratic policy-making, but also enables tax havens to use their commercialized sovereignty to resists anti-secrecy measures. What is being 'locked in' are the policy tools, not necessarily the policies. The changing relationship between trade and tax policies can also create new and unexpected tools for tackling tax evasion, underlining the importance of epistemic arbitrage in the context of new constitutionalism. In principle, political actors with sufficient technical and juridical knowledge can shape global tax governance to various directions regardless of their formal position in the world political hierarchies. This should be taken into account when trade treaties are being negotiated or revised.
  • Peura, Pekka; Haapanen, Ari; Reini, Kaarina; Törmä, Hannu (2018)
    The scope of this research is to make quantitative estimates of the potential economic and employment impacts of renewable energy self-sufficiency. The study aims to make generalizations on a regional, or even national level, and to give directions for future research. This paper analyses direct monetary values and employment impacts in two regions, in a theoretical situation where all energy is produced by renewables from the respective region. Renewable energy, especially utilization of existing but presently unused resources, can play an important role in vitalizing regional economies, especially in rural areas. The money spent on fossil energy could be kept circulating in the regional economy. The amount spent on energy in the research areas was almost (sic)4860 per capita per year, totalling more than 300 m annually. The existing data shows that there is the potential for self-sufficiency, or even surplus production. The results suggest that the regional economic impacts increase considerably if the region is self-sufficient in raw materials, including intermediates. On a larger scale, e.g., nationally, the loss of jobs in the fossil energy industry and the eventual variations within economies potentially based on renewable energy, will affect the overall impacts. There is at present insufficient scientific literature, knowledge or quantitative data for analysing these impacts thoroughly.This paper contributes to filling this gap. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Stenholm, Sari; Head, Jenny; Kivimaki, Mika; Kawachi, Ichiro; Aalto, Ville; Zins, Marie; Goldberg, Marcel; Zaninotto, Paola; Hanson, Linda Magnuson; Westerlund, Hugo; Vahtera, Jussi (2016)
    Background: Smoking, physical inactivity and obesity are modifiable risk factors for morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to examine the extent to which the co-occurrence of these behaviour-related risk factors predict healthy life expectancy and chronic disease-free life expectancy in four European cohort studies. Methods: Data were drawn from repeated waves of four cohort studies in England, Finland, France and Sweden. Smoking status, physical inactivity and obesity (body mass index >= 30 kg/m(2)) were examined separately and in combination. Health expectancy was estimated by using two health indicators: suboptimal self-rated health and having a chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, cancer, respiratory disease and diabetes). Multistate life table models were used to estimate sex-specific healthy life expectancy and chronic disease-free life expectancy from ages 50 to 75 years. Results: Compared with men and women with at least two behaviour-related risk factors, those with no behaviour-related risk factors could expect to live on average8 years longer in good health and 6 years longer free of chronic diseases between ages 50 and 75.Having any single risk factor was also associated with reduction in healthy years. No consistent differences between cohorts were observed. Conclusions: Data from four European countries show that persons with individual and co-occurring behaviour-related risk factors have shorter healthy life expectancy and shorter chronic disease-free life expectancy. Population level reductions in smoking, physical inactivity and obesity could increase life-years lived in good health.
  • Leppälahti, Suvi; Gissler, M.; Mentula, M.; Heikinheimo, O. (2012)