Browsing by Subject "EVENTS"

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  • Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cintia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M. T.; Santos, Lorna H.; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martinez-Jarreta, Begona; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bassler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstaetter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F.; Domingues, Patricia M.; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D.; Hill, Carolyn R.; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D'Amato, Maria E.; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H. D.; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E.; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rudiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E.; Garcia, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; El Andari, Ansar; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martin, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M.; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luis Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Moura Neto, Rodrigo S.; Nogueira, Tatiana L. S.; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Nunez, Carolina; Martinez de Pancorbo, Marian; Olofsson, Jill K.; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cardenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L.; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U.; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Corazon De Ungria, Maria; Russell Rodriguez, Jae Joseph; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M.; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; de Calvit, Lina Solis; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H.; Gwynne, Gareth M.; Jobling, Mark A.; Whittle, Martin R.; Sumita, Denilce R.; Wolanska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y. Y.; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz (2014)
    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent.
  • Ala-Kurikka, Tommi; Pospelov, Alexey; Summanen, Milla; Alafuzoff, Aleksander; Kurki, Samu; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai (2021)
    Objective Birth asphyxia (BA) is often associated with seizures that may exacerbate the ensuing hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In rodent models of BA, exposure to hypoxia is used to evoke seizures, that commence already during the insult. This is in stark contrast to clinical BA, in which seizures are typically seen upon recovery. Here, we introduce a term-equivalent rat model of BA, in which seizures are triggered after exposure to asphyxia. Methods Postnatal day 11-12 male rat pups were exposed to steady asphyxia (15 min; air containing 5% O-2 + 20% CO2) or to intermittent asphyxia (30 min; three 5 + 5-min cycles of 9% and 5% O-2 at 20% CO2). Cortical activity and electrographic seizures were recorded in freely behaving animals. Simultaneous electrode measurements of intracortical pH, Po-2, and local field potentials (LFPs) were made under urethane anesthesia. Results Both protocols decreased blood pH to Significance The rate of brain pH recovery has a strong influence on post-asphyxia seizure propensity. The recurring hypoxic episodes during intermittent asphyxia promote neuronal excitability, which leads to seizures only after the suppressing effect of the hypercapnic acidosis is relieved. The present rodent model of BA is to our best knowledge the first one in which, consistent with clinical BA, behavioral and electrographic seizures are triggered after and not during the BA-mimicking insult.
  • Palojoki, Sari; Makela, Matti; Lehtonen, Lasse; Saranto, Kaija (2017)
    The aim of this study was to analyse electronic health record-related patient safety incidents in the patient safety incident reporting database in fully digital hospitals in Finland. We compare Finnish data to similar international data and discuss their content with regard to the literature. We analysed the types of electronic health record-related patient safety incidents that occurred at 23 hospitals during a 2-year period. A procedure of taxonomy mapping served to allow comparisons. This study represents a rare examination of patient safety risks in a fully digital environment. The proportion of electronic health record-related incidents was markedly higher in our study than in previous studies with similar data. Human-computer interaction problems were the most frequently reported. The results show the possibility of error arising from the complex interaction between clinicians and computers.
  • Cheng, Lu; Connor, Thomas R.; Aanensen, David M.; Spratt, Brian G.; Corander, Jukka (2011)
  • Buenrostro Mazon, S.; Riipinen, I.; Schultz, D. M.; Valtanen, M.; Dal Maso, M.; Sogacheva, L.; Junninen, H.; Nieminen, T.; Kerminen, V. -M.; Kulmala, M. (2009)
  • Wang, Xin; Dalmeijer, Geertje W.; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Anderson, Todd J.; Britton, Annie R.; Dekker, Jacqueline; Engstrom, Gunnar; Evans, Greg W.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Hedblad, Bo; Holewijn, Suzanne; Ikeda, Ai; Kauhanen, Jussi; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Kitamura, Akihiko; Kurl, Sudhir; Lonn, Eva M.; Lorenz, Matthias W.; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B.; Nijpels, Giel; Okazaki, Shuhei; Polak, Joseph F.; Price, Jacqueline F.; Rembold, Christopher M.; Rosvall, Maria; Rundek, Tatjana; Salonen, Jukka T.; Sitzer, Matthias; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Peters, Sanne A. E.; Bots, Michiel L. (2017)
    Background The relation of a single risk factor with atherosclerosis is established. Clinically we know of risk factor clustering within individuals. Yet, studies into the magnitude of the relation of risk factor clusters with atherosclerosis are limited. Here, we assessed that relation. Methods Individual participant data from 14 cohorts, involving 59,025 individuals were used in this cross-sectional analysis. We made 15 clusters of four risk factors (current smoking, overweight, elevated blood pressure, elevated total cholesterol). Multilevel age and sex adjusted linear regression models were applied to estimate mean differences in common carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) between clusters using those without any of the four risk factors as reference group. Results Compared to the reference, those with 1, 2, 3 or 4 risk factors had a significantly higher common CIMT: mean difference of 0.026 mm, 0.052 mm, 0.074 mm and 0.114 mm, respectively. These findings were the same in men and in women, and across ethnic groups. Within each risk factor cluster (1, 2, 3 risk factors), groups with elevated blood pressure had the largest CIMT and those with elevated cholesterol the lowest CIMT, a pattern similar for men and women. Conclusion Clusters of risk factors relate to increased common CIMT in a graded manner, similar in men, women and across race-ethnic groups. Some clusters seemed more atherogenic than others. Our findings support the notion that cardiovascular prevention should focus on sets of risk factors rather than individual levels alone, but may prioritize within clusters.
  • The CMS collaboration; Sirunyan, A. M.; Eerola, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Havukainen, J.; Heikkilä, J. K.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurila, S.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Siikonen, H.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuuva, T. (2019)
    This Letter describes a search for Higgs boson pair production using the combined results from four final states: bb gamma gamma, bb tau tau, bbbb, and bbVV, where V represents a W or Z boson. The search is performed using data collected in 2016 by the CMS experiment from LHC proton-proton collisions at root s = 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb(-1). Limits are set on the Higgs boson pair production cross section. A 95% confidence level observed (expected) upper limit on the non-resonant production cross section is set at 22.2 (12.8) times the standard model value. A search for narrow resonances decaying to Higgs boson pairs is also performed in the mass range 250-3000 GeV. No evidence for a signal is observed, and upper limits are set on the resonance production cross section.
  • The ATLAS collaboration; The CMS collaboration; Aad, G.; Aaboud, M.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Eerola, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Havukainen, J.; Heikkilä, J. K.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurila, S.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Siikonen, H.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuuva, T. (2019)
    This paper presents the combinations of single-top-quark production cross-section measurements by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations, using data from LHC proton-proton collisions at = 7 and 8 TeV corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1.17 to 5.1 fb(-1) at = 7 TeV and 12.2 to 20.3 fb(-1) at = 8 TeV. These combinations are performed per centre-of-mass energy and for each production mode: t-channel, tW, and s-channel. The combined t-channel cross-sections are 67.5 +/- 5.7 pb and 87.7 +/- 5.8 pb at = 7 and 8 TeV respectively. The combined tW cross-sections are 16.3 +/- 4.1 pb and 23.1 +/- 3.6 pb at = 7 and 8 TeV respectively. For the s-channel cross-section, the combination yields 4.9 +/- 1.4 pb at = 8 TeV. The square of the magnitude of the CKM matrix element V-tb multiplied by a form factor f(LV) is determined for each production mode and centre-of-mass energy, using the ratio of the measured cross-section to its theoretical prediction. It is assumed that the top-quark-related CKM matrix elements obey the relation |V-td|, |V-ts| << |V-tb|. All the |f(LV)V(tb)|(2) determinations, extracted from individual ratios at = 7 and 8 TeV, are combined, resulting in |f(LV)V(tb)| = 1.02 +/- 0.04 (meas.) +/- 0.02 (theo.). All combined measurements are consistent with their corresponding Standard Model predictions.
  • Paasonen, Pauli; Peltola, Maija; Kontkanen, Jenni; Junninen, Heikki; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Kulmala, Markku (2018)
    Growth of aerosol particles to sizes at which they can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is a crucial factor in estimating the current and future impacts of aerosol-cloud-climate interactions. Growth rates (GRs) are typically determined for particles with diameters (d(P)) smaller than 40 nm immediately after a regional new particle formation (NPF) event. These growth rates are often taken as representatives for the particle growth to CCN sizes (d(P) > 50-100 nm). In modelling frameworks, the concentration of the condensable vapours causing the growth is typically calculated with steady state assumptions, where the condensation sink (CS) is the only loss term for the vapours. Additionally, the growth to CCN sizes is represented with the condensation of extremely low-volatility vapours and gas-particle partitioning of semi-volatile vapours. Here, we use a novel automatic method to determine growth rates from below 10 nm to hundreds of nanometres from a 20-year-long particle size distribution (PSD) data set in boreal forest. With this method, we are able to detect growth rates also at times other than immediately after a NPF event. We show that the GR increases with an increasing oxidation rate of monoterpenes, which is closely coupled with the ambient temperature. Based on our analysis, the oxidation reactions of monoterpenes with ozone, hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical all are capable of producing vapours that contribute to the particle growth in the studied size ranges. We find that GR increases with particle diameter, resulting in up to 3-fold increases in GRs for particles with d(P) similar to 100 nm in comparison to those with d(P) similar to 10 nm. We use a single particle model to show that this increase in GR can be explained with aerosol-phase reactions, in which semi-volatile vapours form non-volatile dimers. Finally, our analysis reveals that the GR of particles with d(P) <100 nm is not limited by the condensation sink, even though the GR of larger particles is. Our findings suggest that in the boreal continental environment, the formation of CCN from NPF or sub-100 nm emissions is more effective than previously thought and that the formation of CCN is not as strongly self-limiting a process as the previous estimates have suggested.
  • Konev, Alexey A.; Kharitonov, Alexey; Rozov, Fedor N.; Altshuler, Evgeny P.; Serebryanaya, Daria; Lassus, Johan; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Katrukha, Alexey G.; Postnikov, Alexander B. (2020)
    Aims Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4) fragments have been shown to predict the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events, including segment-elevation myocardial infarction, in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We evaluated the prognostic value of the carboxy-terminal fragment of IGFBP-4 (CT-IGFBP-4) for all-cause mortality in emergency room patients with acute heart failure (AHF). Methods and results CT-IGFBP-4, N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at admission from the lithium-heparin plasma of 156 patients with AHF. All-cause mortality was recorded for 1 year. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox proportional hazard ratio analyses were performed to evaluate the prognostic value of the various clinical variables, CT-IGFBP-4, NT-proBNP, CRP, and their combinations. During 1 year of follow-up, 52 (33.3%) patients died. CT-IGFBP-4 only weakly correlated with NT-proBNP (Pearson correlation coefficient r = 0.16, P = 0.044) and did not correlate with CRP (r = 0.08, P = 0.35), emphasizing the different nature of these biomarkers. The receiver operator characteristic area under the curve (ROC AUC) of CT-IGFBP-4 for the prediction of all-cause mortality (0.727) was significantly higher than that of NT-proBNP (0.680, P = 0.045) and CRP (0.669, P = 0.016). The combination of CT-IGFBP-4, NT-proBNP, and CRP predicted mortality significantly better (ROC AUC = 0.788) than any of the biomarkers alone (P <0.01 for all). The addition of CT-IGFBP-4 to a clinical prediction model that included age, gender, systolic blood pressure, creatinine, and sodium levels, as well as the history of previous heart failure, coronary artery disease, and hypertension significantly improved the mortality risk prediction (ROC AUC 0.774 vs. 0.699, P = 0.025). Cox hazard analysis indicated that elevated CT-IGFBP-4 was independently associated with 1 year mortality (hazard ratio 3.26, P = 0.0008) after adjustment for age, gender, history of previous heart failure, coronary artery disease, hypertension, chronic kidney failure, history of diabetes, heart rate, haemoglobin, plasma sodium, NT-proBNP, CRP, cystatin C, and elevated cardiac troponin I or T. Patients with increased levels of either two or three of the biomarkers CT-IGFBP-4, NT-proBNP, and CRP had significantly higher mortality risk (adjusted hazard ratio 10.04, P <0.0001) than patients with increased levels of one or none of the biomarkers. Conclusions CT-IGFBP-4 was independently associated with all-cause mortality in patients with AHF. Compared with single biomarkers, the combination of CT-IGFBP-4, NT-proBNP, and CRP improved the prediction of all-cause mortality in patients with AHF.
  • Nuotio, Joel; Vahamurto, Lauri; Pahkala, Katja; Magnussen, Costan G.; Hutri-Kahonen, Nina; Kahonen, Mika; Laitinen, Tomi; Taittonen, Leena; Tossavainen, Paivi; Lehtimaki, Terho; Jokinen, Eero; Viikari, Jorma S. A.; Raitakari, Olli; Juonala, Markus (2019)
    Aims: Disparity in cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and risk factor levels between urban and rural regions has been confirmed worldwide. The aim of this study was to examine how living in different community types (urban-rural) in childhood and adulthood are related to cardiovascular risk factors and surrogate markers of CVD such as carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and left ventricular mass (LVM). Methods: The study population comprised 2903 participants (54.1% female, mean age 10.5 years in 1980) of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study who had been clinically examined in 1980 (age 3-18 years) and had participated in at least one adult follow-up (2001-2011). Results: In adulthood, urban residents had lower systolic blood pressure (-1 mmHg), LDL-cholesterol (-0.05 mmol/l), lower body mass index (-1.0 kg/m(2)) and glycosylated haemoglobin levels (-0.05 mmol/mol), and lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome (19.9 v. 23.7%) than their rural counterparts. In addition, participants continuously living in urban areas had significantly lower IMT (-0.01 mm), LVM (1.59 g/m(2.7)) and pulse wave velocity (-0.22 m/s) and higher carotid artery compliance (0.07%/10 mmHg) compared to persistently rural residents. The differences in surrogate markers of CVD were only partially attenuated when adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions: Participants living in urban communities had a more favourable cardiovascular risk factor profile than rural residents. Furthermore, participants continuously living in urban areas had less subclinical markers related to CVD compared with participants living in rural areas. Urban-rural differences in cardiovascular health might provide important opportunities for optimizing prevention by targeting areas of highest need.
  • Hallikainen, Maarit; Halonen, Janne; Konttinen, Jussi; Lindholm, Harri; Simonen, Piia; Nissinen, Markku J.; Gylling, Helena (2013)
  • Paciaroni, Maurizio; Angelini, Filippo; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Furie, Karen L.; Tadi, Prasanna; Becattini, Cecilia; Falocci, Nicola; Zedde, Marialuisa; Abdul-Rahim, Azmil H.; Lees, Kennedy R.; Alberti, Andrea; Venti, Michele; Acciarresi, Monica; Altavilla, Riccardo; D'Amore, Cataldo; Mosconi, Maria G.; Cimini, Ludovica A.; Bovi, Paolo; Carletti, Monica; Rigatelli, Alberto; Cappellari, Manuel; Putaala, Jukka; Tomppo, Liisa; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Bandini, Fabio; Marcheselli, Simona; Pezzini, Alessandro; Poli, Loris; Padovani, Alessandro; Masotti, Luca; Vannucchi, Vieri; Sohn, Sung-Il; Lorenzini, Gianni; Tassi, Rossana; Guideri, Francesca; Acampa, Maurizio; Martini, Giuseppe; Ntaios, George; Karagkiozi, Efstathia; Athanasakis, George; Makaritsis, Kostantinos; Vadikolias, Kostantinos; Liantinioti, Chrysoula; Chondrogianni, Maria; Mumoli, Nicola; Consoli, Domenico; Galati, Franco; Sacco, Simona; Carolei, Antonio; Tiseo, Cindy; Corea, Francesco; Ageno, Walter; Bellesini, Marta; Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Ciccone, Alfonso; Scoditti, Umberto; Denti, Licia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Maccarrone, Miriam; Orlandi, Giovanni; Giannini, Nicola; Gialdini, Gino; Tassinari, Tiziana; De Lodovici, Maria Luisa; Bono, Giorgio; Rueckert, Christina; Baldi, Antonio; Toni, Danilo; Letteri, Federica; Giuntini, Martina; Lotti, Enrico M.; Flomin, Yuriy; Pieroni, Alessio; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Karapanayiotides, Theodore; Monaco, Serena; Baronello, Mario M.; Csiba, Laszlo; Szabo, Lilla; Chiti, Alberto; Giorli, Elisa; Del Sette, Massimo; Imberti, Davide; Zabzuni, Dorjan; Doronin, Boris; Volodina, Vera; Pd-Mer, Patrik Michel; Vanacker, Peter; Barlinn, Kristian; Pallesen, Lars P.; Kepplinger, Jessica; Deleu, Dirk; Melikyan, Gayane; Ibrahim, Faisal; Akhtar, Naveed; Gourbali, Vanessa; Yaghi, Shadi; Caso, Valeria (2019)
    Background The relationship between different patterns of atrial fibrillation and early recurrence after an acute ischaemic stroke is unclear. Purpose In a prospective cohort study, we evaluated the rates of early ischaemic recurrence after an acute ischaemic stroke in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or sustained atrial fibrillation which included persistent and permanent atrial fibrillation. Methods In patients with acute ischaemic stroke, atrial fibrillation was categorised as paroxysmal atrial fibrillation or sustained atrial fibrillation. Ischaemic recurrences were the composite of ischaemic stroke, transient ischaemic attack and symptomatic systemic embolism occurring within 90 days from acute index stroke. Results A total of 2150 patients (1155 females, 53.7%) were enrolled: 930 (43.3%) had paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and 1220 (56.7%) sustained atrial fibrillation. During the 90-day follow-up, 111 ischaemic recurrences were observed in 107 patients: 31 in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (3.3%) and 76 with sustained atrial fibrillation (6.2%) (hazard ratio (HR) 1.86 (95% CI 1.24-2.81)). Patients with sustained atrial fibrillation were on average older, more likely to have diabetes mellitus, hypertension, history of stroke/ transient ischaemic attack, congestive heart failure, atrial enlargement, high baseline NIHSS-score and implanted pacemaker. After adjustment by Cox proportional hazard model, sustained atrial fibrillation was not associated with early ischaemic recurrences (adjusted HR 1.23 (95% CI 0.74-2.04)). Conclusions After acute ischaemic stroke, patients with sustained atrial fibrillation had a higher rate of early ischaemic recurrence than patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. After adjustment for relevant risk factors, sustained atrial fibrillation was not associated with a significantly higher risk of recurrence, thus suggesting that the risk profile associated with atrial fibrillation, rather than its pattern, is determinant for recurrence.
  • Karalis, Elina; Gissler, Mika; Tapper, Anna-Maija; Ulander, Veli-Matti (2016)
    Objective: To evaluate the influence of delivery unit size and on-call staffing in the performance of low-risk deliveries in Finland. Study design: A population-based study of hospital size and level based on Medical Birth Register data. Population was all hospital births in Finland in 2005-2009. Inclusion criteria were singleton births (birth weight 2500 g or more) without major congenital anomalies or birth defects. Additionally, only intrapartum stillbirths were included. Birthweights and maternal background characteristics were adjusted for by logistic regression. Main outcome measures were intrapartum or early neonatal mortality, neonatal asphyxia and newborns' need for intensive care or transfer to other hospital and longer duration of care. On-call arrangements were asked from each of the hospitals. Results: Intrapartum mortality was higher in units where physicians were at home when on-call (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.02-1.52). A tendency to a higher mortality was also recorded in non-university hospitals (OR 1.18; 95% CI 0.99-1.40). Early neonatal mortality was twofold in units with less than 1000 births annually (OR 2.11; 95% CI 0.97-4.56) and in units where physicians were at home when on-call (OR 1.85; 95% CI 0.91-3.76). These results did not reach statistical significance. No differences between the units were found regarding Apgar scores or umbilical cord pH. Conclusion: The differences in mortality rates between different level hospitals suggest that adverse outcomes during delivery should be studied in detail in relation to hospital characteristics, such as size or level, and more international studies determining obstetric patient safety indicators are required. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Mostowy, Rafal; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Andam, Cheryl P.; Corander, Jukka; Hanage, William P.; Marttinen, Pekka (2017)
    Prokaryotic evolution is affected by horizontal transfer of genetic material through recombination. Inference of an evolutionary tree of bacteria thus relies on accurate identification of the population genetic structure and recombination-derived mosaicism. Rapidly growing databases represent a challenge for computational methods to detect recombinations in bacterial genomes. We introduce a novel algorithm called fastGEAR which identifies lineages in diverse microbial alignments, and recombinations between them and from external origins. The algorithm detects both recent recombinations (affecting a few isolates) and ancestral recombinations between detected lineages (affecting entire lineages), thus providing insight into recombinations affecting deep branches of the phylogenetic tree. In simulations, fastGEAR had comparable power to detect recent recombinations and outstanding power to detect the ancestral ones, compared with state-of-the-art methods, often with a fraction of computational cost. We demonstrate the utility of the method by analyzing a collection of 616 whole-genomes of a recombinogenic pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, for which the method provided a high-resolution view of recombination across the genome. We examined in detail the penicillin-binding genes across the Streptococcus genus, demonstrating previously undetected genetic exchanges between different species at these three loci. Hence, fastGEAR can be readily applied to investigate mosaicism in bacterial genes across multiple species. Finally, fastGEAR correctly identified many known recombination hotspots and pointed to potential new ones. Matlab code and Linux/Windows executables are available at https://users.ics.aalto.fi/similar to pemartti/fastGEAR/ (last accessed February 6, 2017).
  • Ding, A. J.; Huang, X.; Nie, W.; Sun, J. N.; Kerminen, V. -M.; Petäjä, T.; Su, H.; Cheng, Y. F.; Yang, X. -Q.; Wang, M. H.; Chi, X. G.; Wang, J. P.; Virkkula, A.; Guo, W. D.; Yuan, J.; Wang, S. Y.; Zhang, R. J.; Wu, Y. F.; Song, Y.; Zhu, T.; Zilitinkevich, S.; Kulmala, M.; Fu, C. B. (2016)
    Aerosol-planetary boundary layer (PBL) interactions have been found to enhance air pollution in megacities in China. We show that black carbon (BC) aerosols play the key role in modifying the PBL meteorology and hence enhancing the haze pollution. With model simulations and data analysis from various field observations in December 2013, we demonstrate that BC induces heating in the PBL, particularly in the upper PBL, and the resulting decreased surface heat flux substantially depresses the development of PBL and consequently enhances the occurrences of extreme haze pollution episodes. We define this process as the dome effect of BC and suggest an urgent need for reducing BC emissions as an efficient way to mitigate the extreme haze pollution in megacities of China.
  • The CMS collaboration; Sirunyan, A. M.; Eerola, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Havukainen, J.; Heikkilä, J. K.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurila, S.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Siikonen, H.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuuva, T. (2018)
    Results of a search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top quark pair (t (t) over barH) in final states with electrons, muons, and hadronically decaying tau leptons are presented. The analyzed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb(-1) recorded in proton-proton collisions at root s = 13 TeV by the CMS experiment in 2016. The sensitivity of the search is improved by using matrix element and machine learning methods to separate the signal from backgrounds. The measured signal rate amounts to 1.23(-0.43)(+0.45) times the production rate expected in the standard model, with an observed (expected) significance of 3.2 sigma (2.8 sigma), which represents evidence for t (t) over barH production in those final states. An upper limit on the signal rate of 2.1 times the standard model production rate is set at 95% confidence level.
  • The CMS collaboration; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Eerola, P.; Forthomme, Laurent; Kirschenmann, H.; Österberg, K.; Voutilainen, M.; Brücken, Erik; Garcia, F.; Havukainen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kim, Minsuk; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurila, S.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Siikonen, H.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuuva, T. (2021)
    Evidence is presented for the electroweak (EW) production of two jets (jj) in association with two Z-bosons and constraints on anomalous quartic gauge couplings are set. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at root s = 13 TeVcollected with the CMS detector in 2016-2018, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 137 fb(-1). The search is performed in the fully leptonic final state ZZ -> lll'l', where l, l' = e, mu. The EW production of two jets in association with two Zbosons is measured with an observed (expected) significance of 4.0 (3.5) standard deviations. The cross sections for the EW production are measured in three fiducial volumes and the result is sigma(EW)(pp -> ZZjj -> lll'l'jj) = 0.33(-0.10)(+0.11)(stat)(-0.03)(+0.04)(syst) fbin the most inclusive volume, in agreement with the standard model prediction of 0.275 +/- 0.021fb. Measurements of total cross sections for jj production in association with two Zbosons are also reported. Limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings are derived in terms of the effective field theory operators T0, T1, T2, T8, and T9. (C) 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license.
  • The CMS collaboration; Sirunyan, A. M.; Eerola, P.; Forthomme, L.; Kirschenmann, H.; Österberg, K.; Voutilainen, M.; Garcia, F.; Havukainen, J.; Heikkilä, J. K.; Järvinen, T.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampen, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurila, S.; Lehti, S.; Linden, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Siikonen, H.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuuva, T. (2020)
    A search forWWproduction from double-parton scattering processes using same-charge electron-muon and dimuon events is reported, based on proton-proton collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The analyzed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 77.4 fb-1, collected using the CMS detector at the LHC in 2016 and 2017. Multivariate classifiers are used to discriminate between the signal and the dominant background processes. A maximum likelihood fit is performed to extract the signal cross section. This leads to the first evidence for WW production via double-parton scattering, with a significance of 3.9 standard deviations. The measured inclusive cross section is 1.41 +/- 0.28 (stat) +/- 0.28 (syst) pb.
  • Koponen, Mikael; Marjamaa, Annukka; Tuiskula, Annukka M.; Viitasalo, Matti; Nallinmaa-Luoto, Terhi; Leinonen, Jaakko T.; Widen, Elisabeth; Toivonen, Lauri; Kontula, Kimmo; Swan, Heikki (2020)
    Background Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a severe inherited arrhythmic disease associated with a risk of syncope and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Aims We aimed at identifying RYR2 P2328S founder mutation carriers and describing the clinical course associated with the mutation. Methods The study population was drawn from the Finnish Inherited Cardiac Disorder Research Registry, and from the present genealogical study. Kaplan-Meier graphs, log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to evaluate the clinical course. Results Genealogical study revealed a common ancestor couple living in the late 17(th) century. A total of 1837 living descendants were tested for RYR2 P2328S mutation unveiling 62 mutation carriers aged mean 3923 years old. No arrhythmic deaths were documented among genotyped subjects, but 11 SCDs were detected in non-genotyped family members since 1970. Three genotyped patients (5%) suffered an aborted cardiac arrest (ACA), and 15 (25%) had a syncope triggered by exercise or stress. Rate of cardiac events was higher among patients who in exercise stress test showed a maximum rate of premature ventricular contractions >30/min (68% vs 17%, p-blocker medication. Conclusions Previously undiagnosed CPVT patients may be identified by well-conducted genealogical studies. The RYR2 P2328S mutation causes a potentially severe phenotype, but its expression is variable, thus calling for additional studies on modifying factors.